Special Issue "Smart Polymeric Nanoparticles for Applications in Nanomedicine"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Joaquin Sanchis Martinez
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia
Interests: drug delivery; polymers; bioconjugation; imaging; biocatalysis
Dr. Nghia P. Truong
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials, ETH Zürich, HCI F531, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland
Interests: polymer chemistry; nanomedicine; drug delivery; antimicrobial materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit your excellent work in the synthesis, characterisation and application of smart polymeric nanoparticles in nanomedicine to this special issue of Polymers.

Polymer chemists have significantly contributed to the field of nanomedicine by developing new synthesis methods to produce novel polymers and innovative self-assembly techniques (e.g., polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) or temperature-induced self-assembly (TMIT)) to prepare polymeric nanoparticles. Importantly, these polymeric nanoparticles can respond to stimuli (e.g., pH, temperature, light, magnetic field, reactive oxygen species (ROS), etc.) or self-degrade in a controlled manner to release therapeutics encapsulated (drugs, siRNA, mRNA, pDNA, protein, enzyme, etc.).  These particles can also be functionalised with biomolecules and hence can target or bind to the targeted cells.

Despite the initial tremendous success of the field, polymeric nanoparticles are still far from perfect, and the majority of the nanoparticle systems developed have not been successfully translated to the clinic. Therefore, extra efforts from the polymer chemist community are urgently needed to develop better polymeric nanoparticles for a variety of clinical applications in nanomedicine.

This Special Issue aims to highlight outstanding work and review articles that will advance the field nanomedicine. All manuscripts reporting the novel synthesis, characterisation and application of smart polymeric nanoparticles and their hybrids (with inorganic nanomaterials, lipids, etc.) are welcome.

We look forward to receiving your high-quality manuscript.

Dr. Nghia P. Truong
Dr. Joaquin Sanchis Martinez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanoparticles
  • Stimuli responsive, smart, hybrid, nanomedicine
  • Drug delivery
  • Diagnostics
  • MRI
  • Release
  • Diseases

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Efficacy of A Novel Smart Polymeric Nanodrug in the Treatment of Experimental Wounds in Rats
Polymers 2020, 12(5), 1126; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051126 - 14 May 2020
Abstract
High-quality and aesthetic wound healing, as well as effective medical support of this process, continue to be relevant. This study aims to evaluate the medical efficacy of a novel smart polymeric nanodrug (SPN) on the rate and mechanism of wound healing in experimental [...] Read more.
High-quality and aesthetic wound healing, as well as effective medical support of this process, continue to be relevant. This study aims to evaluate the medical efficacy of a novel smart polymeric nanodrug (SPN) on the rate and mechanism of wound healing in experimental animals. The study was carried out in male Wistar rats (aged 8–9 months). In these animals, identical square wounds down to the fascia were made in non-sterile conditions on the back on both sides of the vertebra. SPN was used for the treatment of one wound, and the other wound was left without treatment (control group). Biocompatible citrate-stabilized cerium oxide nanoparticles integrated into a polysaccharide hydrogel matrix containing natural and synthetic polysaccharide polymers (pectin, alginate, chitosan, agar-agar, water-soluble cellulose derivatives) were used as the therapeutic agent. Changes in the wound sizes (area, volume) over time and wound temperature were assessed on Days 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14. Histological examination of the wounds was performed on Days 3, 7, and 14. The study showed that the use of SPN accelerated wound healing in comparison with control wounds by inhibiting the inflammatory response, which was measured by a decreased number of white blood cells in SPN-treated wounds. It also accelerated the development of fibroblasts, with an early onset of new collagen synthesis, which eventually led to the formation of more tender postoperative scars. Thus, the study demonstrated that the use of SPN for the treatment of wounds was effective and promising. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Polymeric Nanoparticles for Applications in Nanomedicine)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
New Kind of Polymer Materials Based on Selected Complexing Star-Shaped Polyethers
Polymers 2019, 11(10), 1554; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11101554 - 24 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In today’s analytical trends, there is an ever-increasing importance of polymeric materials for low molecular weight compounds including amines and drugs because they can act as carriers or capture amines or drugs. The use of this type of materials will allow the development [...] Read more.
In today’s analytical trends, there is an ever-increasing importance of polymeric materials for low molecular weight compounds including amines and drugs because they can act as carriers or capture amines or drugs. The use of this type of materials will allow the development of modern materials for the chromatographic column beds and the substrates of selective sensors. Moreover, these kinds of materials could be used as a drug carrier. Therefore, the aim of this study is presenting the synthesis and complexing properties of star-shaped oxiranes as a new sensor for the selective complexation of low molecular weight compounds. Propylene oxide and selected oxirane monomers with carbazolyl in the substituent were selected as the monomers in this case and tetrahydrofuran as its solvent. The obtained polymer structures were characterized using the MALDI-TOF. It was found that in the initiation step potassium hydride deprotonates the monomer molecule and takes also part in the nucleophilic substitution. The resulting polymeric material preferably cross-linked with selected di-oxiranes (1,2,7,8-diepoksyoktan in respect ratio 3:1 according to active center) was then used as a stationary phase in the column and thin layer chromatography for amine separation and identification. Sorption ability of the resulting deposits was determined using a quartz microbalance (QCMB). The study was carried out in stationary mode and flow cells to simulate actual operating phase conditions. Based on changes in electrode vibration frequency, the maximum amount of adsorbed analyte and the best conditions for its sorption were determined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Polymeric Nanoparticles for Applications in Nanomedicine)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop