Health Threats of Climate Change

Editors


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Department of Emergency, Saiseikai Kumamoto Hospital, Kumamoto 861-4193, Japan
Interests: emergency medicine and Intensive care; disaster medicine; trauma; anesthesiology especially airway management; sepsis; resuscitation

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kurashiki Central Hospital, Kurashiki 710-8602, Japan
Interests: orthopaedic surgery; osteoarthritis; rheumatoid arthritis; bone and cartilage
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0129, Japan
Interests: wound healing; evolution of human skin; tropical skin diseases; sarcoidosis; angiosarcoma

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Division of Physics, Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Center for Medical Education, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556, Hokkaido, Japan
Interests: epidemiology; geophysics; nonlinear science; time series analysis

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1. Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
2. Cardiovascular Respiratory Sleep Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
3. Sleep and Sleep-Disordered Breathing Center, Juntendo University Hospital, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
Interests: autonomic nervous system; cheyne-stokes respiration; fluid retention; heart failure; hemodynamics; percutaneous coronary intervention; positive airway pressure; sleep; sleep apnea

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Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan
Interests: epigenetics; DNA demethylation; ubiquitin ligase; gynecologic oncology
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School of Health Science and Social Welfare, Okayama, Japan
Interests: psychiatry; neuroscience

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleague,

The gravest threat to life on Earth is currently occurring due to climate change.

The planet’s global warming changes habitat environments beyond the range of many organisms. It also causes drought, reduces food sources, and kills species by causing heatstroke. If these situations do not change, more than a third of the Earth’s animal and plant species face extinction by 2050. This indicates that the current situation is the prelude to further disasters. Therefore, we need to be aware of the effects of such disasters on living organisms. Here, we plan to study unique features of diseases associated with climate changes such as high temperatures, wildfires, typhoons, floods, landslides, droughts, and so on. Humans will suffer from many climate-change-induced diseases such as heat stroke, cardiovascular diseases, trauma, skin diseases, obstetric complications, hunger, and mental health issues. In wildlife, various infectious diseases occur through animals, water, air, and humans. We will also learn how measuring DAMP and Alarmin can provide a better picture for detecting the severe impact on human beings who suffer. Such efforts will prevent human living environments from reaching the bleaching conditions seen in corals.

Prof. Dr. Toshio Hattori
Dr. Yujiro Nakayama
Dr. Hiromu Ito
Prof. Dr. Kenzo Takahashi
Prof. Dr. Ayako Sumi
Dr. Takatoshi Kasai
Dr. Ichiro Onoyama
Prof. Dr. Shigeru Morinobu
Collection Editors

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Published Papers (3 papers)

2024

Jump to: 2023

5 pages, 2050 KiB  
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Febrile Rash: An Early Diagnostic Clue to Infectious Illness in Travelers Returning from Thailand
by Hisham Ahmed Imad, Anastasia Putri, Ratchata Charoenwisedsil, Sakarn Charoensakulchai and Eric Caumes
Reports 2024, 7(2), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports7020045 - 7 Jun 2024
Viewed by 784
Abstract
The eruption of a rash along with spiking fever in travelers returning from the tropics may be suspicious of arboviral diseases, and isolation prevent further transmission in non-endemic countries. The case presented here was seen at the Fever Clinic at the Hospital for [...] Read more.
The eruption of a rash along with spiking fever in travelers returning from the tropics may be suspicious of arboviral diseases, and isolation prevent further transmission in non-endemic countries. The case presented here was seen at the Fever Clinic at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Bangkok, Thailand. The presenting complaints were fever, headache, myalgia, and a distinctive erythematous blanching rash. Despite a negative dengue NS1 test on the initial day, anti-dengue IgM and IgG were detectable on day five of illness. Dengue, a leading cause of traveler’s fever with rash, is of particular concern, especially during outbreaks like the one in Thailand in 2023, when the number of cases exceeded one hundred thousand over a nine-month period. The influx of 28 million travelers in 2023, many with naive immunity to many arboviruses, raises fear of transmission to temperate regions, including to countries like France, where Aedes albopictus establishment can lead to autochthonous dengue cases and clusters. Enhanced surveillance is crucial, urging the consideration of dengue as a potential diagnosis in travelers with febrile rash, even prior to lab confirmation. Immediate isolation of patients is essential to prevent autochthonous transmission, reduce outbreak risks, and avert public health crises. Full article
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8 pages, 204 KiB  
Case Report
West Nile Virus Meningoencephalitis—A Consideration for Earlier Investigation
by David Burns, Zachary Vinton, Min Kyung Chung and Johnny Cheng
Reports 2024, 7(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports7020023 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1080
Abstract
West Nile Virus (WNV) is an arbovirus endemic to many countries and has caused over 56,000 cases, with 2776 deaths in the U.S. from 1999 to 2022. WNV occurs most often in the fall, typically affecting elderly populations in states like Nebraska and [...] Read more.
West Nile Virus (WNV) is an arbovirus endemic to many countries and has caused over 56,000 cases, with 2776 deaths in the U.S. from 1999 to 2022. WNV occurs most often in the fall, typically affecting elderly populations in states like Nebraska and Arizona. Currently, supportive care is the only management for WNV. Our case is a female patient in her mid-70s in an intermountain state who presented in the fall with WNV meningoencephalitis and experienced a delay in care due to the unique clinical presentation. This demonstrates the importance of early inclusion of WNV in the differential for altered mental status, especially with WNV risk factors, and expedition of supportive care. Doing so could potentially reduce antibiotic duration and hospital costs. Full article

2023

Jump to: 2024

8 pages, 663 KiB  
Case Report
Prophylaxis Failure and Successful Management of Delayed-Onset Malaria with Renal Complications: A Case Report with Oral Artemether-Lumefantrine Treatment
by Ilir Tolaj, Gramoz Bunjaku, Murat Mehmeti and Yllka Begolli
Reports 2023, 6(4), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports6040053 - 8 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1569
Abstract
This case report presents a critical clinical scenario involving a 55-year-old patient who developed severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria with renal complications despite receiving doxycycline prophylaxis while traveling in a malaria-endemic region. The case emphasizes the potential failure of doxycycline prophylaxis and highlights the [...] Read more.
This case report presents a critical clinical scenario involving a 55-year-old patient who developed severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria with renal complications despite receiving doxycycline prophylaxis while traveling in a malaria-endemic region. The case emphasizes the potential failure of doxycycline prophylaxis and highlights the importance of considering malaria in patients with a history of travel to endemic areas, even if they have adhered to prophylactic treatment. The patient’s clinical presentation included fever, extreme fatigue, and loss of consciousness, leading to hospitalization. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia, elevated liver enzymes, and impaired renal function, consistent with the criteria for severe malaria. The diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of Plasmodium falciparum parasites on thin blood smears. Due to limited access to parenteral antimalarial medications in Kosovo, the patient received oral artemether-lumefantrine, resulting in clinical improvement. Supportive care and dialysis played a vital role in the patient’s recovery. This case report underscores the need for increased awareness of prophylaxis failure, the challenges of managing severe malaria in non-endemic countries, and the importance of timely and appropriate interventions to improve outcomes in severe malaria cases, particularly those with renal involvement. Full article
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