Special Issue "City and Port: Waterfront Integration for Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2023.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. João Pedro Costa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Lisbon, School of Architecture, CIAUD
Interests: waterfronts; climate change adaptation; spatial planning
Prof. Dr. Maria José Andrade Marques
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Malaga, School of Architecture, CIAUD
Interests: waterfronts;port areas;tourism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cities and ports have a long history of interaction, and waterfront areas have been the living spaces that bear witness to this relation. In response to evolving socioeconomic paradigms and to the emergence of new societal problems, this relation has gone through periods with diferent degrees of tension. The production and regeneration of waterfront areas is a reflection of this, as they sway between being areas of segregation or integration.

After decades of transformation, when citizens rediscovered their waterfront areas and port areas became more specialized, sustainable approaches now address a large scope of issues, such as: the impacts of touristification; cruise ships and the city; public space and recreation; green infrastructure; circular economies; light mobility; repurposing (industrial and historical) heritage sites; climate change adaptation; environment; memory and local identity.
In present-day (post-)COVID-19 times, new uncertainties are emerging, issues might need to be reshaped, and new opportunities will need their own space. The debate on the sustainability of these waterfront territories faces new directions.
Over time, waterfronts have answered common problems by sharing experiences, and today, this is ever more relevant. We invite you to participate in this discussion on contemporary cities and ports: How does waterfront integration contribute to sustainability?

Articles can be proposed under one of the following six topics:

  1. Heritage sites and waterfront strategies;
  2. Responsible tourism, culture, and local identity;
  3. Mobility, public space, and environment;
  4. Waterfronts and climate change;
  5. Port development and sustainability;
  6. Sustainability in the port-city: portraits (case-studies).

This Special Issue shall reopen the debate on contemporary waterfronts, and we would like to invite you to participate in it.

Prof. Dr. João Pedro Costa
Prof. Dr. Maria José Andrade Marques
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • City and port
  • Waterfront
  • Port–city Integration
  • Sustainability
  • Heritage sites
  • City planning
  • Tourism
  • Culture and memory
  • Climate change adaptation
  • Port development
  • Port sustainability
  • Cruise ships

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Exhaust Emissions and Fuel Consumption Analysis on the Example of an Increasing Number of HGVs in the Port City
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7428; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137428 - 02 Jul 2021
Viewed by 316
Abstract
Due to the increase in cargo handling in ports, and the thereby increase of trucking directly associated with them, this article examines the impact of heavy goods vehicles generated by the port facilities on the environment. The article determines what is feasible to [...] Read more.
Due to the increase in cargo handling in ports, and the thereby increase of trucking directly associated with them, this article examines the impact of heavy goods vehicles generated by the port facilities on the environment. The article determines what is feasible to limit the percentage increase in the number of HGVs generated by the port areas such as container terminals or mass, which will result in a significant increase in emissions in the port city. In this study, five intersections were analyzed using micro-simulation to determine exhaust emissions such as CO, NOx, VOC, and fuel consumption. The analysis was made on the example of the port city of Gdynia in Poland, using the actual data. The use of the PTV Vissim tool made it possible to obtain the result data from the simulation of ten variants with a variant representing the current state. The results indicate that increasing the number of HGVs generated by port areas by 40% will make a significant difference in exhaust emissions. The obtained results can be useful for controlling the level of environmental pollution as predictive models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City and Port: Waterfront Integration for Sustainability)
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Article
Parameters Affecting Noise Emitted by Ships Moving in Port Areas
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8742; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208742 - 21 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 882
Abstract
Only recently has noise been considered in the assessment of the sustainability of port infrastructures, after decades of unawareness. INTERREG Maritime projects unveiled problems that have been neglected so far, such as the lack of proper regulation and noise exposure assessments for citizens. [...] Read more.
Only recently has noise been considered in the assessment of the sustainability of port infrastructures, after decades of unawareness. INTERREG Maritime projects unveiled problems that have been neglected so far, such as the lack of proper regulation and noise exposure assessments for citizens. While it is true that a port area includes a huge variety of possible noise sources, very few of them have been characterized from an acoustical point of view. INTERREG projects have boosted research in the field, and previous studies have dealt with noise produced by moving ships in ports. The present work starts from a previous measurement campaign used to obtain broadband and 1/3-octave-band noise emissions of moving ships, and it aims to explain their uncertainties. More than a month’s worth of continuous acoustic measurements and video recordings were deeply analyzed in order to obtain an input database that is as precise as possible. A multiple regression analysis was performed in order to understand the influence that parameters such as minimum distance, speed, and draught have on ships’ noise emissions, which were calculated using pass-by measurements, with a special focus on ferries. The minimum distance of each ship’s passage from the microphone was measured using a video recording with an innovative methodology, providing results with 3 m of uncertainty. Knowing which parameter is more influential would help in planning proper measurements for monitoring or for drafting correct guidelines. Draught was determined to be uninfluential in ferries’ noise emissions, while the minimum distance and speed relations were estimated and accounted for in the calculation of a refined sound power level. From a spectrum point of view, the frequencies from 500 Hz to 2.5 kHz were determined to be those that contributed the most to the noise produced by the transit of a ship, and they vary with speed. With the studied corrections, different ferry models resulted in similar noise emissions. The standard deviation of noise emitted was reduced by 0.5 dB (A), and the average was also improved by positioning the ships’ flow at the correct average minimum distance. Furthermore, the right placement of a source is also important in the acoustic mapping phase for a correct evaluation of the propagation of noise at a distance. The use of more precise input data is important for improving the output of acoustic propagation models during the assessment of port noise in the surrounding areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City and Port: Waterfront Integration for Sustainability)
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Article
Climate Adaptation Plans in the Context of Coastal Settlements: The Case of Portugal
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8559; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208559 - 16 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 733
Abstract
The impact of sea-level rise on coastal towns is expected to be a major challenge, with millions of people exposed. The climate-induced risk assessment of coastal areas subject to flooding plays an essential role in planning effective measures for adaptation plans. However, in [...] Read more.
The impact of sea-level rise on coastal towns is expected to be a major challenge, with millions of people exposed. The climate-induced risk assessment of coastal areas subject to flooding plays an essential role in planning effective measures for adaptation plans. However, in European legislation, as well as in the regional plans adopted by the member states, there is no clear reference to urban settlement, as this concept is variable and difficult to categorise from the policy perspective. This lack of knowledge makes it complicated to implement efficient adaptation plans. This research examines the presence of the issue in Portugal’s coastal settlements, the European coastal area most vulnerable to rising sea levels, using the case of seashore streets as the most exposed waterfront public urban areas. Using the morphometric classification of the urban fabric, we analyse the relationship between urban typology and legislative macro-areas aimed at providing integrated adaptation plans. The study suggests that there is only a minimal relationship between the proposed classification and the geographical zones currently identified in coastal planning policies. Such incongruence suggests the need for change, as the policy should be able to provide a response plan tailored to the specificities of urban areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City and Port: Waterfront Integration for Sustainability)
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