Special Issue "Hybrid Adhesive and Coatings for Medical Applications"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Hanna Dodiuk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Shenkar - Engineering. Design. Art., Department of Polymer Materials Engineering, Ramat Gan, Israel
Interests: adhesives; coatings; nanotechnology; nanoparticles; biomedical
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Dan Lewitus
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Shenkar - Engineering. Design. Art., Department of Polymers and Plastics Engineering, Ramat Gan, Israel
Interests: biomaterials; polymers; adhesives; composites; drug delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The application of hybrid systems, which combine synthetic polymers with biological-sourced materials, including small molecules, proteins, ceramics, etc., has seen, in recent years, a tremendous increase in medical and biomedical applications.

This Special Issue of Polymers, titled “Hybrid Adhesive and Coatings for Medical Applications” focuses on adhesive and coating materials, which may combine synthetic polymers, synthetic and natural nanoparticles, and bio-based polymer and biomolecules. These may be pertinent in a wide range of applications, ranging from medical device coatings (such as lubricious and antithrombogenic catheter coatings), through dental adhesives and fillings, and many more.

The goal of this Special Issue is to publish original research articles and critical reviews from cutting-edge scientists, in both academia and industry, on all aspects related to the recent advances in the design, synthesis, development, application and challenges in “Hybrid Adhesive and Coatings for Medical Applications”. We intend to publish both hands-on, application-oriented papers, along with papers that explore the fundamental structure–property relationships for such hybrid systems.

Prof. Hanna Dodiuk
Dr. Dan Lewitus
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Adhesives
  • Coatings
  • Natural/Synthetic Hybrid materials
  • Synthetic polymers
  • Natural polymers
  • Biomolecules
  • Biomaterilas

