Special Issue "Materials and Methods for New Technologies in Polymer Processing II"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Processing and Performance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Andrea Sorrentino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials (IPCB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Via Previati 1/C, 23900 Lecco, Italy
Interests: process–properties relashionships; morphology and properties of polymeric materials; polymer processing; injection and compression moulding; nanofunctionalized polymer materials for barrier and electrical applications; polymer (bio/photo)-degradation; bionanocomposites materials; thermomechanical properties; biodegradable materials; high performances composite materials; materials for sensing; materials for drug delivery; self-healing materials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Welcome to this, the second issue of “Materials and Methods for New Technologies in Polymer Processing”. Due to the great interest in the first issue, the editorial board decided to reopen this Special Issue focused on the emerging technologies in polymer processing. I am delighted to write the foreword for this second number, which once again affords us the opportunity to reflect on what is changing in our field.

Last year, we recognized the need for a programmatic approach to the difficult relationships between new technologies associated with the plastics industry and existing materials. Formally, with these new techniques, it is possible to transform, combine, and functionalize polymer and composite materials in any desired way. Practically, the lack of materials properties, as well as inadequate process modeling and control, strongly limits these amazing possibilities. Applications such as the optoelectronic, sensing, drug release, filtration, and biomedical require extremely tight dimensional tolerances and precise manipulation of the properties. Such rigorous control can be obtained only with a proper combination of the right materials and methods.

This second Special Issue will continue to collect research and review documents that examine new technologies in polymer processing from different perspectives, covering materials, machine control, and simulation software, with particular attention to the properties of the products obtained.

We encourage you to contribute to this scientific program by submitting your papers and look forward to your active involvement.

Dr. Andrea Sorrentino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • New polymer processing
  • Process–properties relationships
  • Morphology of polymeric materials
  • Thermomechanical and rheological properties
  • Polymer functionalizations
  • Bionanocomposites materials
  • Materials for barrier and electronic applications
  • Filament and fibers production
  • Foams and lightweight materials
  • Coatings for surface protection
  • Micro parts productions
  • Structured and functional surfaces
  • Fabrication of drug delivery systems
  • Capsules and bubbles formations
  • Materials for sensing and actuation
  • Electrospinning
  • Spray coating
  • Laser sintering
  • Layer by layer deposition
  • Additive manufacturing
  • Microfluidics
  • Precision injection and compression molding
  • Extrusion and compounding
  • Plasma treatment
  • Ultrasound assisted processes
  • Freeze and spray dryers

