Special Issue "Physical Activity for Health in Youth"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lorayne Woodfield
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health and Behavioural Sciences, Newman University Birmingham, UK
Interests: physical activity; obesity; health; young people
Dr. Emma Powell
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, Newman University Birmingham, UK
Dr. Peter Collins
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Wolverhampton, UK

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Current levels of physical activity during childhood and adulthood are insufficient to maintain good health, so much so that physical inactivity is recognised as the fourth leading cause of global mortality. Furthermore, the prevalence of obesity- and inactivity-related health conditions, such as type II diabetes mellitus is increasing among youth populations. Physical inactivity during childhood is of particular interest as participation in physical activity during childhood can provide a number of physical, social and psychological benefits, and patterns of physical activity and healthy lifestyles acquired during childhood and adolescence are more likely to be maintained throughout the life-span.

Youth physical activity can occur in a variety of different settings through participation in structured forms of physical activity (such as physical education lessons, and school and community sport) and unstructured activities (including active commuting and freedom to play). As such, homes, schools, and community settings all have a role to play in contributing to, and increasing children’s and adolescents’ physical activity participation.

The aim of this Special Issue is to increase understanding of the associations between physical activity and health in youth with special consideration to the contributions made by different environments and organisations to physical activity participation. It is hoped that the sharing of knowledge may inform policy and practice to provide greater opportunities for children and adolescents to be physically active, which will benefit their health and life chances.

Dr. Lorayne Woodfield
Dr. Emma Powell
Dr. Peter Collins
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Exercise
  • Sport
  • Sedentary behaviour
  • Health
  • Well-being
  • Obesity
  • Children
  • Adolescents
  • Youth
  • Environment
  • School
  • Home

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Does Perception of Motor Competence Mediate Associations between Motor Competence and Physical Activity in Early Years Children?
Sports 2019, 7(4), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7040077 - 01 Apr 2019
Abstract
Objectives: To examine if the relationship between physical activity (PA) and actual motor competence (MC) in British early years children is mediated by their perceived MC. Design: Cross-sectional convenience observational study. Methodology: MC was assessed with six locomotor skills (LC) and six object-control [...] Read more.
Objectives: To examine if the relationship between physical activity (PA) and actual motor competence (MC) in British early years children is mediated by their perceived MC. Design: Cross-sectional convenience observational study. Methodology: MC was assessed with six locomotor skills (LC) and six object-control skills (OC) via the Test of Gross Motor Development-2. PA was measured via a wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer and PA grouped as daily total PA (TPA) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). Perceived MC was assessed using the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Acceptance for Young Children. A total of 38 children (63% male; 37% female) aged between 3 and 6 years (5.41 ± 0.69) completed all assessments. Mediating impacts of perceived MC on the relationships between PA and MC were explored via backwards mediation regressions. Results: There were no mediating impacts of perceived MC on the relationship between PA and actual MC. Conclusions: The relationship between actual MC and PA is not mediated by perceived MC in a small sample of British early years childhood. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity for Health in Youth)
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