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Special Issue "Remote Sensing of Urban Ecology and Sustainability"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Elizabeth Wentz

School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85281, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: shape and pattern analysis; geographic information science; applications of GIS to urban environment; urban remote sensing; water resource management
Guest Editor
Dr. Qunshan Zhao

School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85281, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: geographic information science; urban remote sensing; location modeling and analysis; spatial statistics; urban climate modeling and instrumentation; urban green infrastructure; human and environmental systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The increase in the number of people living in urban areas, the proliferation of megacities, and the pervasive expansion of per-urban areas are some of the most challenging transformations of the 21st century. Urbanization has profoundly influenced urban ecosystem structures and functions, greatly changed the landscape within and around cities worldwide, and significantly influenced the living environment of urban residents. While great economic benefits are achieved by the urbanization process, negative ecological consequences such as urban heat island effects, biological invasion, air and water pollutions, and biodiversity loss and degradation are happening in the urban environment simultaneously. Thus, it is crucial to better understand how to create a sustainable urban environment, balance the conflicts between urbanization and human activities, and alleviate the negative impacts from urbanization process.

Remote Sensing offers an efficient method with which to monitor and observe the urban ecosystem and sustainable environment in a real-time and high-spatial-resolution manner. After more than 50 years of development, various remote sensing techniques (optical, thermal infrared, microwave (SAR/INSAR), light detection and ranging (LIDAR), and night lights) have been widely applied to understand the urban environment. We are requesting papers for a Special Issue of Remote Sensing on the remote sensing of urban ecology and sustainability. Specific topics include, but are not limited to

  • The use of remote sensing to understand the ecological consequences of urbanization, such as biological invasion, habitat fragmentation, etc.
  • The use of remote sensing to develop urban green infrastructure
  • The exploration of urban heat island effects and ecosystem services using remote sensing
  • Novel remote sensing application (new sensors, new methodology, etc.) in urban ecology and sustainability

We especially encourage submission with a combination of different methodologies (remote sensing, spatial analysis, urban climatology, etc.) to understand the overarching topic.

Prof. Elizabeth Wentz
Dr. Qunshan Zhao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban remote sensing
  • urban ecology
  • sustainable urban environment
  • urban green infrastructure
  • urban climate
  • spatial analysis and modeling
  • GIS