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A New Vacuum Pressure Infiltration CFRP Method and Preparation Experimental Study of Composite
Polymers 2020, 12(2), 419; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12020419 - 12 Feb 2020
Abstract
In order to prepare a carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composite (CFRP) with ideal microstructure and properties, a new vacuum pressure infiltration CFRP method is proposed based on an analysis of existing CFRP preparation process methods. Research on composite material preparation systems was carried out by [...] Read more.
In order to prepare a carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composite (CFRP) with ideal microstructure and properties, a new vacuum pressure infiltration CFRP method is proposed based on an analysis of existing CFRP preparation process methods. Research on composite material preparation systems was carried out by using this new method principle. The system mainly includes a fiber pre-forming module, a vacuum heating infiltration module, a hot-press curing molding module, and a data acquisition control module. Under the conditions of natural curing at 0 MPa + 6 h + 25 ℃, vacuum heating curing at –0.05 MPa + 30 min + 80 ℃, and hot-press curing at 0.7 MPa + 5 min + 50 ℃, a two-dimensional (2D) CFRP with excellent microstructure and properties was successfully prepared. Observing the microstructure of the prepared composite material, it can be found that the inside of the composite material was sufficiently and uniformly infiltrated, and common preparation defects such as holes and delamination were effectively controlled. Through the performance test, the bending strength of the material reached 790 MPa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials and Methods for New Technologies in Polymer Processing II)
Open AccessArticle
High Throughput Manufacturing of Bio-Resorbable Micro-Porous Scaffolds Made of Poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) by Micro-Extrusion for Soft Tissue Engineering Applications
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010034 - 24 Dec 2019
Abstract
Porous scaffolds made of elastomeric materials are of great interest for soft tissue engineering. Poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) is a bio-resorbable elastomeric copolymer with tailorable properties, which make this material an appropriate candidate to be used as scaffold for vascular, tendon, and nerve [...] Read more.
Porous scaffolds made of elastomeric materials are of great interest for soft tissue engineering. Poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) is a bio-resorbable elastomeric copolymer with tailorable properties, which make this material an appropriate candidate to be used as scaffold for vascular, tendon, and nerve healing applications. Here, extrusion was applied to produce porous scaffolds of PLCL, using NaCl particles as a leachable agent. The effects of the particle proportion and size on leaching performance, dimensional stability, mechanical properties, and ageing of the scaffolds were analyzed. The efficiency of the particle leaching and scaffold swelling when wet were observed to be dependent on the porogenerator proportion, while the secant moduli and ultimate tensile strengths were dependent on the pore size. Porosity, swelling, and mechanical properties of the extruded scaffolds were tailorable, varying with the proportion and size of porogenerator particles and showed similar values to human soft tissues like nerves and veins (E = 7–15 MPa, σu = 7 MPa). Up to 300-mm length micro-porous PLCL tube with 400-µm thickness wall was extruded, proving extrusion as a high-throughput manufacturing process to produce tubular elastomeric bio-resorbable porous scaffolds of unrestricted length with tunable mechanical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials and Methods for New Technologies in Polymer Processing II)
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Open AccessArticle
Electrical Current Map and Bulk Conductivity of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Nanocomposites
Polymers 2019, 11(11), 1865; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11111865 - 12 Nov 2019
Abstract
A suitably modified resin film infusion (RFI) process was used for manufacturing carbon fiber-reinforced composites (CFRCs) impregnated with a resin containing nanocages of glycidyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (GPOSS) for enhancing flame resistance and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to contrast the electrical insulating properties [...] Read more.
A suitably modified resin film infusion (RFI) process was used for manufacturing carbon fiber-reinforced composites (CFRCs) impregnated with a resin containing nanocages of glycidyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (GPOSS) for enhancing flame resistance and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to contrast the electrical insulating properties of the epoxy resin. The effects of the different numbers (7, 14 and 24) of the plies on the equivalent direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) electrical conductivity were evaluated. All the manufactured panels manifest very high values in electrical conductivity. Besides, for the first time, CFRC strings were analyzed by tunneling atomic force microscopy (TUNA) technique. The electrical current maps highlight electrically conductive three-dimensional networks incorporated in the resin through the plies of the panels. The highest equivalent bulk conductivity is shown by the seven-ply panel characterized by the parallel (σ//0°) in-plane conductivity of 16.19 kS/m. Electrical tests also evidence that the presence of GPOSS preserves the AC electrical stability of the panels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials and Methods for New Technologies in Polymer Processing II)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation and Evaluation of Glucose Based Non-Isocyanate Polyurethane Self-Blowing Rigid Foams
Polymers 2019, 11(11), 1802; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11111802 - 02 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A partially biobased self-blowing and self-hardening polyurethane foam from glucose-based non-isocyanate polyurethanes (g-NIPU) was prepared by reaction of glucose with dimethyl carbonate and hexamethylene diamine. However, these foam types generally require a high foaming temperature. In this paper, a self-blowing foam based on [...] Read more.
A partially biobased self-blowing and self-hardening polyurethane foam from glucose-based non-isocyanate polyurethanes (g-NIPU) was prepared by reaction of glucose with dimethyl carbonate and hexamethylene diamine. However, these foam types generally require a high foaming temperature. In this paper, a self-blowing foam based on g-NIPU was prepared at room temperature by using maleic acid as an initiator and glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker. Water absorption, compression resistance, and fire resistance were tested. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the foam cells structure. Middle infrared (ATR FT-MIR) and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry were used to help to analyze the reactions during the foaming process. The results obtained showed that self- blowing rigid foams have good compression, this being directly proportional to the foam density. Increasing the amount of glutaraldehyde or reducing maleic acid thickens the cell walls and increases the density of the foams. MALDI-TOF analysis showed that g-NIPU reacts with both maleic acid and glutaraldehyde. The foams presented poor fire resistance indicating that, as for isocyanate based polyurethane foams, addition of a fire retardant would be necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials and Methods for New Technologies in Polymer Processing II)
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