Special Issue "The Dynamic Relationship between Energy Consumption, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions, and Economic Growth"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nikolaos Antonakakis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Business and Management, Webster Vienna Private University, Praterstraße 23, 1020 Wien, Austria
Interests: time series analysis; data mining; finance; management; econometrics; tourism
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The increasing threat of global warming and climate change has been a major, worldwide, ongoing concern for more than two decades. Global warming is being caused by the ever-increasing concentration of greenhouse gases (GHG), as well as other anthropogenic activities. Key factors that lead to increased GHG emissions are, among others, economic activity and energy usage.

As a consequence, the link among energy consumption, emissions, and economic growth has received considerable attention over the years from both policy makers and researchers, as the achievement of both environmental sustainability and sustainable development have gradually become major global concerns. The interest in this field has been further escalated due to the rather intricate character of this particular nexus, both from a theoretical and an empirical perspective.

The results of the existing literature on the abovementioned nexus are still contested, potentially due to differences in time-periods and country-data used, different econometric approaches and/or the omitted variable bias, as well as using static versus dynamic analysis and aggregated (total) energy consumption data versus disaggregated (e.g. oil, coal, natural gas, renewable) energy consumption data.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to collect research articles dedicated to the dynamic relationships among energy consumption, emissions, and the economic growth nexus. A special (but not exclusive) focus is put on the following topics:

  • Modeling the dynamic casual relationships among energy consumption, emissions, and the economic growth nexus based on recently-developed econometric techniques;
  • Examination of attainability/feasibility of achieving both economic development and environmental sustainability requirements;
  • Use of alternative proxies of economic growth and additional pollutants, as well as controlling for potential exogenous factors in the examination of the abovementioned nexus.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Nikolaos Antonakakis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • economic growth
  • greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions
  • energy consumption
  • dynamic causality
  • co-integration
  • sustainable economic development
  • environmental sustainability
  • environmental Kuznets curve (EKC)
  • fossil fuels
  • renewable energy
  • nuclear power

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Impact of Foreign Direct Investment on Environmental Performance
Sustainability 2019, 11(13), 3538; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11133538 - 27 Jun 2019
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 2145
Abstract
The paper presents the results of a study that attempts to investigate the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on environmental performance (EP) by constructing a panel quantile regression model. Based on panel data from 1990 to 2014, this study contributes to evaluate [...] Read more.
The paper presents the results of a study that attempts to investigate the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on environmental performance (EP) by constructing a panel quantile regression model. Based on panel data from 1990 to 2014, this study contributes to evaluate the EP of each of the 40 countries using a directional slack-based model considering undesirable output. Our findings reveal several key conclusions: first, FDI has an insignificant influence on EP for the full sample. Second, the impact of FDI on EP between developed and developing countries exists heterogeneity. Furthermore, there is heterogeneity regarding the effect of FDI on EP at different quantiles of EP in developed countries. Specifically, in the developed countries, the effect is statistically insignificant at the lower quantile of EP, then it turns significantly positive at the middle and high quantile, and the positive effect rises with the increase of quantiles of EP. Finally, based on the conclusions of quantitative analysis, some important policy recommendations are proposed: different governments ought to enact different strategies for the introduction of FDI, according to different development situations of different countries. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Characterizing the Embodied Carbon Emissions Flows and Ecological Relationships among Four Chinese Megacities and Other Provinces
Sustainability 2019, 11(9), 2591; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11092591 - 05 May 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1042
Abstract
China has been undergoing a rapid process of urbanization. The urbanization rate, increased from 35% in 2000 to 59.58% in 2018, and is expected to increase to 70% by 2030. As Chinese cities consumed approximately 77% of China’s total energy and emitted about [...] Read more.
China has been undergoing a rapid process of urbanization. The urbanization rate, increased from 35% in 2000 to 59.58% in 2018, and is expected to increase to 70% by 2030. As Chinese cities consumed approximately 77% of China’s total energy and emitted about 81% of all carbon emissions in 2017, it has become increasingly necessary to quantitatively analyze city-level carbon emissions and related issues. The present study adopted single regional and multi-regional input-output (MRIO) models to analyze the features of four Chinese municipalities (Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai and Chongqing) and calculate their embodied carbon emissions (ECE). In addition, we used ecological relationship concepts to analyze the relationships between those municipalities and other regions based on ECE flows through an ecological network analysis (ENA) model. The results show that all four megacities were net importers of ECE, and their imported ECE typically flowed from nearby geographic regions. In addition, exploitation was the main ecological relationship between these four megacities and China’s other regions. Knowing the detailed data related to ECE, ECE flows and the ecological relationships among these megacities could help policymakers establish more comprehensive environment-related policies, which are crucial for achieving sustainable development targets. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Non-Linear Effect of Financial Support on Energy Efficiency: Evidence from China
Sustainability 2019, 11(7), 1959; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11071959 - 02 Apr 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1187
Abstract
This study examines the non-linear effect of financial support on energy efficiency for 30 provinces in China, over the period 2003 to 2016. Specifically, we find that technological progress is a key factor in improving energy efficiency, regardless of the transition variable or [...] Read more.
This study examines the non-linear effect of financial support on energy efficiency for 30 provinces in China, over the period 2003 to 2016. Specifically, we find that technological progress is a key factor in improving energy efficiency, regardless of the transition variable or sample chosen. The non-linear effects of the support of different financial sectors on energy efficiency are different. Banks have the greatest positive impact on energy efficiency, but as economic and financial development levels increase, this impact will diminish. The impact of securities on energy efficiency is contrary to bank support, because as the level of economic and financial development increases, the impact of securities on energy efficiency will shift from negative to positive. The impact of insurance support on energy efficiency is not significant. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop