Special Issue "Toward Smart Cities: Zero Energy Buildings"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Annarita Ferrante
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture, Università di Bologna, 40126 Bologna BO, Italy
Dr. Giovanni Semprini

Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento, 2 - 40136, Bologna, Italy
Dr. Margarita Niki Assimakopoulos
Website
Guest Editor
University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Dr. Niki Gaitani

Guest Editor
Research Centre on Zero Emission Neighbourhoods in Smart Cities (FME ZEN), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Sentralbygg 1, Gløshaugen, Alfred Getz vei 3, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is widely acknowledged that, in the years to come, one of the key challenges to the decarbonization of the building stock is to improve, demonstrate, and validate key, radical, and groundbreaking technologies for energy-efficient buildings and neighborhoods based on affordable zero-energy and even energy-plus buildings. This means that feasible solutions for energy saving, production, transfer, and storage should be provided to change the current conditions where the majority of buildings is highly energy-inefficient and where the zero- or plus-energy concepts are often limited to a niche market of newly conceived, stand-alone constructions.

This Special Issue of Sustainability aims at collecting contributions to shift these current gaps into opportunities for future developments in energy efficiency and zero energy even of energy-plus buildings. To achieve this, energy- and non-energy-related benefits should be considered and analyzed for the society and the building construction market, including the impact on the environment and the mitigation of the local climate change.

Main TOPICs:

  • Zero-energy and energy-plus solutions in buildings and neighborhoods;
  • Cost-effective solutions and reduction of the payback time of energy efficiency measures;
  • Increasing quality and attractiveness of constructions at the urban and building scale;
  • Measures, tools, and strategies for the nearly Zero Energy in new and existing buildings;
  • Punctual densification policy to foster the investments in deep renovation of the existing built environment;
  • Case studies and best practices for energy-plus and zero-energy buildings; possible synergies between new and existing buildings; Energy production, energy storage, energy transfer at the different scales of the built environment.

Dr. Annarita Ferrante
Dr. Giovanni Semprini
Dr. Margarita Niki Assimakopoulos
Dr. Niki Gaitani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Smart cities and planning
  • Zero energy districts
  • Plus energy buildings
  • Energy efficiency

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Green Wall Design Approach Towards Energy Performance and Indoor Comfort Improvement: A Case Study in Athens
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3772; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093772 - 06 May 2020
Abstract
In the 21st century, sustainable development is high on the international agenda, with the implementation of green walls contributing significantly to achieving environmental and social benefits, mainly in the frame of sustainable improvement of the building sector. The installation of a greening system [...] Read more.
In the 21st century, sustainable development is high on the international agenda, with the implementation of green walls contributing significantly to achieving environmental and social benefits, mainly in the frame of sustainable improvement of the building sector. The installation of a greening system can provide engineered solutions for stormwater management and climate change mitigation at both the urban and building level. This facilitates improving indoor comfort conditions and reducing energy needs. In order to improve the features of products and to facilitate the implementation of a proper technical standard, this paper proposes a critical bibliographic analysis of more recent scientific works. Moreover, by means of a numerical model of an existing single-family apartment, placed in the Mediterranean climate zone, a building envelope refurbishment with a living wall is carried out. A parametric analysis provides evidence for the application of different plants’ types and insulation materials. The results are analyzed considering the energy needs, the thermo-hygrometric comfort, and the outdoor surface temperature variation of the building envelope, emphasizing that a multi-criteria design approach is needed for green vertical systems. The paper provides data and an approach useful for designers and researchers in the evaluation and optimization of the performance of greening systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toward Smart Cities: Zero Energy Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle
Cost-Optimal Net Zero Energy Communities
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2432; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062432 - 20 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The objective of this research is to study the cost of Net Zero Energy (NZE) communities of different urban scales and densities, while taking into consideration the local climate and the type of buildings in the community. A comprehensive model was developed for [...] Read more.
The objective of this research is to study the cost of Net Zero Energy (NZE) communities of different urban scales and densities, while taking into consideration the local climate and the type of buildings in the community. A comprehensive model was developed for this purpose, with which the cost-optimal configuration of renewable energy-related technologies for an NZE community can be identified. To validate the model, data from two case studies that differed in their climate and building types were used. The results of this study contribute to a better understanding of the implications of NZE requirements for urban planning. An increase in the scale of a community was found to reduce energy costs, up to a certain point. Urban density, on the other hand, was found to have a more complex impact on costs, which depends on the local climate of the community and the subsequent energy demand. This underlines the importance of addressing the technological design of energy systems at the initial stage of the urban planning of energy-efficient communities, before the urban density, the unbuilt areas and the building types are set. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toward Smart Cities: Zero Energy Buildings)
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