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Special Issue "Wearable Biomedical Sensors 2019"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Eiichi Tamiya

Nano-bioenginnering and Biosensor Lab, Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanobiotechnology; advanced biosensor; bioMEMS; cell-based device; biosensors for IoT
Guest Editor
Dr. Mun'delanji Vestergaard

Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima, Kagoshima Prefecture 890-8580, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: electrochemical and optical biosensors; nn-field application; bio-efficacy of natural products; biofunctional materials; bio-mimetic membrane sensors
Guest Editor
Dr. Patrick Degenaar

Newcastle University, United Kingdom, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Newcastle, United Kingdom
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Dr. Shin-ichi Wakida

Dupty Director, PhotoBIO-OIL National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan
E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensors have given us excellent tools for monitoring evidential biomarkers, which are related to medical diagnosis, healthcare, food safety and environmental monitoring. Biomarkers indicate molecular information, such as proteins, genes, metabolites, pathogens. Biosensors consist of a molecular recognition part and a transducer part in principle. Selective and sensitive monitoring is considered to be an advantageous aspect in biosensors. Miniaturization and nano technology are powerful and can produce smaller, highly-integrated and functional biosensors for shaping wearable devices. Wearable biosensors can be applied to non-invasive monitoring using sweat, tear, and saliva samples, which include good bioindicators. Implanted biosensor are available for semi-continuous monitoring of glucose for diabetic patients. Microneedle devices will be applied to painlessly monitor target biomarkers from skin. Biosensors can be operated using smartphones and pocket PCs connected to the Internet, the so-called Internet of Things (IoT). Needless to say, e-glass and e-watches are able to function as wearable devices, linking biosensors. Electrochemistry, photonics, electronics-based device would be reliable and reproductive for biosensors.  Wearable biomedical biosensors would contribute to good health and maintain a high activity in global aging communities. They also could produce on-site monitoring tools for developing areas, which have suffered from food and environmental pollution.

Dr. Eiichi Tamiya
Dr. Mun'delanji Vestergaard
Dr. Patrick Degenaar
Dr. Shin-ichi Wakida
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

Biomarkers; Healthcare; Medical Diagnosis; Food/environmental safety; e-health; Airborne monitoring; Pathogen monitoring; Immunosensors; DNA sensors; Breath; Sweat; Skin; Urine; Tear; Saliva; Drop of blood; Implantable; Microneedle; Electrochemical biosensors; Photonic biosensors; Mass biosensors; Wireless transmission; Flexible sensors; Watch type; Eye glass type; Patch type; Ring type; Smartphone; Pocket PC

