Endomembrane Adaptations under Stress

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 8123

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
GreenUPorto - Sustainable Agrifood Production Research Centre/Inov4Agro – Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto - Rua do Campo Alegre, s/nº, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
Interests: vacuolar sorting; vacuole biogenesis; sorting signals; endomembranes; trafficking; abiotic stress; plant specific insert
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail
Guest Editor
GreenUPorto - Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto Rua do Campo Alegre, s/n, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
Interests: endomembrane trafficking; unconventional pathways; vacuolar sorting; plant-specific insert; plant stress

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As you know, environmental stress conditions, a consequence of climate change, are the main cause for the loss of quality and productivity for crops around the world.

The research effort on plant stress is formidable, and the literature is rich with data. Nonetheless, the connection between membranous structure architecture and stress tolerance is not sufficiently investigated. It is now more and more evident that increased tolerance to stress may derive from membrane reorganization driving important changes in solute homeostasis and water transport efficiency. Likewise, plant responses/adaptations to stress often involve changes in the distribution and sorting of specific molecules, and the activation of specific transport routes is an example of the several unconventional pathways recently described in plant cells.

Although membrane trafficking pathways have been the topic of several studies along the years, and the classical protein transport pathways are now incredibly detailed, there are still many open questions—in particular, the alterations in cell compartments, adaptation of trafficking routes, and other specific adaptations of the cell when exposed adverse, challenging, conditions.

This Special Issue aims to gather state-of-the-art contributions that will advance our knowledge of basic research to understand in more detail the molecular mechanisms beneath plants cell response to adverse conditions.

Dr. Cláudia Sofia Pereira
Dr. Susana S. Pereira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental stress
  • endomembrane remodeling
  • trafficking routes
  • unconventional pathways
  • protein expression
  • plant adaptation
  • plant tolerance

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

16 pages, 2724 KiB  
Article
The Role of Outer Membrane Protein(s) Harboring SLH/OprB-Domains in Extracellular Vesicles’ Production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803
by Delfim Cardoso, Steeve Lima, Jorge Matinha-Cardoso, Paula Tamagnini and Paulo Oliveira
Plants 2021, 10(12), 2757; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10122757 - 14 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3369
Abstract
Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes that contribute to primary production on a global scale. These microorganisms release vesicles to the extracellular environment, spherical nanosized structures, derived essentially from the outer membrane. Even though earlier works in model Gram-negative bacteria have hypothesized [...] Read more.
Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes that contribute to primary production on a global scale. These microorganisms release vesicles to the extracellular environment, spherical nanosized structures, derived essentially from the outer membrane. Even though earlier works in model Gram-negative bacteria have hypothesized that outer membrane stability is crucial in vesicle formation, the mechanisms determining vesicle biogenesis in cyanobacteria remain unknown. Here, we report on the identification of six candidate genes encoding outer membrane proteins harboring SLH/OprB-domains in the genome of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Using a genetics-based approach, one gene was found to encode an essential protein (Slr1841), while the remaining five are not essential for growth under standard conditions. Vesicle production was monitored, and it was found that a mutant in the gene encoding the second most abundant SLH/OprB protein in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 outer membrane (Slr1908) produces more vesicles than any of the other tested strains. Moreover, the Slr1908-protein was also found to be important for iron uptake. Altogether, our results suggest that proteins containing the SLH/OprB-domains may have dual biological role, related to micronutrient uptake and to outer membrane stability, which, together or alone, seem to be involved in cyanobacterial vesicle biogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endomembrane Adaptations under Stress)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

15 pages, 845 KiB  
Review
Coping with Abiotic Stress in Plants—An Endomembrane Trafficking Perspective
by Miguel Sampaio, João Neves, Tatiana Cardoso, José Pissarra, Susana Pereira and Cláudia Pereira
Plants 2022, 11(3), 338; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11030338 - 27 Jan 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4169
Abstract
Plant cells face many changes through their life cycle and develop several mechanisms to cope with adversity. Stress caused by environmental factors is turning out to be more and more relevant as the human population grows and plant cultures start to fail. As [...] Read more.
Plant cells face many changes through their life cycle and develop several mechanisms to cope with adversity. Stress caused by environmental factors is turning out to be more and more relevant as the human population grows and plant cultures start to fail. As eukaryotes, plant cells must coordinate several processes occurring between compartments and combine different pathways for protein transport to several cellular locations. Conventionally, these pathways begin at the ER, or endoplasmic reticulum, move through the Golgi and deliver cargo to the vacuole or to the plasma membrane. However, when under stress, protein trafficking in plants is compromised, usually leading to changes in the endomembrane system that may include protein transport through unconventional routes and alteration of morphology, activity and content of key organelles, as the ER and the vacuole. Such events provide the tools for cells to adapt and overcome the challenges brought on by stress. With this review, we gathered fragmented information on the subject, highlighting how such changes are processed within the endomembrane system and how it responds to an ever-changing environment. Even though the available data on this subject are still sparse, novel information is starting to untangle the complexity and dynamics of protein transport routes and their role in maintaining cell homeostasis under harsh conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endomembrane Adaptations under Stress)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop