sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Sustainable Maritime Transportation: Risk Management and Accident Analysis

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2024) | Viewed by 7537

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Maritime Transportation and Management Engineering, Faculty of Marine Science, Ordu University, Fatsa 52400, Ordu, Turkey
Interests: maritime safety; accident analysis; human factors; risk assessment; maritime transportation

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Senior Lecturer in Maritime Management, School of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK
Interests: design, operation, and safety of maritime engineering systems such as: ships, oil and gas installations, and offshore renewable energy structures; marine asset integrity monitoring; management of said energy structures
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Maritime accidents have a low-to-moderate probability of occurring, but fairly highly devastating material and moral consequences. This indicates that the level of the risk (probability × consequence) is always high in the sea. One of the main ways to reduce these losses is official accident investigation and reporting, which started with the Titanic accident and is based on the principle of learning from past events and preventing them from happening in the future. Analyzing maritime accidents is one of the effective approaches to reducing the risks of maritime transportation. Devastating maritime accidents are one of the biggest obstacles to safe and sustainable maritime trade. The complex social, technical and psychological structure of the human element complicates the analysis of accidents and events. Increasing marine traffic on sea routes increases the chance of risks that threaten the safety of navigation. Maritime accidents cause the loss of ships and cargo, but also the loss of lives and environmental disasters. Despite additional measures taken with developing technology, the target level of accident reduction was not achieved. For this reason, it is necessary to reveal the fixed and variable risks that cause maritime accident occurrences and to determine the current risk control options for ensuring safety and sustainability in maritime trade.

This Special Issue deals with issues related to maritime safety and accidents, which are among the biggest obstacles to sustainable shipping. The articles should address the risks that threaten maritime transportation. Topics selected for the Special Issue may include: the occurrence of accidents and injuries; the design, implementation and evaluation of measures; modeling and statistical analysis of accident data; policy, planning and decision making in security; assessments, management and communication of risks; human behaviors and safety; human reliability; operator decision support systems; software reliability; methods and applications of automatic fault detection and diagnosis; safety culture; accident investigation and management.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but not limited to) the following:

- Marine accidents;

- Risk analysis;

- Safety assessments;

- Human reliability;

- Human factor;

- System safety;

- Accident analysis methods;

- Maritime safety.

I/We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Özkan Uǧurlu
Dr. Sean Loughney
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine accident
  • accident analysis
  • risk analysis
  • human factor/element

