Special Issue "Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Exercise"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Edward Jo
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Associate Professor of Exercise Physiology and Metabolism, College of Science, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA 91768, USA; Director of the Cal Poly Human Performance Research Lab
Interests: exercise physiology; sports science; performance nutrition; muscle physiology; metabolism
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues:

It is with great enthusiasm that I am announcing a Special Issue of Sports (Basel) with the goal of examining the area of skeletal muscle metabolism in sport and exercise. Topics of interest include muscle bioenergetics, aerobic adaptations to training, exercise-induced fatigue, performance nutrition, skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and exercise-induced muscle damage and recovery. We welcome original research, meta-analysis, reviews, and brief reports.

Prof. Edward Jo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • skeletal muscle
  • metabolism
  • hypertrophy
  • bioenergetics
  • training
  • conditioning
  • strength

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Post-Exercise Recovery Following 30-Day Supplementation of Trans-Resveratrol and Polyphenol-Enriched Extracts
Sports 2019, 7(10), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7100226 - 20 Oct 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 30-day consumption of trans-resveratrol and polyphenol-enriched extracts on indices of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and performance following eccentric-loaded resistance exercise (ECRE). Methods: Following 30 days of resveratrol-polyphenol (RES) (n = [...] Read more.
Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 30-day consumption of trans-resveratrol and polyphenol-enriched extracts on indices of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and performance following eccentric-loaded resistance exercise (ECRE). Methods: Following 30 days of resveratrol-polyphenol (RES) (n = 10) or placebo control (CTL) (n = 12) supplementation, subjects performed a bout of ECRE to induce EIMD. EIMD biomarkers, perceived soreness, pain threshold and tolerance, range of motion, and performance were measured before and 24 and 48 h after ECRE. Results: CTL subjects demonstrated increased soreness at 24 (p = 0.02) and 48 h (p = 0.03) post-ECRE, while RES subjects reported increased soreness at 24 h post-ECRE (p = 0.0003). CTL subjects exhibited decreased pain threshold in the vastus lateralis at 24 h post-ECRE (p = 0.03). CTL subjects also displayed decreased pain tolerance in the vastus intermedius at 24 h post-ECRE (p = 0.03) and the vastus lateralis at 24 (p = 0.003) and 48 h (p = 0.003). RES participants showed no change in pain threshold or tolerance from baseline. CTL subjects showed a decrease in mean (p = 0.04) and peak power (p = 0.04) at 24 h post-ECRE, while RES participants demonstrated no changes from baseline. No between-group differences were observed for the changes in serum creatine kinase. Serum C-reactive protein increased similarly in both groups at 24 h post-ECRE (p < 0.002), remaining elevated in CTL subjects while RES participants demonstrated a decline from 24 to 48 h (p = 0.04). Serum interleukin 6 increased at 24 h post-ECRE in both groups (p < 0.003) followed by a decrease from 24 to 48 h, returning to baseline levels only for RES subjects. Conclusion: Trans-resveratrol and polyphenol-enriched extract supplementation may support the attenuation of soreness and inflammation and improve performance recovery following ECRE without modulation of indirect biomarkers of EIMD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Exercise)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Chronic Fish Oil Consumption with Resistance Training Improves Grip Strength, Physical Function, and Blood Pressure in Community-Dwelling Older Adults
Sports 2019, 7(7), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7070167 - 09 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Fish oil (FO) has received great attention for its health-enhancing properties. However, its potential synergistic effects with resistance training (RT) are not well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of FO supplementation during 12-weeks of RT on handgrip [...] Read more.
Fish oil (FO) has received great attention for its health-enhancing properties. However, its potential synergistic effects with resistance training (RT) are not well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of FO supplementation during 12-weeks of RT on handgrip strength, physical function, and blood pressure (BP) in community-dwelling older adults. Twenty-eight healthy older adults (10 males, 18 females; 66.5 ± 5.0 years) were randomly assigned to three groups: Control (CON), resistance training (RT), resistance training with FO (RTFO). Handgrip strength, physical function [five times sit-to-stand (5T-STS), timed up and go (TUG), 6-m walk (6MW), 30-s sit-to-stand (30S-STS)], and BP were measured pre- and post-intervention. ANOVA was used with significance set at P ≤ 0.05. Handgrip strength significantly increased in RT (+5.3%) and RTFO (+9.4%) but decreased in CON (−3.9%). All physical function outcomes increased in RT and RTFO. CON exhibited significantly decreased TUG and 30S-STS with no change in 5T-STS and 6MW. BP substantially decreased only in RTFO, systolic blood pressure (−7.8 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (−4.5 mmHg), mean arterial pressure (−5.6 mmHg), while no change was found in CON and RT. Chronic RT enhanced strength and physical function, while FO consumption combined with RT improved BP in community-dwelling older adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Exercise)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Effects of a Multi-Ingredient Performance Supplement Combined with Resistance Training on Exercise Volume, Muscular Strength, and Body Composition
