Special Issue "Biodegradable and Sustainable Polymers"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Piotr Kurcok
Website
Guest Editor
1. Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34, M. Curie-Sklodowska Str., 41-819 Zabrze, Poland;
2. Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Jan Dlugosz University in Czestochowa, Poland
Interests: sustainable polymers, biocompatible polymer systems; biodegradable polymers; bioactive oligomers; controlled drug delivery systems; ring-opening polymerization; polymers for biomedical applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Petrochemical plastics have gradually become an integral part of our daily lives due to their increased use in a wide range of daily activities. Polymers are everywhere, even in the human body. However, commonly used petroleum-based polymer materials, in addition to many advantages, have many disadvantages, such as the ever-increasing adverse environmental impacts. Sustainable polymer materials, produced from renewable feedstocks,  meet the needs of consumers without damaging our environment, health, and economy. Biodegradable polymers seem to be the solution to many of these problems. Interest in these sustainable polymers has been growing immensely over the past decades.  The biocompatibility of biodegradable polymeric material-host system broadens the possibilities of their applications, e.g., in regenerative medicine and pharmacy.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present the recent advances in the field of sustainable polymers including biodegradable (co)polymers synthesis, modification, and application. It is my pleasure to invite you to contribute an article to this Special Issue. Reviews, full papers, and communications concerning current trends in biodegradable (co)polymers synthesis, characterization, and application are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Piotr Kurcok
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biodegradable polymers
  • biocompatible polymer systems
  • medical applications
  • sustainable materials
  • delivery systems

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Transparent Ultraviolet (UV)-Shielding Films Made from Waste Hemp Hurd and Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA)
Polymers 2020, 12(5), 1190; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051190 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
This work proposes a new approach to fabricate highly transparent and flexible composite films that exhibit enhanced UV-shielding properties. Lignin has innate UV-shielding properties. However, when purified lignin, which is conventionally extracted through chemical treatment, is mixed with polymeric materials, its presence negatively [...] Read more.
This work proposes a new approach to fabricate highly transparent and flexible composite films that exhibit enhanced UV-shielding properties. Lignin has innate UV-shielding properties. However, when purified lignin, which is conventionally extracted through chemical treatment, is mixed with polymeric materials, its presence negatively influences the transparency of the resulting composite. High transparency and UV-shielding are desirable properties for many applications. In this study, composites were made by mixing lignocellulose particles and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), where lignocellulose particles were obtained from ball-milled waste hemp hurd without chemical treatments. The UV-shielding properties of the resulting composite film, as a function of hemp/PVA weight ratios, were investigated. The intermolecular interactions between the hemp particles and the PVA were characterized using infrared spectroscopy with the presence of –C=O group at 1655 cm−1, providing evidence that the chemical structure of lignin was preserved. The fabricated hemp/PVA films exhibit stronger UV-shielding, in the UVA-I range (340–400 nm) than TiO2/PVA films. The composite films also showed comparable water vapor permeability (WVP) with commercial packaging plastic film made of HDPE (high-density polyethylene). The optimization experiments were reported, with aim at understanding the balance between the UV-shielding and mechanical properties of the hemp/PVA films. The findings of this work can be applicable to the packaging, food and cosmetic industries where UV shielding is of utmost importance, hence adding value to hemp hurd waste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradable and Sustainable Polymers)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Production of Sustainable and Biodegradable Polymers from Agricultural Waste
Polymers 2020, 12(5), 1127; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051127 - 14 May 2020
Abstract
Agro-wastes are derived from diverse sources including grape pomace, tomato pomace, pineapple, orange, and lemon peels, sugarcane bagasse, rice husks, wheat straw, and palm oil fibers, among other affordable and commonly available materials. The carbon-rich precursors are used in the production bio-based polymers [...] Read more.
Agro-wastes are derived from diverse sources including grape pomace, tomato pomace, pineapple, orange, and lemon peels, sugarcane bagasse, rice husks, wheat straw, and palm oil fibers, among other affordable and commonly available materials. The carbon-rich precursors are used in the production bio-based polymers through microbial, biopolymer blending, and chemical methods. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that 20–30% of fruits and vegetables are discarded as waste during post-harvest handling. The development of bio-based polymers is essential, considering the scale of global environmental pollution that is directly linked to the production of synthetic plastics such as polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PET). Globally, 400 million tons of synthetic plastics are produced each year, and less than 9% are recycled. The optical, mechanical, and chemical properties such as ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, tensile strength, and water permeability are influenced by the synthetic route. The production of bio-based polymers from renewable sources and microbial synthesis are scalable, facile, and pose a minimal impact on the environment compared to chemical synthesis methods that rely on alkali and acid treatment or co-polymer blending. Despite the development of advanced synthetic methods and the application of biofilms in smart/intelligent food packaging, construction, exclusion nets, and medicine, commercial production is limited by cost, the economics of production, useful life, and biodegradation concerns, and the availability of adequate agro-wastes. New and cost-effective production techniques are critical to facilitate the commercial production of bio-based polymers and the replacement of synthetic polymers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradable and Sustainable Polymers)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop