Special Issue "Publishing Research Internationally: Multilingual Perspectives from Research and Practice"

A special issue of Publications (ISSN 2304-6775).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (21 December 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Margaret Cargill

School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61 439 954 814
Interests: pedagogy of research communication; interdisciplinary collaboration; English as an additional language in research communication; applied linguistics
Guest Editor
Dr. Sally Burgess

Departamento de Filología inglesa y alemana, Universidad de La Laguna, Tenerife, 38071 Spain
E-Mail
Phone: +34 610 859 412
Interests: teaching and learning academic writing and presentation skills; research evaluation policies and their impact on publishing practices; languages of research publication; literary translation; applied linguistics
Guest Editor
Dr. Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir

Faculty of Languages and Cultures, School of Humanities, University of Iceland, 101, Reykjavik, Iceland
E-Mail
Phone: +354-5254558
Interests: English as a medium of instruction; English for research publication purposes; language contact; heritage languges

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We warmly invite your submissions to this Special Issue of Publications, which will showcase selected contributions to the fourth PRISEAL Conference—Publishing and Presenting Research Internationally: Issues for Speakers of English as an Additional Language, plus additional papers that contribute substantially to the conference themes.

The 2018 conference will be hosted by the Vigdís Finnbogadóttir Institute for Languages, a UNESCO Centre, at the University of Iceland, from 14–16 September 2018. There we will build on the discussions and debates begun in Tenerife (2007), Katowice (2011) and Coimbra (2015). The issues and challenges have intensified for researchers of all disciplines who use English as an additional language, and research and practice have moved to address them in interesting ways.

Our 2018 theme—Research and Practice: Moving Forward—is designed to encourage contributions from the widest possible range of scholars and practitioners involved in EAL/ERPP today.

Aiming at a better understanding of how research supports practice of users of English as an additional language, we invite submissions from journal publishers, editors and reviewers; authors and translators; teachers, materials writers and course designers for English for research publication Purposes; and scholars within humanities and social science fields including applied linguistics.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • academic publishing issues (e.g., advantages and limitations of open-access vs. commercial publishers; predatory journals and publishers)
  • the geopolitics of academic writing (e.g., dominance of English, epistemicide, English as a Lingua Franca)
  • academic ethics from a cross-cultural perspective (e.g., plagiarism and academic integrity)
  • the process of writing for publication
  • translation and editing in the academic context
  • assessing and teaching English for research and publication purposes
  • peer-review in intercultural and multilingual contexts

In terms of the genre, contributions can be think-pieces, theoretical discussions, research reports with empirical data, or reviews of relevant literature that lead to new insights for the field.

All submissions will undergo the regular peer review and editorial procedures followed by the journal. I look forward to your contributions and will be pleased to answer any questions you may have.

Dr. Margaret Cargill
Dr. Sally Burgess
Dr. Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Publications is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Academic Writing
  • Publication strategy
  • English as an additional language (EAL)
  • English for Research Publication Purposes (ERPP)
  • Language issues in publication processes and products

