sensors-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Fabrication and Machining Technologies for Sensors

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (19 February 2021) | Viewed by 9424

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Research Council Canada, London, ON, Canada
Interests: precision laser micromachining of materials; ultrashort pulse; diode-pumped and solid-state lasers and their applications to micro-devices and products; laser micro-processing of materials; photonic band gap materials; porous semiconductors; machine and process dynamics; micro-device/sensor fabrication and laser joining of materials.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit your technological contributions and manuscripts to this Special Issue, titled “Fabrication and Machining Technologies for Sensors”.

The progress in micro/nano technologies and their applications in the development of sensors is breathtaking in various manufacturing sectors. In particular, the continuous progress in machining of diverse materials, availability of newer fabrication technology tools, and diversity in the design and engineering, data acquisition, packaging, and control systems enable advancements in the state-of-the-art knowledge and sensor technologies.

This Special Issue aims to focus on the emerging advances in novel machining techniques, processes, and fabrication technologies for the development of sensors along with relevant electronics, packaging, and control systems. In addition, applications of sensors for evolving manufacturing fields are also welcome.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • sensor development processes, fabrication, and design architecture;
  • laser-based fabrication technologies, joining of materials, microwelding, microforming, and textured/structured and engineered surfaces;
  • machining of materials: microfabrication, laser micromachining, micromilling, diamond cutting, nanomachining, 3D printing, laser trimming, laser ablation;
  • new techniques and technologies for sensors for/in optics and photonics;
  • fabrication requirements for sensors for biomedical devices;
  • applications of ultrafast lasers for material processing and sensor packaging technologies;
  • sensing techniques and measurements and data acquisition and processing;
  • Manufacturing methods and tools: optical, electro-chemical, thin films, electronic;
  • thin and thick film machining, diamond-like hard materials and coatings for sensor fabrication;
  • multi-functional sensors, sensorial surfaces, connectivity;
  • low-cost sensor developments: material considerations, productivity, fabrication.

Dr. Suwas Nikumb
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • micromachining
  • laser materials processing
  • thin films
  • laser ablation
  • machining of materials
  • sensor fabrication
  • joining of materials
  • microdevices
  • ultrafast laser applications to sensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

9 pages, 2408 KiB  
Communication
Eddy Current Sensor System for Tilting Independent In-Process Measurement of Magnetic Anisotropy
by Frank Wendler, Rohan Munjal, Muhammad Waqas, Robert Laue, Sebastian Härtel, Birgit Awiszus and Olfa Kanoun
Sensors 2021, 21(8), 2652; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21082652 - 09 Apr 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3031
Abstract
Modern production equipment is based on the results of quality control as well as process parameters. The magnetic anisotropy of materials is closely connected to internal mechanical stress by the Villari effect, and also to hardening effects due to plastic deformations, and could [...] Read more.
Modern production equipment is based on the results of quality control as well as process parameters. The magnetic anisotropy of materials is closely connected to internal mechanical stress by the Villari effect, and also to hardening effects due to plastic deformations, and could therefore provide an interesting basis for process control. Nevertheless, the analysis of anisotropic properties is extremely sensitive to sensor and workpiece misalignments, such as tilting. In this work, a novel eddy current sensor system is introduced, performing a non-contact measurement of the magnetic anisotropy of a workpiece and realizing a separation and correction of tilting effects. The measurement principle is demonstrated with the example of two samples with different magnetic anisotropy values induced by cold forming. Both samples are analyzed under different tilt angles between the sensor axis and the surface of the workpiece. In this work, digital signal processing is demonstrated on the acquired raw data in order to differentiate the effects of tilt and of anisotropy, with the use of preliminary results as an example of two prepared samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fabrication and Machining Technologies for Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 4001 KiB  
Article
Laser-Facilitated Additive Manufacturing Enables Fabrication of Biocompatible Neural Devices
by Ailke Behrens, Jan Stieghorst, Theodor Doll and Ulrich P. Froriep
Sensors 2020, 20(22), 6614; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20226614 - 19 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2415
Abstract
Current personalized treatment of neurological diseases is limited by availability of appropriate manufacturing methods suitable for long term sensors for neural electrical activities in the brain. An additive manufacturing process for polymer-based biocompatible neural sensors for chronic application towards individualized implants is here [...] Read more.
Current personalized treatment of neurological diseases is limited by availability of appropriate manufacturing methods suitable for long term sensors for neural electrical activities in the brain. An additive manufacturing process for polymer-based biocompatible neural sensors for chronic application towards individualized implants is here presented. To process thermal crosslinking polymers, the developed extrusion process enables, in combination with an infrared (IR)-Laser, accelerated curing directly after passing the outlet of the nozzle. As a result, no additional curing steps are necessary during the build-up. Furthermore, the minimal structure size can be achieved using the laser and, in combination with the extrusion parameters, provide structural resolutions desired. Active implant components fabricated using biocompatible materials for both conductive pathways and insulating cladding keep their biocompatible properties even after the additive manufacturing process. In addition, first characterization of the electric properties in terms of impedance towards application in neural tissues are shown. The printing toolkit developed enables processing of low-viscous, flexible polymeric thermal curing materials for fabrication of individualized neural implants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fabrication and Machining Technologies for Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 5512 KiB  
Article
An Affordable Fabrication of a Zeolite-Based Capacitor for Gas Sensing
by Salvatore Andrea Pullano, Francesco Falcone, Davide C. Critello, Maria Giovanna Bianco, Michele Menniti and Antonino S. Fiorillo
Sensors 2020, 20(7), 2143; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20072143 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3156
Abstract
The development of even more compact, inexpensive, and highly sensitive gas sensors is widespread, even though their performances are still limited and technological improvements are in continuous evolution. Zeolite is a class of material which has received particular attention in different applications due [...] Read more.
The development of even more compact, inexpensive, and highly sensitive gas sensors is widespread, even though their performances are still limited and technological improvements are in continuous evolution. Zeolite is a class of material which has received particular attention in different applications due to its interesting adsorption/desorption capabilities. The behavior of a zeolite 4A modified capacitor has been investigated for the adsorption of nitrogen (N2), nitric oxide (NO) and 1,1-Difluoroethane (C2H4F2), which are of interest in the field of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats. Sample measurements were carried out in different environmental conditions, and the variation of the sensor electric capacitance was investigated. The dielectric properties were influenced by the type and concentration of gas species in the environment. Higher changes in capacitance were shown during the adsorption of dry air (+4.2%) and fluorinated gas (+7.3%), while lower dielectric variations were found upon exposure to N2 (−0.4%) and NO (−0.5%). The proposed approach pointed-out that a simple fabrication process may provide a convenient and affordable fabrication of reusable capacitive gas sensor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fabrication and Machining Technologies for Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop