Acute and Persistent Viral Infection Diseases

A special issue of Reports (ISSN 2571-841X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 999

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

An acute virus infection typically refers to a sudden onset of symptoms caused by a viral agent. These symptoms can vary widely depending on the specific virus but often include fever, fatigue, muscle aches, respiratory issues, gastrointestinal problems, skin rashes, and general malaise based on inflammation.

In contrast, a persistent virus infection is characterized by the virus establishing a foothold in the body and continuing to replicate and cause symptoms over an extended period. These symptoms of persistent virus infection can vary depending on the virus involved and the individual’s immune response but may induce recurrent illness.

Examples of viruses that cause acute or persistent infections include SARS-CoV-2, influenza virus, hepatitis virus, human papillomavirus, herpes simplex virus, EB virus, and HIV. Various viruses other than those shown here are pathogenic. This Special Issue focuses on acute and persistent virus infections and explores their symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.

Prof. Dr. Toshio Hattori
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • RNA virus
  • DNA virus
  • inflammation
  • complications
  • COVID-19

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

9 pages, 408 KiB  
Article
Drug–Drug Interactions of Hydroxychloroquine and Chloroquine in Older Patients with COVID-19 during the First Pandemic Waves: The GeroCovid Observational Study
by Caterina Trevisan, Andrea Cignarella, Andrea Grandieri, Giuseppe Sergi, Stefano Fumagalli, Fabio Monzani, Chukwuma Okoye, Giuseppe Bellelli, Alba Malara, Pietro Gareri, Stefano Volpato, Raffaele Antonelli Incalzi and The GeroCovid Acute Ward Working Group
Reports 2024, 7(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports7020042 - 23 May 2024
Viewed by 567
Abstract
Objective: Chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) were used as off-label treatments for SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first pandemic waves. The urgency of combatting COVID-19 led to the dissemination of medical recommendations with a scarce awareness of possible drug–drug interactions. This issue primarily concerned [...] Read more.
Objective: Chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) were used as off-label treatments for SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first pandemic waves. The urgency of combatting COVID-19 led to the dissemination of medical recommendations with a scarce awareness of possible drug–drug interactions. This issue primarily concerned people already taking multiple medications, such as older individuals. We estimated the prevalence of drug interactions with CQ or HCQ in COVID-19 inpatients during the first pandemic waves and their possible association with hospitalization-related outcomes. Methods: This study considers 487 patients aged ≥60, hospitalized for COVID-19 from March to December 2020, and treated with CQ or HCQ. Data on acute and chronic therapies and hospitalization length and outcomes were derived from medical records. The presence of drugs potentially interacting with CQ and HCQ was identified based on published literature and drug databases. Results: In our sample (mean age 77.1 years, 47.8% females), 255 (52.4%) patients presented with one drug interaction with CQ or HCQ, and 114 (23.4%) had more than two interactions. The most frequent drugs potentially interacting with CQ or HCQ were lopinavir/ritonavir (50.4%), azithromycin (47.2%), tocilizumab (15.4%), levofloxacin (8.7%), clarithromycin (6.0%), amlodipine (3.3%), and trazodone (2.4%). No substantial differences in the duration and outcomes of the hospitalization emerged as a function of the presence of drug–drug interactions. Conclusions: Many older patients prescribed with CQ or HCQ, which have lately proved ineffective against COVID-19, were exposed to the risk of drug–drug interaction. This underlines that medical recommendations should undergo careful peer review before being widely disseminated, even in emergencies like a pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acute and Persistent Viral Infection Diseases)
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