Special Issue "Mechanism of Salinity Tolerance in Plants"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Devinder Sandhu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
US Salinity Laboratory (USDA-ARS), Riverside, CA, 92507, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Salinity is a common problem throughout the world and is among one of the most important abiotic stresses that lead to significant crop losses. The salinity problem is further pronounced with the increasing scarcity of good-quality irrigation water. To cope with growing food demand due to an increasing human population, there is a greater need to develop more sustainable crops to increase productivity by utilizing saline water for irrigation.

In the early phase of salinity exposure, plant growth is suppressed due to osmotic stress, which is then followed by specific ion toxicity. Osmotic stress leads to reduced water absorption by a plant, directly impacting transpiration, mineral nutrient balance, photosynthesis, membrane stability, and ability to detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ionic stress leads to accumulation of specific ions in different plant tissue, such as Na+ and Cl-, which results in ion imbalance and may lead to deficiencies of essential nutrients for growth and development. To survive in saline environments, plants employ certain strategies and acquire various adaptive mechanisms, which include ion uptake, ion exclusion, ion compartmentalization, ion transport and balance, osmotic regulation, compatible solute accumulation, hormone metabolism, antioxidant metabolism, and stress signaling.

In order to comprehend the complex salinity puzzle, it is vital to understand the genetic determinants that regulate morphological, physiological, cellular, and metabolic responses, which is critical to developing genetic material tolerant to salinity. Furthermore, knowledge concerning the genetics and physiology of tolerance mechanisms will contribute to the identification of trait-based selection criteria which are critical for the development of breeding programs aimed at marker-assisted improvement of crop salt tolerance.

The aim and scope of this Special Issue is to encourage the publication of reviews and/or experimental research dealing with morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular aspects related to salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants.

Dr. Devinder Sandhu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • salinity
  • salt tolerance
  • salt stress
  • glycophytes
  • gene expression
  • waste water
  • water management
  • ion composition
  • ion transport
  • channels
  • transporters
  • Na+ transport
  • Cl-transport
  • K+ transport
  • proline
  • reactive oxygen
  • osmolytes
  • osmoregulation
  • relative water content
  • antioxidant enzymes
  • osmoprotectants

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Regulation of Ammonium Cellular Levels is An Important Adaptive Trait for the Euhalophytic Behavior of Salicornia europaea
Plants 2020, 9(2), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020257 - 17 Feb 2020
Abstract
Salinization of agricultural land is a devastating phenomenon which will affect future food security. Understanding how plants survive and thrive in response to salinity is therefore critical to potentiate tolerance traits in crop species. The halophyte Salicornia europaea has been used as model [...] Read more.
Salinization of agricultural land is a devastating phenomenon which will affect future food security. Understanding how plants survive and thrive in response to salinity is therefore critical to potentiate tolerance traits in crop species. The halophyte Salicornia europaea has been used as model system for this purpose. High salinity causes NH4+ accumulation in plant tissues and consequent toxicity symptoms that may further exacerbate those caused by NaCl. In this experiment we exposed Salicornia plants to five concentrations of NaCl (0, 1, 10, 50 and 200 mM) in combination with two concentrations of NH4Cl (1 and 50 mM). We confirmed the euhalophytic behavior of Salicornia that grew better at 200 vs. 0 mM NaCl in terms of both fresh (+34%) and dry (+46%) weights. Addition of 50 mM NH4Cl to the growth medium caused a general growth reduction, which was likely caused by NH4+ accumulation and toxicity in roots and shoots. When plants were exposed to high NH4Cl, high salinity reduced roots NH4+ concentration (−50%) compared to 0 mM NaCl. This correlates with the activation of the NH4+ assimilation enzymes, glutamine synthetase and glutamate dehydrogenase, and the growth inhibition was partially recovered. We argue that NH4+ detoxification is an important trait under high salinity that may differentiate halophytes from glycophytes and we present a possible model for NH4+ detoxification in response to salinity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanism of Salinity Tolerance in Plants)
Open AccessArticle
Physiological and Anatomical Mechanisms in Wheat to Cope with Salt Stress Induced by Seawater
Plants 2020, 9(2), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020237 (registering DOI) - 12 Feb 2020
Abstract
Two pot experiments were conducted in a greenhouse to examine 14C fixation and its distribution in biochemical leaf components, as well as the physiological and anatomical adaptability responses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown with seawater diluted to 0.2, 3.0, 6.0, [...] Read more.
Two pot experiments were conducted in a greenhouse to examine 14C fixation and its distribution in biochemical leaf components, as well as the physiological and anatomical adaptability responses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown with seawater diluted to 0.2, 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 dS m−1. The results showed significant reductions in chlorophyll content, 14C fixation (photosynthesis), plant height, main stem diameter, total leaf area per plant, and total dry weight at 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 dS m−1 seawater salt stress. The 14C loss was very high at 12.0 ds m−1 after 120 h. 14C in lipids (ether extract) showed significant changes at 12.0 dS m−1 at 96 and 120 h. The findings indicated the leaf and stem anatomical feature change of wheat plants resulting from adaptation to salinity stress. A reduction in the anatomical traits of stem and leaf diameter, wall thickness, diameter of the hollow pith cavity, total number of vascular bundles, number of large and small vascular bundles, bundle length and width, thickness of phloem tissue, and diameter of the metaxylem vessel of wheat plants was found. In conclusion, salt stress induces both anatomical and physiological changes in the stem and leaf cells of wheat, as well as the tissues and organs, and these changes in turn make it possible for the plants to adapt successfully to a saline environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanism of Salinity Tolerance in Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop