Special Issue "Plant Growth Regulators in Tree Rooting"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Development and Morphogenesis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Conchi Sánchez
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Physiology, Instituto de Investigaciones Agrobiológicas de Galicia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: adventitious root formation; cell reprogramming; in vitro culture; plant regeneration; epigenetics; maturation; woody species; functional genomics.
Dr. Jesús M. Vielba
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Physiology, Instituto de Investigaciones Agrobiológicas de Galicia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: woody species, in vitro culture, adventitious rooting, molecular biology, biotechnology, transcriptomics, maturation
Dr. Federica Brunoni
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Growth Regulators, Faculty of Science, Palacký University & Institute of Experimental Botany, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Šlechtitelů 27, CZ-78371, Olomouc, Czech Republic
Interests: auxin and cytokinin metabolism and signaling, phytohormone homeostasis, root development, structure-activity relationship of urea derivatives, plant tissue culture, tree physiology, plant evolution

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Trees are long-living organisms with complex life cycles, which must contend with a variable environment over their lifetimes. Therefore, trees are highly adaptable, displaying a wide range of phenotypes as a function of their environments. The complex architecture of the root system is the result of the adaptive growth below ground to the availability of both nutrients and water and to the rapidly changing climate conditions, highlighting the fascinating plasticity of plants. In addition, the root system is fundamentally important because it anchors a plant to its substrate, provides support for extensive growth, serves as a storage organ, perceives stress signals, and can form symbioses with microorganisms and fungi. The importance of the phytohormones in modulating root growth is well established. Acting in minute concentrations, these chemical substances enable the transduction of environmental and internal cues into plastic responses, for instance by regulating the meristematic activity, ranging from cell division, differentiation, and fate acquisition to the root outgrowth in response to physiological and stress conditions. Root development is the result of the interactions of phytohormones with one another and with other endogenous and exogenous factors in complex networks, in which auxin is considered the master regulator. 

Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of the role played by phytohormones in tree rooting in the last decades. Nonetheless, the information is still scattered and difficult to process, and important questions remain open for future investigations. These issues concern the functions of other unexplored plant growth regulators, the phase-specific function of phytohormones during root formation, the relationships between environmental cues, epigenetic modifications, and plant hormone action in trees, among others. Until recently, this information was inaccessible, mainly due to the unavailability of genomic resources and the lack of suitable tools for the quantification of metabolites. The release of draft genomes from conifers and improved genome assembly of several woody species, combined with the development of sensitive methods for the identification and quantification of metabolites and advances in imaging technologies for root phenomic studies, have opened new possibilities for functional studies regarding homeostatic mechanisms in tree rooting. This Special Issue aims to help researchers keep abreast of the most recent developments in elucidating the central role played by plant growth regulators during the formation of adventitious, lateral, and primary roots in tree species. We invite authors to submit original research, review, and opinion papers for this Special Issue, covering this topic for wild and cultivated trees, as well as for other woody and arborescent species.

Dr. Conchi Sánchez
Dr. Jesús M. Vielba
Dr. Federica Brunoni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest trees
  • woody species
  • phytohormones
  • root system
  • vegetative propagation
  • plant hormone profiling
  • genetic diversity
  • epigenetics
  • next-generation sequencing
  • translational research

Published Papers

This special issue is now open for submission.
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