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Special Issue "Remote Sensing Satellites Data Analysis for Land Use / Land Cover (LULC) and Vegetation Monitoring"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2022 | Viewed by 638

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Martin Kappas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Cartography, GIS and Remote Sensing, Faculty of Geoscience and Geography, Georg-August University Goettingen, 37077 Goettingen, Germany
Interests: land use/cover change; integrated watershed analysis; desertification in drylands; multi-sensor remote sensing; monitoring concepts; land surface and vegetation dynamics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Birgitta Putzenlechner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Cartography, GIS and Remote Sensing, Faculty of Geoscience and Geography, Georg-August University Goettingen, 37077 Goettingen, Germany
Interests: remote sensing; FAPAR; FCOVER; forests; environmental monitoring; UAV; geography; land use and land cover; Sentinel-2; essential climate variables
Dr. Daniel Wyss
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Cartography, GIS and Remote Sensing, Faculty of Geoscience and Geography, Georg-August University Goettingen, 37077 Goettingen, Germany
Interests: GIS project management; environmental analysis, monitoring, modeling und management; GIS capacity development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human-induced land use and land cover (LULC) changes have significantly reshaped Earth's terrestrial surface; such alterations comprise physical and biological entities including vegetative cover, water bodies, bare lands and artificial structures as a result of urbanization. Alternatively, land use refers to an intricate combination of socio-economic factors, management principles and economic purposes. We often designate land use and land cover together, but there is a distinct difference between the two.

The role of remote sensing in land use and land cover modeling has gained momentum over the last 50 years (Landsat passed its 50-year anniversary ). The important task for researchers now in the LULC domain is to continue identifying high-impact LCLUC "hotspot" areas around the globe where human-induced LCLUC is occurring on various scalesand to undertake research on land-use adaptation to climate change, integrating the socio-economic component. New sensors, such as those on the Sentinel or the newly launched Landsat 9, and multi-sensor approaches provide insight into changes in land use and land cover. Very high resolution (VHR) data are becoming more easily available at no cost. The commercial data currently distributed by NASA are available under different scientific use licenses and various access portals (e.g. The Commercial Smallsat Data Acquisition (CSDA) program). Currently, data acquired by Planet, Maxar (formerly DigitalGlobe, Inc.) and Spire Global are available. Data from Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc.’s DLR Earth Sensing Imaging Spectrometer (DESIS) are also accesible. Global data for tropical regions were made freely available by the Norwegian government (e.g. https://www.planet.com/nicfi/). The future hyperspectral EnMAP sensor will also enable new achievements in the exploration of landscapes and the quality of land cover. LCLUC studies focusing on the synergy of various kinds of satellite observations, together with novel methods such as “big data” and “machine learning”, as well as advanced methods to incorporate socio-economic data (e.g. role of remote sensing for land use and land cover change modeling, e.g. Dyna-CLUE), are welcome for this special issue.

Prof. Dr. Martin Kappas
Dr. Birgitta Putzenlechner
Dr. Daniel Wyss

Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Assessment of Climate Change and Human Activities on Vegetation Development in Northeast China
Sensors 2022, 22(7), 2509; https://doi.org/10.3390/s22072509 - 25 Mar 2022
Viewed by 465
Abstract
Vegetation in Northeast China (NEC) has faced dual challenges posed by climate change and human activities. However, the factors dominating vegetation development and their contribution remain unclear. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the response of vegetation in different land [...] Read more.
Vegetation in Northeast China (NEC) has faced dual challenges posed by climate change and human activities. However, the factors dominating vegetation development and their contribution remain unclear. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the response of vegetation in different land cover types, climate regions, and time scales to water availability from 1990 to 2018 based on the relationship between normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI). The effects of human activities and climate change on vegetation development were quantitatively evaluated using the residual analysis method. We found that the area percentage with positive correlation between NDVI and SPEI increased with time scales. NDVI of grass, sparse vegetation, rain-fed crop, and built-up land as well as sub-humid and semi-arid areas (drylands) correlated positively with SPEI, and the correlations increased with time scales. The negatively correlated area was concentrated in humid areas or areas covered by forests and shrubs. Vegetation water surplus in humid areas weakens with warming, and vegetation water constraints in drylands enhance. Moreover, potential evapotranspiration had an overall negative effect on vegetation, and precipitation was a controlling factor for vegetation development in semi-arid areas. A total of 53% of the total area in NEC showed a trend of improvement, which is mainly attributed to human activities (93%), especially through the implementation of ecological restoration projects in NEC. The relative role of human activities and climate change in vegetation degradation areas were 56% and 44%, respectively. Our findings highlight that the government should more explicitly consider the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of the influence of human activities and water availability on vegetation under changing climate and improve the resilience of regional water resources. The relative proportions and roles map of climate change and human activities in vegetation change areas provide a basis for government to formulate local-based management policies. Full article
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