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Full-Field Optical Measurement Techniques for Damage Assessment

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2020) | Viewed by 7385

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
InViLab Research Group, Faculty of Applied Engineering, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp, Belgium
Interests: optical measurement techniques; metrology; laser Doppler vibrometry; optical fiber sensors; computer vision; machine vision; digital image correlation; non-destructive testing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Mechanics, Smart Sensors & Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece
Interests: development of "health monitoring" methodologies for assessment of deterioration and life prediction of technological materials and structures undergoing environmental aging; development of advanced non-destructive methods (ultrasound, acoustic microscopy, nonlinear acoustics, lock-in thermography, nano-microscopy) for the characterization of metal alloys, coatings, composite materials with a metal and ceramic matrix, nano-structured and intelligent materials; study of the mechanical behavior of materials (crack growth, local plastic deformation, low and high cycle fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue, micro-friction fatigue, creep, corrosion)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

 Dear Colleagues,

The ability to detect damage to components or infrastructure at an early stage is essential in many application fields, including aeronautics, wind turbines, bridges, etc.

In the last decades, full-field optical measurement techniques have emerged. Full-field vibration measurement techniques like laser vibrometry, holography, shearography or digital image correlation are used to detect, locate and quantify damage through the high spatial resolution measurement data they deliver. These methods are used detect cracks, delaminations and wear in several types of materials. Camera-based techniques like infrared thermography and non-destructive testing are also used to detect other types of damage like corrosion, coating degradation, etc.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of the capabilities and limitations of optical measurement techniques for damage detection.

Both review articles and papers relating to the application of full-field optical measurement techniques for damage detection and/or damage assessment are solicited. Papers on innovative optical measurement techniques, optimized measurement set-ups, pre- and post-processing methods and novel detection techniques are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Steve Vanlanduit
Prof. Dr. Theodore E. Matikas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

Non-destructive testing, damage detection
Laser vibrometry
Holography, shearography
Digital image correlation
Infrared thermography
Hyperspectral imaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 4075 KiB  
Article
Non-Contact Damage Detection under Operational Conditions with Multipoint Laservibrometry
by Xiaodong Cao and Christian Rembe
Sensors 2020, 20(3), 732; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20030732 - 28 Jan 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3661
Abstract
Scanning laser–Doppler vibrometry (SLDV) can localize and visualize damages in mechanical structures. In order to enable scanning, it is necessary to repeat the vibration. Therefore, this technique is not suited to detect emerging hazards in working machinery that change the vibration behavior. A [...] Read more.
Scanning laser–Doppler vibrometry (SLDV) can localize and visualize damages in mechanical structures. In order to enable scanning, it is necessary to repeat the vibration. Therefore, this technique is not suited to detect emerging hazards in working machinery that change the vibration behavior. A common technique for such cases is monitoring the vibration excited by machine operation with accelerometers. This technique requires mechanical coupling between sensors and the measurement object, which influences the high-frequency vibration responses. However, in the low-frequency range, local damages do not shift resonances or distort operational deflection shapes (ODS) significantly. These alterations in the vibration behavior are tiny and hard to detect. This paper shows that multipoint laservibrometry (MPV) with laser excitation can measure these effects efficiently, and it further demonstrates that damages influence ODSs at frequencies above 20 kHz much stronger than at frequencies below 20 kHz. In addition, ODS-based damage indices are discussed; these are highly sensitive to minute visible changes of the ODSs. In order to enhance the sensitivity of hazard detection, the response vector assurance criterion value is computed and evaluated during operation. The capabilities and limitations of the methodology on the example of a cantilever with manually emerging damage are demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Full-Field Optical Measurement Techniques for Damage Assessment)
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10 pages, 2912 KiB  
Article
Pixelated Carrier Phase-Shifting Shearography Using Spatiotemporal Low-Pass Filtering Algorithm
by Peizheng Yan, Xiangwei Liu, Shuangle Wu, Fangyuan Sun, Qihan Zhao and Yonghong Wang
Sensors 2019, 19(23), 5185; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19235185 - 26 Nov 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2931
Abstract
Shearography has been widely used in non-destructive testing due to its advantages in providing full-field, high precision, real-time measurement. The study presents a pixelated carrier phase-shifting shearography using a pixelated micropolarizer array. Based on the shearography, a series of shearograms are captured and [...] Read more.
Shearography has been widely used in non-destructive testing due to its advantages in providing full-field, high precision, real-time measurement. The study presents a pixelated carrier phase-shifting shearography using a pixelated micropolarizer array. Based on the shearography, a series of shearograms are captured and phase maps corresponding to deformation are measured dynamically and continuously. Using the proposed spatiotemporal filtering algorithm in the complex domain, the set of phase maps are simultaneously low-pass filtered in the spatial and temporal domains, resulting in better phase quality than spatial low-pass filtering. By accumulating the temporally adjacent phase, the phase corresponding to large deformation can be evaluated; thus, large deformations can be accurately measured and protected from speckle noise, allowing internal defects to be easily identified. The capability of the proposed shearography is described by theoretical discussions and experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Full-Field Optical Measurement Techniques for Damage Assessment)
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