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
A Wearable Wrist Band-Type System for Multimodal Biometrics Integrated with Multispectral Skin Photomatrix and Electrocardiogram Sensors
Sensors 2018, 18(8), 2738; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18082738
Received: 26 June 2018 / Revised: 10 August 2018 / Accepted: 17 August 2018 / Published: 20 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1916 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Multimodal biometrics are promising for providing a strong security level for personal authentication, yet the implementation of a multimodal biometric system for practical usage need to meet such criteria that multimodal biometric signals should be easy to acquire but not easily compromised. We [...] Read more.
Multimodal biometrics are promising for providing a strong security level for personal authentication, yet the implementation of a multimodal biometric system for practical usage need to meet such criteria that multimodal biometric signals should be easy to acquire but not easily compromised. We developed a wearable wrist band integrated with multispectral skin photomatrix (MSP) and electrocardiogram (ECG) sensors to improve the issues of collectability, performance and circumvention of multimodal biometric authentication. The band was designed to ensure collectability by sensing both MSP and ECG easily and to achieve high authentication performance with low computation, efficient memory usage, and relatively fast response. Acquisition of MSP and ECG using contact-based sensors could also prevent remote access to personal data. Personal authentication with multimodal biometrics using the integrated wearable wrist band was evaluated in 150 subjects and resulted in 0.2% equal error rate ( EER ) and 100% detection probability at 1% FAR (false acceptance rate) ( PD . 1 ), which is comparable to other state-of-the-art multimodal biometrics. An additional investigation with a separate MSP sensor, which enhanced contact with the skin, along with ECG reached 0.1% EER and 100% PD . 1 , showing a great potential of our in-house wearable band for practical applications. The results of this study demonstrate that our newly developed wearable wrist band may provide a reliable and easy-to-use multimodal biometric solution for personal authentication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Biomedical Sensors 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
An Auto-Calibrating Knee Flexion-Extension Axis Estimator Using Principal Component Analysis with Inertial Sensors
Sensors 2018, 18(6), 1882; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18061882
Received: 27 April 2018 / Revised: 3 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 8 June 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1821 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Correction
Abstract
Inertial measurement units (IMUs) have been demonstrated to reliably measure human joint angles—an essential quantity in the study of biomechanics. However, most previous literature proposed IMU-based joint angle measurement systems that required manual alignment or prescribed calibration motions. This paper presents a simple, [...] Read more.
Inertial measurement units (IMUs) have been demonstrated to reliably measure human joint angles—an essential quantity in the study of biomechanics. However, most previous literature proposed IMU-based joint angle measurement systems that required manual alignment or prescribed calibration motions. This paper presents a simple, physically-intuitive method for IMU-based measurement of the knee flexion/extension angle in gait without requiring alignment or discrete calibration, based on computationally-efficient and easy-to-implement Principle Component Analysis (PCA). The method is compared against an optical motion capture knee flexion/extension angle modeled through OpenSim. The method is evaluated using both measured and simulated IMU data in an observational study (n = 15) with an absolute root-mean-square-error (RMSE) of 9.24 and a zero-mean RMSE of 3.49. Variation in error across subjects was found, made emergent by the larger subject population than previous literature considers. Finally, the paper presents an explanatory model of RMSE on IMU mounting location. The observational data suggest that RMSE of the method is a function of thigh IMU perturbation and axis estimation quality. However, the effect size for these parameters is small in comparison to potential gains from improved IMU orientation estimations. Results also highlight the need to set relevant datums from which to interpret joint angles for both truth references and estimated data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Biomedical Sensors 2019)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Wearable Potentiometric Sensors for Medical Applications
Sensors 2019, 19(2), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19020363
Received: 3 December 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 17 January 2019
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Abstract
Wearable potentiometric sensors have received considerable attention owing to their great potential in a wide range of physiological and clinical applications, particularly involving ion detection in sweat. Despite the significant progress in the manner that potentiometric sensors are integrated in wearable devices, in [...] Read more.
Wearable potentiometric sensors have received considerable attention owing to their great potential in a wide range of physiological and clinical applications, particularly involving ion detection in sweat. Despite the significant progress in the manner that potentiometric sensors are integrated in wearable devices, in terms of materials and fabrication approaches, there is yet plenty of room for improvement in the strategy adopted for the sample collection. Essentially, this involves a fluidic sampling cell for continuous sweat analysis during sport performance or sweat accumulation via iontophoresis induction for one-spot measurements in medical settings. Even though the majority of the reported papers from the last five years describe on-body tests of wearable potentiometric sensors while the individual is practicing a physical activity, the medical utilization of these devices has been demonstrated on very few occasions and only in the context of cystic fibrosis diagnosis. In this sense, it may be important to explore the implementation of wearable potentiometric sensors into the analysis of other biofluids, such as saliva, tears and urine, as herein discussed. While the fabrication and uses of wearable potentiometric sensors vary widely, there are many common issues related to the analytical characterization of such devices that must be consciously addressed, especially in terms of sensor calibration and the validation of on-body measurements. After the assessment of key wearable potentiometric sensors reported over the last five years, with particular attention paid to those for medical applications, the present review offers tentative guidance regarding the characterization of analytical performance as well as analytical and clinical validations, thereby aiming at generating debate in the scientific community to allow for the establishment of well-conceived protocols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Biomedical Sensors 2019)
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Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessCorrection
Correction: McGrath, T., et al. An Auto-Calibrating Knee Flexion-Extension Axis Estimator using Principal Component Analysis with Inertial Sensors. Sensors 2018, 18(6), 1882
Sensors 2019, 19(7), 1504; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19071504
Received: 11 February 2019 / Accepted: 19 February 2019 / Published: 28 March 2019
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Abstract
The authors wish to make the following revisions to this paper [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Biomedical Sensors 2019)
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