Sports 2019, 7(6), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7060152 - 25 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The effects of a multi-ingredient performance supplement (MIPS) incorporating a mixture of branched chain amino acids, beta-alanine, glutamine, creatine, and piperine on resistance training (RT)-induced adaptations remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of this investigational MIPS [...] Read more.
The effects of a multi-ingredient performance supplement (MIPS) incorporating a mixture of branched chain amino acids, beta-alanine, glutamine, creatine, and piperine on resistance training (RT)-induced adaptations remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of this investigational MIPS during six weeks of RT on performance and body composition. Thirty recreationally trained males and females were recruited for this pair-matched, double-blind, placebo-controlled investigation. Subjects were assigned to consume either an experimental MIPS (MIPS) (n = 15) or a placebo (PLA) (n = 15) concurrently with a six-week periodized RT program. Body composition, one-repetition maximum (1RM), and muscular power were assessed at pre- and post-training. Weekly relative volume load was compared between groups. The MIPS and PLA groups demonstrated a significant increase in total body mass (MIPS = +2.9 ± 1.3%; PLA = +2.5 ± 1.7%) and lean mass (MIPS = +5.0 ± 2.1%; PLA = +3.1 ± 1.9%) (p < 0.001) with no changes in fat mass. There were no group × time interactions for any of the body composition measures. Both groups demonstrated similar improvements in maximum strength for the back squat, bench press, and deadlift as well as lower body power from pre- to post-training (p < 0.001). Within the limitations of the current investigation, results failed to demonstrate the benefits of the experimental MIPS for muscular strength and body composition across six weeks of RT compared to PLA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Exercise)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Acute Effects of Foam Rolling on Fatigue-Related Impairments of Muscular Performance
Sports 2018, 6(4), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040112 - 05 Oct 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of self-myofascial release (MFR) via foam rolling immediately following strenuous activity on acute fatigue-related impairments of muscular performance. Healthy male (n = 16) and female (n = 9) subjects visited the [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of self-myofascial release (MFR) via foam rolling immediately following strenuous activity on acute fatigue-related impairments of muscular performance. Healthy male (n = 16) and female (n = 9) subjects visited the laboratory three separate times. During visit 1, subjects were familiarized with performance testing procedures and the foam rolling and fatigue protocols. For visits 2 and 3, subjects were (T1) assessed for vertical jump height, velocity, and power and dynamic reaction time (DRT). Subjects then performed the exercise fatigue protocol, followed by either a foam rolling treatment (MFR) or seated rest (CON). Immediately after, subjects repeated the performance tests (T2). CON resulted in a greater percent decline from T1–T2 for average power (p = 0.03), average velocity (p = 0.02), and peak power (p = 0.03) than the MFR treatment. No between-treatment differences were detected for %∆ vertical jump height (p = 0.14) or DRT (p = 0.20). According to magnitude-based inference analysis, MFR is likely beneficial in attenuating fatigue-induced kinematic decrements (i.e., power and velocity). Based on magnitude-based inference analysis, MFR is “possibly beneficial” with respect to mitigating acute fatigue-related impairment of jump height and dynamic reaction time. Results demonstrate the plausible short-term benefits of foam rolling on muscular performance decrements associated with acute muscular fatigue from exercise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Exercise)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Nutrition Recommendations for Bodybuilders in the Off-Season: A Narrative Review
Sports 2019, 7(7), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7070154 - 26 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Many nutrition practices often used by bodybuilders lack scientific support and can be detrimental to health. Recommendations during the dieting phase are provided in the scientific literature, but little attention has been devoted to bodybuilders during the off-season phase. During the off-season phase, [...] Read more.
Many nutrition practices often used by bodybuilders lack scientific support and can be detrimental to health. Recommendations during the dieting phase are provided in the scientific literature, but little attention has been devoted to bodybuilders during the off-season phase. During the off-season phase, the goal is to increase muscle mass without adding unnecessary body fat. This review evaluated the scientific literature and provides nutrition and dietary supplement recommendations for natural bodybuilders during the off-season phase. A hyper-energetic diet (~10–20%) should be consumed with a target weight gain of ~0.25–0.5% of bodyweight/week for novice/intermediate bodybuilders. Advanced bodybuilders should be more conservative with the caloric surplus and weekly weight gain. Sufficient protein (1.6–2.2 g/kg/day) should be consumed with optimal amounts 0.40–0.55 g/kg per meal and distributed evenly throughout the day (3–6 meals) including within 1–2 hours pre- and post-training. Fat should be consumed in moderate amounts (0.5–1.5 g/kg/day). Remaining calories should come from carbohydrates with focus on consuming sufficient amounts (≥3–5 g/kg/day) to support energy demands from resistance exercise. Creatine monohydrate (3–5 g/day), caffeine (5–6 mg/kg), beta-alanine (3–5 g/day) and citrulline malate (8 g/day) might yield ergogenic effects that can be beneficial for bodybuilders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Exercise)
Back to TopTop