Current Trends in Polymeric Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 January 2023) | Viewed by 8191

Special Issue Editors

Formerly: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
Interests: biomaterials; hydrogels; protein-based biomaterials; tissue engineering; electroconductive hydrogels; 3D printing; neural regeneration; mechanobiology; complex mechanical hydrogel and tissue properties; cell–material interaction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. Department of Chemistry, Faraday Building, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB, UK
2. Materials Science Institute, Faraday Building, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB, UK
Interests: polymer synthesis; supramolecular materials; biomaterials; stimuli-responsive materials; drug delivery; tissue engineering; sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,  

Soft tissue regeneration that successfully rebuilds the complexity and function of healthy tissue is a significant challenge that has drawn the attention of researchers and clinicians worldwide. One current research focus is the generation of hydrogel-based biomaterials that interface with biological systems, tailored to trigger specific cell responses. Such hydrogels increasingly include instructive components, e.g., ligands designed to control specific cell–material interactions, immunomodulation, or properties to influence cell protein synthesis, as well as three-dimensional arrangements of multiphasic materials, with a key focus on stimuli-responsive materials.

This Special Issue aims to showcase recent studies that represent current trends in the field of hydrogels for tissue engineering, ranging from advances in chemical modifications to embed functionality, to the rise of modern fabrication techniques which serve to produce complex and ordered hydrogel structures that emulate the native cell environment. We welcome submission of communications, full papers, and reviews. Authors across the globe are invited, particularly from multidisciplinary teams of researchers in academic, government, and industry settings.

Dr. Thomas Distler
Dr. John G. Hardy
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • hydrogels
  • biomaterials
  • tissue engineering
  • 3D printing
  • functional hydrogels
  • stimuli-responsive hydrogels
  • immunomodulatory hydrogels
  • multiphasic gels
  • granular hydrogels
  • electroactive hydrogels

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 2384 KiB  
Article
Investigation and Characterization of Factors Affecting Rheological Properties of Poloxamer-Based Thermo-Sensitive Hydrogel
Polymers 2022, 14(24), 5353; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14245353 - 07 Dec 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2155
Abstract
Poloxamers are negatively temperature-sensitive hydrogels and their hydrophilic groups interact with water molecules at lower temperatures (liquid phase) while their hydrophobic groups interact more strongly with increases in temperature causing gelation. To investigate the factors affecting the rheological properties of poloxamers, various parameters [...] Read more.
Poloxamers are negatively temperature-sensitive hydrogels and their hydrophilic groups interact with water molecules at lower temperatures (liquid phase) while their hydrophobic groups interact more strongly with increases in temperature causing gelation. To investigate the factors affecting the rheological properties of poloxamers, various parameters including different poloxamer P407 concentrations, poloxamers P407/P188 blending ratios and additives were examined. The results presented a clear trend of decreasing gelling temperature/time when P407 was at higher concentrations. Moreover, the addition of P188 enhanced the gelling temperature regardless of poloxamer concentration. Polysaccharides and their derivatives have been widely used as components of hydrogel and we found that alginic acid (AA) or carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) reduced the gelling temperature of poloxamers. In addition, AA-containing poloxamer promoted cell proliferation and both AA -and CMC-containing poloxamer hydrogels reduced cell migration. This study investigated the intriguing characteristics of poloxamer-based hydrogel, providing useful information to compounding an ideal and desired thermo-sensitive hydrogel for further potential clinical applications such as development of sprayable anti-adhesive barrier, wound-healing dressings or injectable drug-delivery system for cartilage repair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Polymeric Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering)
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19 pages, 3012 KiB  
Article
Electrochemically Enhanced Delivery of Pemetrexed from Electroactive Hydrogels
Polymers 2022, 14(22), 4953; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14224953 - 16 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2250
Abstract
Electroactive hydrogels based on derivatives of polyethyleneglycol (PEG), chitosan and polypyrrole were prepared via a combination of photopolymerization and oxidative chemical polymerization, and optionally doped with anions (e.g., lignin, drugs, etc.). The products were analyzed with a variety of techniques, including: FT-IR, UV-Vis, [...] Read more.
Electroactive hydrogels based on derivatives of polyethyleneglycol (PEG), chitosan and polypyrrole were prepared via a combination of photopolymerization and oxidative chemical polymerization, and optionally doped with anions (e.g., lignin, drugs, etc.). The products were analyzed with a variety of techniques, including: FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR (solution state), 13C NMR (solid state), XRD, TGA, SEM, swelling ratios and rheology. The conductive gels swell ca. 8 times less than the non-conductive gels due to the presence of the interpenetrating network (IPN) of polypyrrole and lignin. A rheological study showed that the non-conductive gels are soft (G′ 0.35 kPa, G″ 0.02 kPa) with properties analogous to brain tissue, whereas the conductive gels are significantly stronger (G′ 30 kPa, G″ 19 kPa) analogous to breast tissue due to the presence of the IPN of polypyrrole and lignin. The potential of these biomaterials to be used for biomedical applications was validated in vitro by cell culture studies (assessing adhesion and proliferation of fibroblasts) and drug delivery studies (electrochemically loading the FDA-approved chemotherapeutic pemetrexed and measuring passive and stimulated release); indeed, the application of electrical stimulus enhanced the release of PEM from gels by ca. 10–15% relative to the passive release control experiment for each application of electrical stimulation over a short period analogous to the duration of stimulation applied for electrochemotherapy. It is foreseeable that such materials could be integrated in electrochemotherapeutic medical devices, e.g., electrode arrays or plates currently used in the clinic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Polymeric Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering)
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10 pages, 3558 KiB  
Article
Electroactive Oxidized Alginate/Gelatin/MXene (Ti3C2Tx) Composite Hydrogel with Improved Biocompatibility and Self-Healing Property
Polymers 2022, 14(18), 3908; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14183908 - 19 Sep 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2960 | Correction
Abstract
Conductive hydrogels (CHs) have shown promising potential applied as wearable or epidermal sensors owing to their mechanical adaptability and similarity to natural tissues. However, it remains a great challenge to develop an integrated hydrogel combining outstanding conductive, self-healing and biocompatible performances with simple [...] Read more.
Conductive hydrogels (CHs) have shown promising potential applied as wearable or epidermal sensors owing to their mechanical adaptability and similarity to natural tissues. However, it remains a great challenge to develop an integrated hydrogel combining outstanding conductive, self-healing and biocompatible performances with simple approaches. In this work, we propose a “one-pot” strategy to synthesize multifunctional CHs by incorporating two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides/nitrides (MXenes) multi-layer nano-flakes as nanofillers into oxidized alginate and gelatin hydrogels to form the composite CHs with various MXene contents. The presence of MXene with abundant surface groups and outstanding conductivity could improve the mechanical property and electroactivity of the composite hydrogels compared to pure oxidized alginate dialdehyde-gelatin (ADA-GEL). MXene-ADA-GELs kept good self-healing properties due to the dynamic imine linkage of the ADA-GEL network and have a promoting effect on mouse fibroblast (NH3T3s) attachment and spreading, which could be a result of the integration of MXenes with stimulating conductivity and hydrophily surface. This study suggests that the electroactive MXene-ADA-GELs can serve as an appealing candidate for skin wound healing and flexible bio-electronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Polymeric Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering)
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