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial “Scientific Writing for Impact Is a Learned Skill—It Can Be Enhanced with Training”: An Interview with Patrick O’Connor
Publications 2019, 7(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7010017
Received: 18 February 2019 / Accepted: 27 February 2019 / Published: 5 March 2019
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Abstract
Dr Patrick O’Connor is a scientist based in Adelaide, Australia [...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle Multilingual Research Writing beyond English: The Case of Norwegian Academic Discourse in an Era of Multilingual Publication Practices
Publications 2019, 7(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7020025
Received: 1 December 2018 / Revised: 11 February 2019 / Accepted: 28 March 2019 / Published: 4 April 2019
PDF Full-text (487 KB)
Abstract
Although English is the dominant language of scholarly publication, many multilingual scholars continue to publish in other languages while they also publish in English. A large body of research documents how these multilingual scholars negotiate writing in English for publication. We know less, [...] Read more.
Although English is the dominant language of scholarly publication, many multilingual scholars continue to publish in other languages while they also publish in English. A large body of research documents how these multilingual scholars negotiate writing in English for publication. We know less, however, about the implications of such negotiations for other languages that scholars work in. We wanted to investigate trends in writing conventions in language other than English during a period when multilingual publication patterns have been common. Specifically, we examined changes in rhetorical patterns in the introduction sections of the 1994 and the 2014 volumes of three Norwegian-language journals in three different disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Our findings show that while certain features of our material might be interpreted as the result of a non-English discourse community adopting dominant Anglo-American models, the overall picture is more complex. Our study indicates that we need more research that examines cross-linguistic textual practices that focus on English and any other languages that scholars may work in. We also consider the possible pedagogical implications of such a focus. Full article
Open AccessArticle Korean Scholars’ Use of For-Pay Editors and Perceptions of Ethicality
Publications 2019, 7(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7010021
Received: 14 November 2018 / Revised: 6 February 2019 / Accepted: 8 March 2019 / Published: 14 March 2019
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Abstract
Many Korean scholars rely on language professionals for preparing English manuscripts. So far, little has been reported on how Korean scholars utilize them and how they perceive various types of help received. This study examines how Korean scholars utilize for-pay editors and translators, [...] Read more.
Many Korean scholars rely on language professionals for preparing English manuscripts. So far, little has been reported on how Korean scholars utilize them and how they perceive various types of help received. This study examines how Korean scholars utilize for-pay editors and translators, and how they perceive various types of textual modifications incurred in the process, based on the data obtained through a survey completed by 88 Korean faculty from three universities. Half of the participants received proofreading help from for-pay editors, and fewer participants received help with translation. They held widely differing views on ethicality concerning scenarios that involved global- and content-level editing; none of the help described was perceived as clearly unethical. This paper argues that as the academic communities benefit from the knowledge and insights created through research conducted by scholars across the world, it is necessary to establish proper boundaries of writing help. Full article
Open AccessArticle Shakespeare and the English Poets: The Influence of Native Speaking English Reviewers on the Acceptance of Journal Articles
Publications 2019, 7(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7010020
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 21 February 2019 / Accepted: 6 March 2019 / Published: 8 March 2019
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Abstract
The vast majority of highly ranked academic journals use English as the means of communication. That means that academics who wish to have their research internationally recognised need to publish in English. For those who are not native speakers of English (non-anglophone), this [...] Read more.
The vast majority of highly ranked academic journals use English as the means of communication. That means that academics who wish to have their research internationally recognised need to publish in English. For those who are not native speakers of English (non-anglophone), this requirement is challenging. Research indicates that these authors are at a distinct disadvantage, and that to a certain extent, this disadvantage may be exacerbated by the attitudes of reviewers. This study sought to investigate the attitudes of journal reviewers who are native speakers of English (anglophone). Eight academics who regularly review for international journals took part in semistructured interviews about their attitudes towards the kind of English they believe should be used in articles they would recommend for publication. It appears that there is a bias against language that differs from native speaker use, and that authors who employ nonstandard English might well be regarded negatively, regardless of the merits of their research. It is important, therefore, that the issue of what is regarded as appropriate English for international journals enjoys a great deal more careful consideration. Full article
Open AccessArticle The Institutional Context of ‘Linguistic Injustice’: Norwegian Social Scientists and Situated Multilingualism
Publications 2019, 7(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7010010
Received: 23 November 2018 / Revised: 22 January 2019 / Accepted: 28 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
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Abstract
The debate about ‘linguistic injustice’ centers on whether or not English as an additional language (EAL) writers face challenges in writing academically that are qualitatively different from those of novice academic writers irrespective of language background. This study aims to add nuance to [...] Read more.
The debate about ‘linguistic injustice’ centers on whether or not English as an additional language (EAL) writers face challenges in writing academically that are qualitatively different from those of novice academic writers irrespective of language background. This study aims to add nuance to this debate by looking at range of writers (from novice to expert) within an interdisciplinary social science research institute in Norway in order to investigate the mediating role of the institutional context. Using an ethnographic approach with an academic literacies perspective, it examines the challenges these writers face and discusses them in light of tensions between identity and institutional environment. It argues that the high degree of immersion in English causes ‘situated multilingualism’, where their ability to write about their topic in English surpasses their ability to write about it in Norwegian. Nonetheless, even the expert writers, particularly those in disciplines that value a unique authorial voice, demonstrated insecurity and lack of ownership to their writing in English. Moreover, the pressure to also sometimes write in Norwegian represented an additional site of negotiation not faced by their non-Norwegian counterparts. This suggests that the challenges EAL writers face are not determined by their language background alone, but also by their institutional environment—including the pressure to publish ‘internationally’, the amount of writing expected, and their immersion in English. Full article
Open AccessArticle Genre Pedagogy and Bilingual Graduate Students’ Academic Writing
Received: 28 November 2018 / Revised: 7 January 2019 / Accepted: 14 January 2019 / Published: 26 January 2019
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Abstract
Genre pedagogy plays an important role in helping graduate students to enter the discourse community of their fields. Although familiarity with research genres benefits graduate students, few studies have explored the influences of instruction on learners’ subsequent generic practices. In this study, we [...] Read more.
Genre pedagogy plays an important role in helping graduate students to enter the discourse community of their fields. Although familiarity with research genres benefits graduate students, few studies have explored the influences of instruction on learners’ subsequent generic practices. In this study, we describe the genre-based approach used in a bilingual (English and Spanish) Applied Linguistics graduate course, which aimed to enhance students’ research genre awareness to allow them to be better able to confront their own work as investigators. The description of the course is followed by a study to determine if and how a research article discourse analysis task influenced the students’ academic writing in their own papers. Our research question was the following: To what extent can course instruction influence students’ academic writing? The study entails a survey to elicit students’ perspectives on the influence of the course and its tasks on their academic writing, as well as teachers’ comments on the students’ written work. Although learning to do research at the graduate level requires a broad range of competencies that go beyond genre awareness, the findings from the survey confirmed the positive effects of genre knowledge gains in accomplishing further research goals. Full article
Open AccessArticle Unexpected Emails to Submit Your Work: Spam or Legitimate Offers? The Implications for Novice English L2 Writers
Received: 15 November 2018 / Revised: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 16 January 2019 / Published: 22 January 2019
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Abstract
This article analyzes the discourse of what have been termed ‘predatory publishers’, with a corpus of emails sent to scholars by hitherto unknown publishers. Equipped with sociolinguistic and discourse analytic tools, we argue that the interpretation of these texts as spam or as [...] Read more.
This article analyzes the discourse of what have been termed ‘predatory publishers’, with a corpus of emails sent to scholars by hitherto unknown publishers. Equipped with sociolinguistic and discourse analytic tools, we argue that the interpretation of these texts as spam or as legitimate messages may not be as straightforward an operation as one may initially believe. We suggest that English L2 scholars might potentially be more affected by publishers who engage in these email practices in several ways, which we identify and discuss. However, we argue that examining academic inequalities in scholarly publishing based exclusively on the native/non-native English speaker divide might not be sufficient, nor may it be enough to simply raise awareness about such publishers. Instead, we argue in favor of a more sociologically informed analysis of academic publishing, something that we see as a necessary first step if we wish to enhance more democratic means of access to key resources in publishing. Full article

