Special Issue "Seeing and Reading: Art and Literature in Pre-Modern Indian Religions"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Phyllis Granoff
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Religious Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
Interests: classical religions of India–Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism; Indian art and literature
Dr. Sonya Rhie Mace
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cleveland Museum of Art, 11150 East Blvd, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
Interests: Indian and Southeast Asian Art and culture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This issue brings together articles about the interplay between the visual arts and literature in pre-modern Indian religions. They explore the novel ways in which sculpture, painting, architecture, even textiles, made use of literary sources or themselves figured in literary works. For example, illustrations on manuscripts had a complex relationship to the written words, sometimes ignoring them, but at other times depicting even their most subtle word-plays;  cults of miraculous images drew on widely known stories like the Mahābhārata and further depended on written and oral sources to spread  accounts of the miracles; temples, like cities, were the focus of elaborate descriptions in poetry and drama, while techniques of dyeing cloth became metaphors for the firmness of religious commitment and knowledge. For scholars today unusual features in sculpture or painting can help illuminate the history of textual accounts and shed light on the transmission of religious ideas across cultures. The essays together provide a template for deepening our understanding of art and religion in India by reading and seeing in consort.

Dr. Phyllis Granoff
Dr. Sonya Rhie Mace
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Buddhism
  • Jainism
  • Hinduism
  • painting
  • sculpture
  • literature

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Coloring the World: Some Thoughts from Jain and Buddhist Narratives
Religions 2020, 11(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11010009 - 23 Dec 2019
Abstract
This paper begins with an examination of early Indian speculation about colors, their number, their use, and their significance. It ranges widely from the Upaniṣads to the Nāṭyaśāstra, from Śvetāmbara Jain canonical texts to Buddhaghosa’s treatise on meditation, the Visuddhimagga, from [...] Read more.
This paper begins with an examination of early Indian speculation about colors, their number, their use, and their significance. It ranges widely from the Upaniṣads to the Nāṭyaśāstra, from Śvetāmbara Jain canonical texts to Buddhaghosa’s treatise on meditation, the Visuddhimagga, from purāṇas to technical treatises on painting. It turns then to examine how select Jain and Buddhist texts used color in two important scenarios, descriptions of the setting for events and the person of the Jina/Buddha. In the concluding reflections, I compare textual practices with a few examples from the visual record to ask what role if any the colors specified in a story might have played in the choices made by an artist. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seeing and Reading: Art and Literature in Pre-Modern Indian Religions)
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