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Hybrid Antibacterial and Electro-Conductive Coating for Textiles Based on Cationic Conjugated Polymer
Polymers 2020, 12(7), 1517; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12071517 - 08 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 815
Abstract
The development of efficient synthetic strategies for incorporating antibacterial coatings into textiles for pharma and medical applications is of great interest. This paper describes the preparation of functional nonwoven fabrics coated with polyaniline (PANI) via in situ polymerization of aniline in aqueous solution. [...] Read more.
The development of efficient synthetic strategies for incorporating antibacterial coatings into textiles for pharma and medical applications is of great interest. This paper describes the preparation of functional nonwoven fabrics coated with polyaniline (PANI) via in situ polymerization of aniline in aqueous solution. The effect of three different monomer concentrations on the level of polyaniline coating on the fibers comprising the fabrics, and its electrical resistivities and antibacterial attributes, were studied. Experimental results indicated that weight gains of 0.7 and 3.0 mg/cm2 of PANI were achieved. These levels of coatings led to the reduction of both volume and surface resistivities by several orders of magnitude for PANI-coated polyester-viscose fabrics, i.e., from 108 to 105 (Ω/cm) and from 109 to 105 Ω/square, respectively. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) confirmed the incorporation of PANI coating with an average thickness of 0.4–1.5 µm, while Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) demonstrated the preservation of the thermal stability of the pristine fabrics. The unique molecular structure of PANI, consisting of quaternary ammonium ions under acidic conditions, yielded an antibacterial effect in the modified fabrics. The results revealed that all types of PANI-coated fabrics totally killed S. aureus bacteria, while PANI-coated viscose fabrics also demonstrated 100% elimination of S. epidermidis bacteria. In addition, PANI-coated, PET-viscose and PET fabrics showed 2.5 log and 5.5 log reductions against S. epidermidis, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Adhesive and Coatings for Medical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
The Grafting of Multifunctional Antithrombogenic Chemical Networks on Polyurethane Intravascular Catheters
Polymers 2020, 12(5), 1131; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051131 - 15 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 810
Abstract
Intravascular catheters (IVCs) and other medical tubing are commonly made of polymeric materials such as polyurethane (PU). Polymers tend to be fouled by surface absorption of proteins and platelets, often resulting in the development of bacterial infections and thrombosis during catheterization, which can [...] Read more.
Intravascular catheters (IVCs) and other medical tubing are commonly made of polymeric materials such as polyurethane (PU). Polymers tend to be fouled by surface absorption of proteins and platelets, often resulting in the development of bacterial infections and thrombosis during catheterization, which can lead to embolism and death. Existing solutions to fouling are based on coating the IVCs with hydrophilic, anti-thrombogenic, or antimicrobial materials. However, the delamination of the coatings themselves is associated with significant morbidity, as reported by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We developed a lubricious, antimicrobial, and antithrombogenic coating complex, which can be covalently attached to the surface of industrial PU catheters. The coating complex is pre-synthesized and comprises 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) as an antifouling agent, covalently attached to branched polyethyleneimine (bPEI) as a lubricating agent. The two-step coating procedure involves PU-amine surface activation using a diisocyanate, followed by chemical grafting of the bPEI-S-MPC complex. Compared with neat PU, the coating was found to reduce the coefficient of friction of the IVC surface by 30% and the hemolysis ratio by more than 50%. Moreover, the coating exhibited a significant antimicrobial activity under JIS Z2801:2000 standard compared with neat PU. Finally, in in-vivo acute rabbit model studies, the coating exhibited significant antithrombogenic properties, reducing the thrombogenic potential to a score of 1.3 on coated surfaces compared with 3.3 on uncoated surfaces. The materials and process developed could confer lubricious, antithrombogenic, and antimicrobial properties on pre-existing PU-based catheters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Adhesive and Coatings for Medical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Anionic Polymer Brushes for Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Mineralization—A Surface with Application Potential in Biomaterials
Polymers 2018, 10(10), 1165; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym10101165 - 18 Oct 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2703
Abstract
This article describes the synthesis of anionic polymer brushes and their mineralization with calcium phosphate. The brushes are based on poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt) providing a highly charged polymer brush surface. Homogeneous brushes with reproducible thicknesses are obtained via surface-initiated atom transfer radical [...] Read more.
This article describes the synthesis of anionic polymer brushes and their mineralization with calcium phosphate. The brushes are based on poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt) providing a highly charged polymer brush surface. Homogeneous brushes with reproducible thicknesses are obtained via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Mineralization with doubly concentrated simulated body fluid yields polymer/inorganic hybrid films containing AB-Type carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHAP), a material resembling the inorganic component of bone. Moreover, growth experiments using Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae demonstrate that the mineral-free and the mineral-containing polymer brushes have a good biocompatibility suggesting their use as biocompatible surfaces in implantology or related fields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Adhesive and Coatings for Medical Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Polymers in the Medical Antiviral Front-Line
Polymers 2020, 12(8), 1727; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12081727 - 31 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1290
Abstract
Antiviral polymers are part of a major campaign led by the scientific community in recent years. Facing this most demanding of campaigns, two main approaches have been undertaken by scientists. First, the classic approach involves the development of relatively small molecules having antiviral [...] Read more.
Antiviral polymers are part of a major campaign led by the scientific community in recent years. Facing this most demanding of campaigns, two main approaches have been undertaken by scientists. First, the classic approach involves the development of relatively small molecules having antiviral properties to serve as drugs. The other approach involves searching for polymers with antiviral properties to be used as prescription medications or viral spread prevention measures. This second approach took two distinct directions. The first, using polymers as antiviral drug-delivery systems, taking advantage of their biodegradable properties. The second, using polymers with antiviral properties for on-contact virus elimination, which will be the focus of this review. Anti-viral polymers are obtained by either the addition of small antiviral molecules (such as metal ions) to obtain ion-containing polymers with antiviral properties or the use of polymers composed of an organic backbone and electrically charged moieties like polyanions, such as carboxylate containing polymers, or polycations such as quaternary ammonium containing polymers. Other approaches include moieties hybridized by sulphates, carboxylic acids, or amines and/or combining repeating units with a similar chemical structure to common antiviral drugs. Furthermore, elevated temperatures appear to increase the anti-viral effect of ions and other functional moieties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Adhesive and Coatings for Medical Applications)
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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceReview
Modifications of Polymeric Membranes Used in Guided Tissue and Bone Regeneration
Polymers 2019, 11(5), 782; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11050782 - 02 May 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 1373
Abstract
Guided tissue/bone regeneration (GTR/GBR) is a widely used procedure in contemporary dentistry. To achieve the required results of tissue regeneration, soft tissues that reproduce quickly are separated from the slow-growing bone tissue by membranes. Many types of membranes are currently in use, but [...] Read more.
Guided tissue/bone regeneration (GTR/GBR) is a widely used procedure in contemporary dentistry. To achieve the required results of tissue regeneration, soft tissues that reproduce quickly are separated from the slow-growing bone tissue by membranes. Many types of membranes are currently in use, but none of them fulfil all of the desired features. To address this issue, further research on developing new membranes with better separation characteristics, such as membrane modification, is needed. Many of the current innovative modified materials are still in the phase of in vitro and experimental studies. A collective review on new trends in membrane modification to GTR/GBR is needed due to the widespread use of polymeric membranes and the constant development in the field of dentistry. Therefore, the aim of this review was to present an overview of polymeric membrane modifications to the GTR/GBR reported in the literature. The authors searched databases, including PubMed, SCOPUS, Web of Science, and OVID, for relevant studies that were published during 1999–2019. The following keywords were used: guided tissue regeneration, membranes, coating, and modification. A total of 17 papers were included in this review. Furthermore, the articles were divided into three groups that were based on the type of membrane modification: antibiotic coating, ion-use modifications, and others modifications, thus providing an overview of current existing knowledge in the field and encouraging further research. The results of included studies on modified barrier membranes seem to be promising, both in terms of safety and benefits for patients. However, modifications result in a large spectrum of effects. Further clinical studies are needed on a large group of patients to clearly confirm the effects that were observed in animal and in vitro studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Adhesive and Coatings for Medical Applications)
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