Special Issue "Energy Consumption and Financial Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Cosimo Magazzino
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Political Sciences, Roma Tre University, Rome (RM), 00145, Italy
Interests: energy economics; environmental economics; renewable energy; CO2 emissions; public finance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent studies have shown that financial development can affect energy use. Financial development helps industrial growth, creates demand for new infrastructure and, thus, positively affects energy use. Moreover, financial development can lower energy consumption by achieving its efficient use. At the consumer end, financial development lowers the cost of credit and makes it accessible. A sufficiently developed financial market enhances consumer and business participation, promotes economic activity and boosts energy use. Financial development assists with trade growth—increasing the aggregate demand—as well as the quality of infrastructure, such that it influences energy consumption.

However, the nexus between financial development and energy consumption remains a controversial topic in the economic literature. This Special Issue aims to collect original contributions on the subject, both empirical and theoretical, with analyses dedicated to different countries and conducted with different econometric techniques.

The findings will help policymakers in emerging countries to develop a strategy to reduce the impact of energy consumption by controlling resource transfer through globalisation to the host country and by adopting energy conversion policies.

Prof. Dr. Cosimo Magazzino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy consumption
  • financial development
  • CO2 emissions

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Financial Development and CO2 Emissions in Post-Transition European Union Countries
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2640; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072640 - 26 Mar 2020
Abstract
Carbon dioxide emissions are on the rise, posing a serious global issue. Therefore, it is important that policymakers identify the exact causes of these emissions. This paper investigates the influence of financial development, primary energy consumption, and economic growth on CO2 emissions [...] Read more.
Carbon dioxide emissions are on the rise, posing a serious global issue. Therefore, it is important that policymakers identify the exact causes of these emissions. This paper investigates the influence of financial development, primary energy consumption, and economic growth on CO2 emissions in 11 post-transition European economies. The assessment was made for the 1995–2017 period using panel cointegration and causality analyses. The causality analyses did not reveal significant connection between financial sector development and CO2 emissions, but rather a two-way causality between primary energy consumption and economic growth, on one hand, and CO2 emissions on the other. Meanwhile, long-run analysis disclosed that financial sector development and primary energy consumption positively affected CO2 emissions. Our results seek to grab the attention of policy makers, who could work towards creating country-specific strategies that balance the relationship between financial development and CO2 emissions. These long-term policies could ensure both development of the financial sector and environmental protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Consumption and Financial Development)
Open AccessArticle
Decoupling Elasticity and Driving Factors of Energy Consumption and Economic Development in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1326; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041326 - 12 Feb 2020
Abstract
Decoupling of energy consumption and economic development is a key factor in achieving sustainable regional development. The decoupling relationship between energy consumption and economic development in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau region is still unclear. This paper uses the logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) decomposition [...] Read more.
Decoupling of energy consumption and economic development is a key factor in achieving sustainable regional development. The decoupling relationship between energy consumption and economic development in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau region is still unclear. This paper uses the logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) decomposition method and Tapio elastic index model to analyze the decoupling degree and driving factors of energy consumption and economic development, and evaluates the decoupling effort level in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau from 2006 to 2016. The results indicate that the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau region showed a weak decoupling as a whole, and that only Tibet experienced expanding negative decoupling in 2006–2007 and an expansion link in 2007–2008. Economic scale is a primary factor that hinders the decoupling of energy consumption, followed by investment intensity and industrial energy structure. The cumulative promotion effect of research and development (R&D) efficiency and intensity and the inhibition effect of investment intensity cancel each other out. With the exception of Tibet and Xinjiang, all provinces in the Qinghai-Tibet plateau have made decoupling efforts. Decoupling efforts made by R&D efficiency contributed the most, followed by energy intensity and R&D intensity. This paper provides policy recommendations for the decoupling of energy consumption experience for underdeveloped regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Consumption and Financial Development)
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Open AccessArticle
“Green” Information Promotes Employees’ Voluntary Green Behavior via Work Values and Perceived Accountability
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6335; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226335 - 12 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A range of different approaches has been used to involve employees in green workplace initiatives. One example of such an approach is to spread awareness by displaying “green” information concerning work-related environmental protection and sustainability information on organizational bulletin boards. The study aims [...] Read more.
A range of different approaches has been used to involve employees in green workplace initiatives. One example of such an approach is to spread awareness by displaying “green” information concerning work-related environmental protection and sustainability information on organizational bulletin boards. The study aims to examine how green display rules and felt accountability influence the relationship between new-generation employees’ work values and green behavior. There were 567 Chinese millennial employees who participated in this study. The results showed that intrinsic preference, interpersonal harmony, innovative orientation, and long-term development had a positive influence on employees’ green behavior through the effect of felt accountability. Besides, the more green information displayed, the stronger the effect of intrinsic preference, interpersonal harmony, and long-term development on employees’ green behavior. This study provides valuable insights for managers to understand the work values of the new-generation employees and, in turn, improve their green awareness, which can help execute corporate social responsibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Consumption and Financial Development)
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluating the Performances of Taiwan’s International Tourist Hotels: Applying the Directional Distance Function and Meta-Frontier Approach
Sustainability 2019, 11(20), 5773; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11205773 - 17 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This study employs the directional distance function in the meta-frontier model by expanding outputs, contracting inputs, and fastening quasi-fixed inputs simultaneously on a dataset of 170 observations obtained from the annual reports of international tourist hotels. Empirical results show that the meta-efficiency and [...] Read more.
This study employs the directional distance function in the meta-frontier model by expanding outputs, contracting inputs, and fastening quasi-fixed inputs simultaneously on a dataset of 170 observations obtained from the annual reports of international tourist hotels. Empirical results show that the meta-efficiency and technology gap (TG) of foreign-owned hotels are better than those of domestic hotels. In addition, employees of foreign-owned hotels are more productive than those of domestic hotels. The findings imply that Taiwan’s tourist hotels should structure a plan to augment their operating scales. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Consumption and Financial Development)
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Open AccessArticle
Do Political Connections Affect the Conservative Financial Reporting of Family Firms?
Sustainability 2019, 11(20), 5563; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11205563 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
This paper investigates the effect of political connections on the association between family firms and conservative financial reporting. While family firms have incentives to reduce agency and litigation-related costs by means of conservative reporting, firms with political connections tend to have opaque financial [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the effect of political connections on the association between family firms and conservative financial reporting. While family firms have incentives to reduce agency and litigation-related costs by means of conservative reporting, firms with political connections tend to have opaque financial reporting, which enable them to engage in rent-seeking activities. Using data for Taiwanese listed firms between 1996 and 2012, the final sample observations were 13,877 firm-year observations from a population of 21,393 firm-year observations. We found that political connections weaken the positive relationship between family ownership and conservative financial reporting. This suggests that politically connected family firms make fewer demands for conservative financial reporting. This study contributes to the literature on how political connections affect the family owners’ reporting incentives. Policy makers may consider political connections as an essential factor with respect to establishing governance practice in family firms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Consumption and Financial Development)
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