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

21 pages, 1934 KiB  
Article
Bayesian Network Analysis of Industrial Accident Risk for Fishers on Fishing Vessels Less Than 12 m in Length
by Seung-Hyun Lee, Su-Hyung Kim, Kyung-Jin Ryu and Yoo-Won Lee
Sustainability 2024, 16(10), 3977; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16103977 - 9 May 2024
Viewed by 577
Abstract
The Marine Stewardship Council estimates that approximately 38 million people worldwide work in fisheries, and more than one-third of the global population is dependent on aquatic products for protein, highlighting the importance of sustainable fisheries. The FISH Safety Foundation reports that 300 fishers [...] Read more.
The Marine Stewardship Council estimates that approximately 38 million people worldwide work in fisheries, and more than one-third of the global population is dependent on aquatic products for protein, highlighting the importance of sustainable fisheries. The FISH Safety Foundation reports that 300 fishers die every day. To achieve sustainable fisheries as a primary industry, the safety of human resources is of the utmost importance. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the International Labor Organization (ILO) have made efforts towards this goal, including the issuance of agreements and guidelines to reduce industrial accidents among fishing vessel workers. The criterion for applying these guidelines is usually a total ship length ≥12 m or ≥24 m. However, a vast majority of registered fishing vessels are <12 m long, and the fishers of these vessels suffer substantially more industrial accidents. Thus, we conducted a quantitative analysis of 1093 industrial accidents affecting fishers on fishing vessels <12 m in length, analyzed risk using a Bayesian network analysis (a method proposed by the Formal Safety Assessment of the IMO), and administered a questionnaire survey to a panel of experts in order to ascertain the risk for different types of industrial accidents and propose specific measures to reduce this risk. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 2623 KiB  
Article
Human Reliability Analysis for Fishing Vessels in Korea Using Cognitive Reliability and Error Analysis Method (CREAM)
by Donghun Lee, Hyungju Kim, Kwiyeon Koo and Sooyeon Kwon
Sustainability 2024, 16(9), 3780; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16093780 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 2577
Abstract
In this paper, we introduce a model designed to predict human error probability (HEP) in the context of fishing boat operations utilizing the cognitive reliability and error analysis method (CREAM). We conducted an analysis of potential accidents on fishing boats and calculated the [...] Read more.
In this paper, we introduce a model designed to predict human error probability (HEP) in the context of fishing boat operations utilizing the cognitive reliability and error analysis method (CREAM). We conducted an analysis of potential accidents on fishing boats and calculated the cognitive failure probability (CFP) for each identified accident. The common performance conditions (CPCs) from the original CREAM were adapted to better reflect the conditions on fishing boats, with the adapted CPCs’ validity confirmed through expert consultations. To apply CREAM, data were gathered via a survey of fishermen, with the uncertainty in the collected data addressed through the application of fuzzy set theory (FST). We then established a Bayesian network (BN) model to elucidate the relationship between the fuzzy data and HEP, utilizing a weighted sum algorithm to determine conditional probabilities within the BN. Both basic and extended versions of CREAM were applied to analyze the most common accidents among fishermen, calculating the CFP for each type of accident. According to our analysis, the poorer the dynamic CPC, the higher the probability that a fall accident will occur inside the boat due to human error, necessitating a countermeasure. The paper proposes safety enhancements for small fishing boats and illustrates the increased precision of human reliability analysis (HRA) models in forecasting human error by incorporating quantitative methods. It calls for further data collection and refinement of the model for more accurate operational risk assessments. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 3487 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Fishing Vessel Accidents and Suggestions for Safety Policy in South Korea from 2018 to 2022
by Hyungju Kim, Kwiyeon Koo, Hyunjeong Lim, Sooyeon Kwon and Yoowon Lee
Sustainability 2024, 16(9), 3537; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16093537 - 24 Apr 2024
Viewed by 538
Abstract
Commercial fishing, one of the most dangerous sectors globally and, particularly, in South Korea, faces fatal accident rates significantly exceeding other industries, and an urgent improvement in safety measures is necessary to reduce these numbers effectively. The main objective of this study is [...] Read more.
Commercial fishing, one of the most dangerous sectors globally and, particularly, in South Korea, faces fatal accident rates significantly exceeding other industries, and an urgent improvement in safety measures is necessary to reduce these numbers effectively. The main objective of this study is to analyse fishing vessel accidents in South Korea and present the direction of safety policy for fishing vessels based on the lessons learnt from previous accidents, and, ultimately, to contribute to reduce fishing vessel accidents. For this purpose, we have analysed the marine accident data from the last five years provided by the Korea Maritime Safety Tribunal (KMST), the statistical yearbook of oceans and fisheries provided by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries (MOF), and the statistical survey of marine fisheries provided by the Korean Statistical Information Service (KOSIS), using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. After thorough review and analysis of the accident data, we have proposed seven suggestions for the direction of future safety policy for fishing vessels in South Korea: adopt international safety benchmarks, focus on occupational and collision accidents, tailor safety measures to vessel size and age, enhance lookout practices to prevent collisions, implement comprehensive strategies to mitigate human errors, and address communication issues among Korean and international crews. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 1203 KiB  
Article
Safety–Security Analysis of Maritime Surveillance Systems in Critical Marine Areas
by Batu Şengül, Fatih Yılmaz and Özkan Uğurlu
Sustainability 2023, 15(23), 16381; https://doi.org/10.3390/su152316381 - 28 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1593
Abstract
In today’s world, wherein more than 80% of world trade is carried out by maritime routes, the safety and security of the seas where this trade takes place is of vast importance for nations and the international community. For this reason, ensuring the [...] Read more.
In today’s world, wherein more than 80% of world trade is carried out by maritime routes, the safety and security of the seas where this trade takes place is of vast importance for nations and the international community. For this reason, ensuring the sustainable safety and security of the seas has become an integral part of the mission of all maritime-related entities. Using big data extracted from the seas and maritime activities into meaningful information with artificial intelligence applications and developing applications that can be used in maritime surveillance will be of great importance for augmenting maritime safety and security. In this article, data sources which can be used by a maritime surveillance system based on big data and artificial intelligence technologies and which can be established around sensitive sea areas and critical coastal facilities, are identified and a model proposal using this maritime big data is put forward. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 7387 KiB  
Article
Identification of the Most Important Events to the Occurrence of a Disaster Using Maritime Examples
by Dorota Chybowska, Leszek Chybowski, Jarosław Myśków and Jerzy Manerowski
Sustainability 2023, 15(13), 10613; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151310613 - 5 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1565
Abstract
Previous studies on maritime disasters have noted the importance of searching for their causal factors in the analysis of different types of vessels and various regions where accidents have occurred. The main objective of the study that this article presents was to develop [...] Read more.
Previous studies on maritime disasters have noted the importance of searching for their causal factors in the analysis of different types of vessels and various regions where accidents have occurred. The main objective of the study that this article presents was to develop a new approach to modelling and causal analysis of the course of maritime disasters in order to provide a holistic evaluation of this phenomenon. The novel approach adopted to support the thesis combined event network analysis and fault tree analysis (used in functional analysis for modelling the structures of systems) in the process analysis. The authors advanced a thesis that, in the studied population of disasters, there were dominant classes of basic events in each phase of the process during the course of a disaster (distinguished by means of an event network). Thirty maritime disasters that occurred between 1912 and 2019 were selected for quantitative and qualitative analyses. In each disaster, the different phases of its course were distinguished: latent, initiating, escalating, critical, and energy release. A total of 608 basic events were identified in the population, enabling the identification and characterisation of 44 classes of events. The importance of the events in each of the phases was calculated by means of importance measures. The findings confirmed the thesis. At the same time, an analysis of the importance of basic events in each phase revealed that the most common basic events are not always the most important. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop