Advances in Textile Based Polymer Composites

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Fibers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 November 2024 | Viewed by 1661

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Material Science and Manufacturing Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamycka 129, 165 00 Prague 6, Suchdol, Czech Republic
Interests: bio-based composite materials; textile structural composites; fibrous material science; nanomaterials in composites; green composite
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The direction of fiber orientation plays a crucial role in deciding the mechanical performance of textile structural composites. Unlike conventional composite materials, geometrically oriented textile structures, e.g., woven, knitted, and braided constructions, can be designed and developed for load bearing in a particular direction. Their properties can be enhanced by modifying the geometry and material composition. One major challenge in producing textile structural composites with superior mechanical properties at a reasonably lower price is cost effective prepreg. Composites constructed with reinforcement by a well-defined geometry perform better than randomly oriented fibers at a reasonable cost. Their flex fatigue is superior to conventional preforms in specific applications. This Special Issue invites research as well as review articles dealing with different types of (2D, 3D, multiaxial) woven, knitted, and braided structures for load-bearing structural composite applications. The use of industrial multifilament yarns of pure and hybrid composition in textile geometrical reinforcement structures can also be included. The methods of impregnation of such structures by thermoplastic and thermoset resins should be described. The superior performance in such structural composites must be highlighted. Methods of characterizing woven, knitted, and braided textile reinforced composites are the focus of this Special Issue. Current and future applications of advanced textile structural composites can be summarized in the submitted articles. Theoretical (computational, numerical simulation, etc.) as well as experimental work can be submitted with sufficient scientific innovation.

Prof. Dr. Rajesh Mishra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • textile structures
  • woven
  • knitted
  • braided composites
  • 3D woven composites
  • multiaxial fabric composite
  • modeling of structural composites
  • mechanical performance
  • thermoset
  • thermoplastic

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 4035 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Melt-Spun Recycled PA 6 Polymer by Adding ZnO Nanoparticles during the Extrusion Process
by Anja Ludaš Dujmić, Rafaela Radičić, Sanja Ercegović Ražić, Ivan Karlo Cingesar, Martinia Glogar, Andrea Jurov and Nikša Krstulović
Polymers 2024, 16(13), 1883; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16131883 - 1 Jul 2024
Viewed by 432
Abstract
With recent technological advances and the growing interest in environmentally friendly fiber production processes, the textile industry is increasingly turning to the spinning of filaments from recycled raw materials in the melt spinning process as the simplest method of chemical spinning of fibers. [...] Read more.
With recent technological advances and the growing interest in environmentally friendly fiber production processes, the textile industry is increasingly turning to the spinning of filaments from recycled raw materials in the melt spinning process as the simplest method of chemical spinning of fibers. Such processes are more efficient because the desired active particles are melt-spun together with the polymer. The study investigates the melt spinning of recycled polyamide 6 (PA 6) fibers modified with zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 2.0 wt% of the polymer. The extrusion process was optimized under laboratory conditions. An analysis of the effectiveness of the nanoparticle distribution and chemical composition was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results of the thermal analysis show an increase in the glass transition temperature of the extruded material from 50.97 °C (raw polymer) to 51.40 °C to 57.98 °C (polymer modified with ZnO NPs) and an increase in the crystallization point from 148.19 °C to a temperature between 175.61 °C and 178.16 °C, while the molar enthalpy (ΔHm) shows a decreasing trend from 65.66 Jg−1 (raw polymer) to 48.23 Jg−1 (PA 6 2.0% ZnO). The FTIR spectra indicate PA 6 polymer, with a characteristic peak at the wavelength 1466 cm−1, but pure ZnO and PA 6 blended with ZnO show a characteristic peak at 2322 cm−1. The distribution of nanoparticles on the fiber surface is more or less randomly distributed and the different size of NPs is visible. These results are confirmed by the EDS results, which show that different concentrations of Zn are present. The mechanical stability of the extruded polymer modified with NPs is not affected by the addition of ZnO NPs, although the overall results of strength (2.56–3.22 cN/tex) and modulus of elasticity of the polymer (28.83–49.90 cN/tex) are lower as there is no drawing process at this stage of the experiment, which certainly helps to increase the final strength of the fibers. The results indicate the potential of modification with ZnO NPs for further advances in sustainable fiber production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Textile Based Polymer Composites)
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22 pages, 14987 KiB  
Article
Computational Analysis of Mechanical Properties in Polymeric Sandwich Composite Materials
by Robert Kohar, Jaroslav Miskolci, Lukas Pompas, Lubos Kucera, Peter Stevko, Michal Petru and Rajesh Kumar Mishra
Polymers 2024, 16(5), 673; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16050673 - 1 Mar 2024
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Abstract
This article focuses on the computational analysis of sandwich composite materials based on polypropylene, polyester, glass, and cotton fibers. In the automotive components prepared from these fiber materials, the various components are used in different proportions. Through the manufacturing process, isotropic materials become [...] Read more.
This article focuses on the computational analysis of sandwich composite materials based on polypropylene, polyester, glass, and cotton fibers. In the automotive components prepared from these fiber materials, the various components are used in different proportions. Through the manufacturing process, isotropic materials become somewhat anisotropic. Part of this article is aimed at obtaining input values of material characteristics for calculations using finite element analysis (FEM) and the comparison of experimental results with FEM-based material models created using the Digimat 2023.1 software. This article analyzes the modeling of two-phase as well as multiphase composite materials. This work focuses on calculations using FEM according to the test defined in the PR375 standard for loading the finished product in the luggage compartment of a car. The defined methodology enables the application of the FEM-based calculation directly to the product design in the initial phase of research. The construction and production of expensive prototypes and the subsequent production of automotive parts is replaced by computer-based simulation. This procedure makes it possible to simulate several optimization cycles over a relatively shorter time. From the results of computational simulations, it is clear that materials based on PP/PET/glass fibers show a much higher modulus of elasticity than materials created using cotton, i.e., materials of the PP/PET/cotton type. In order to achieve a high strength and stiffness, it is, therefore, appropriate to use glass fibers in the composite materials used for such applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Textile Based Polymer Composites)
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