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Geospatial Analysis of Horizontal and Vertical Urban Expansion Using Multi-Spatial Resolution Data: A Case Study of Surabaya, Indonesia
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(10), 1599; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10101599
Received: 21 August 2018 / Revised: 18 September 2018 / Accepted: 2 October 2018 / Published: 9 October 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (15646 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Urbanization addresses urban expansion, and it leads conversion of the green space into the built-up area. However, previous studies mainly focused on two-dimensional (2D) urban expansion rather than three-dimensional (3D) growth. Here, the purpose of this study is to examine the urban expansion, [...] Read more.
Urbanization addresses urban expansion, and it leads conversion of the green space into the built-up area. However, previous studies mainly focused on two-dimensional (2D) urban expansion rather than three-dimensional (3D) growth. Here, the purpose of this study is to examine the urban expansion, including built-up and green space for both horizontal and vertical dimensions using geospatial analysis including remote sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) in the sub-Central Business District (CBD) area of Surabaya, Indonesia. The medium resolution remote sensing data for both image and Digital Surface Model (DSM) acquired by Advanced Land-Observing Satellite (ALOS) were applied for time-1 (2010). The orthophoto and DSM derived by LiDAR were used for time-2 (2016). We quantified the built-up and green expansions in 2D (area), which were extracted from land use/land cover (LU/LC) by applying hybrid classification. The built-up and green expansions in 3D (volume) were estimated by generating a surface feature model. The spatial configuration of area expansion was investigated using patch metric, while the volume growth was examined using the volume expansion rate. We got three findings. (1) The built-up and green area had expanded about 11.54% and 95.61%, respectively, from 2010 to 2016. The expansion of green area presented in a notable portion, which was mainly contributed by the conversion of bareland to playground or park. However, the expansion of built-up area was less than the volume expansion of 20.6%. It revealed that built-up growth led to vertical rather than horizontal development. (2) The built-up area expansion tended to scatter configuration, whereas, the green area expansion tended to aggregate in a linear pattern. (3) The ratio of built-up volume expansion to green volume expansion showed a mean of 3.7, indicating that the development of built-up and green volume was imbalanced. The built-up growth presented higher than the green growth, mainly in the areas with more vertical building establishment. The pressing need for higher green volume in the study area was identified in several sites located at surrounding artery and toll roads. Overall, our approach can be applied as a reference in monitoring neighborhood environment through greening programs for sustainable urban development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Urban Ecology and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Assessing Impacts of Urban Form on Landscape Structure of Urban Green Spaces in China Using Landsat Images Based on Google Earth Engine
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(10), 1569; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10101569
Received: 11 August 2018 / Revised: 25 September 2018 / Accepted: 28 September 2018 / Published: 1 October 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4517 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The structure of urban green spaces (UGS) plays an important role in determining the ecosystem services that they support. Knowledge of factors shaping landscape structure of UGS is imperative for planning and management of UGS. In this study, we assessed the influence of [...] Read more.
The structure of urban green spaces (UGS) plays an important role in determining the ecosystem services that they support. Knowledge of factors shaping landscape structure of UGS is imperative for planning and management of UGS. In this study, we assessed the influence of urban form on the structure of UGS in 262 cities in China based on remote sensing data. We produced land cover maps for 262 cities in 2015 using 6673 scenes of Landsat ETM+/OLI images based on the Google Earth Engine platform. We analyzed the impact of urban form on landscape structure of UGS in these cities using boosted regression tree analysis with the landscape and urban form metrics derived from the land cover maps as response and prediction variables, respectively. The results showed that the three urban form metrics—perimeter area ratio, road density, and compound terrain complexity index—were all significantly correlated with selected landscape metrics of UGS. Cities with high road density had less UGS area and the UGS in those cities was more fragmented. Cities with complex built-up boundaries tended to have more fragmented UGS. Cities with high terrain complexity had more UGS but the UGS were more fragmented. Our results for the first time revealed the importance of urban form on shaping landscape structure of UGS in 262 cities at a national scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Urban Ecology and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Linking Heat Source–Sink Landscape Patterns with Analysis of Urban Heat Islands: Study on the Fast-Growing Zhengzhou City in Central China
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(8), 1268; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10081268
Received: 5 July 2018 / Revised: 8 August 2018 / Accepted: 9 August 2018 / Published: 11 August 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (21943 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Globally, the urban heat island (UHI) effect is a major problem which leads to urban residents suffering from adverse urban ecological environments and serious health risks. Understanding the impacts of urban landscape features on the thermal environment has been an important focus across [...] Read more.
Globally, the urban heat island (UHI) effect is a major problem which leads to urban residents suffering from adverse urban ecological environments and serious health risks. Understanding the impacts of urban landscape features on the thermal environment has been an important focus across various fields of research. The purpose of this study is to analyze the impacts of urban heat source–sink landscape patterns on urban heat islands, using the fast-growing Zhengzhou City in central China as the case study. Landsat data (captured in 1996, 2006, and 2014), various geospatial approaches, and correlation analysis were applied to facilitate the analysis. Based on the contributions of the urban landscape to land surface temperature (LST), we empirically identified the heat sources and heat sinks. Then, the composition and configurations of heat source and sink landscapes were estimated by a series of spatial metrics at the landscape and class levels. The results showed that the overall mean land surface temperature (LST) in the study area increased by 2.72 °C from 1996 to 2014. This observed increasing trend in overall mean LST is consistent with the process of rapid urbanization in the study area, which was evidenced by the dramatic increase in impervious surfaces and the substantial loss in vegetation cover. Generally, as observed, landscape composition has a stronger influence on LST than does landscape configuration. For heat sources, the proportion, size, aggregation, and density of patches have positive effects on LST, while adjusting the spatial distribution and abundance of urban landscape are effective ways to control the UHI effects. In contrast, the percentage, size, density, and aggregation of heat sink patches have negative effects on LST. Additionally, the effects of increasing total patch edges and shape complexity should be considered when mitigating the UHI effect. These findings are beneficial for furthering our understanding of how urban landscape patterns affect UHI, and they can help optimize urban landscape patterns to alleviate the UHI effect and enhance sustainable development in the study area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Urban Ecology and Sustainability)
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Remote Sens. EISSN 2072-4292 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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