Other

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Open AccessDiscussion Unpacking the Lore on Multilingual Scholars Publishing in English: A Discussion Paper
Publications 2019, 7(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7020027
Received: 7 February 2019 / Revised: 22 March 2019 / Accepted: 2 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2019
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Abstract
In the past three decades, a body of research on issues related to multilingual scholars writing for publication has emerged, paralleling the rise of pressures on scholars around the world to publish their work in high-status journals, especially those included in particular journal [...] Read more.
In the past three decades, a body of research on issues related to multilingual scholars writing for publication has emerged, paralleling the rise of pressures on scholars around the world to publish their work in high-status journals, especially those included in particular journal citation indexes; these indexes typically privilege the use of English. Researchers have investigated multilingual scholars’ experiences and perspectives, the social contexts of their work, policies on research publishing, aspects of the texts produced by multilingual scholars, the kinds of people scholars interact with while working to publish their research, their collaborations and networks, and pedagogical initiatives to support their publishing efforts. Nevertheless, as ongoing research is conducted, the existing research base has not always been consulted in meaningful ways. In this paper, we draw on the notion of ‘lore’ to identify some of the preconceptions or received wisdom about multilingual scholars and their writing that seem to be circulating, then argue for researchers to move beyond the ‘lore’ and make greater use of both findings from empirical research and related theoretical and methodological conversations. We identify directions for future research to be conducted. Full article
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