Plant Allelopathy: Mechanisms and Applications in Regenerative Agriculture 2nd Edition

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 3183

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Institut für Molekulare Physiologie und Biotechnologie der Pflanzen (IMBIO), Universität Bonn, Karlrobert Kreiten Str. 13, D - 53115 Bonn, Germany
Interests: secondary metabolites; biochemistry; allelopathy; allelochemicals; biodegradation; detoxification; chemical plant microbe interaction; ecological chemistry
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Guest Editor
Department of Sustainable Crop Productions, Section Agronomy and Plant Biotechnologies, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Via Emilia Parmense, 84, 29122 Piacenza, Italy
Interests: no-till; soil quality; soil organic matter; soil phosphorus; soil aggregate stability; soil fertility; soil biology; soil C and N dynamics; subsurface drip irrigation; agriculture sustainable intensification; allelopathic cover crops; alternative weed control; organic farming; developing countries; quinoa cultivation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Allelopathy is defined as an inhibitory or beneficial chemical interaction between plants, plants and microorganisms and between microorganisms themselves. Functional molecules, named allelochemicals, belong to diverse chemical classes of plant and microbial secondary metabolites. Taking a holistic view, it is increasingly recognized that both plant and microbial secondary compounds contribute to allelopathy. Moreover, plants and microorganisms have functions in the detoxification and removal of harmful molecules and also potentiate their toxicity by compound modulation, thus ameliorating or reducing/eliminating allelopathic success. Allelochemicals must be released into the environment, a prerequisite for their uptake by another plant or their entering into contact with microorganisms. In these instances, several mechanisms are possible, both active and passive, encompassing the release of bound allelochemicals from decaying plant material due to microbial activity. Adsorbed at roots surfaces, allelochemicals can influence root-colonizing microorganisms, their interaction with the host plant, and the metabolism, growth and development of the host/target plant. While it has long been known that allelopathy is a strategy for plants to prevail against other plants, chemical interference between plants and microorganisms, as well as between plant- and soil-colonizing microorganisms, has more recently been investigated. These interactions are of crucial importance for the use of allelopathy for weed control in agriculture as green technologies will be favored in future culture systems. They will also launch a discussion about the breeding of novel crop cultivars with a higher allelopathic potential or of those with higher levels of tolerance towards allelopathic compounds. Here, co-evolutionary aspects must be considered since many weeds have already evolved strategies to cope with certain allelochemicals. At times, these strategies are supported by microorganisms, and allelochemicals often act in concert to ensure complete allelochemical degradation. Allelochemicals can severely influence microbial diversity, being an indirect tool to suppress plants by manipulating associated microbial communities/microbiome composition and species richness. This Special Issue will cover recent insights in the areas of plant and plant–microbe allelopathic interactions under laboratory and field conditions; agricultural methods for allelopathic weed control; tolerance strategies of plants and microorganisms against allelochemicals; and in allelochemical degradation, as the latter is important to fulfilling non-residue degradation in order to avoid environmental contaminations. Indeed, the avoidance of environmental damage is a quality criterion of green technologies towards a more sustainable agriculture and remains a key objective of the Farm to Fork and Biodiversity Strategies of the EU Green New Deal Program.

Dr. Margot Schulz
Dr. Vincenzo Tabaglio
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • allelochemical
  • allelopathic interactions
  • alternative weed control
  • microorganisms
  • secondary metabolite
  • regenerative agriculture
  • allelopathic cover crops
  • allelopathy in agriculture
  • allelopathy
  • Farm2Fork strategy

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 3643 KiB  
Article
Allelopathy and Identification of Five Allelochemicals in the Leaves of the Aromatic Medicinal Tree Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa
by Seinn Moh Moh, Shunya Tojo, Toshiaki Teruya and Hisashi Kato-Noguchi
Plants 2024, 13(4), 559; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13040559 - 19 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 596
Abstract
Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa is an economically and therapeutically valuable tree. It is cultivated as a fruit plant in southeast Asian countries. In this research, we investigated the allelopathy and possible allelochemicals in the leaves of A. marmelos. Aqueous methanol extracts of [...] Read more.
Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa is an economically and therapeutically valuable tree. It is cultivated as a fruit plant in southeast Asian countries. In this research, we investigated the allelopathy and possible allelochemicals in the leaves of A. marmelos. Aqueous methanol extracts of A. marmelos exhibited significant inhibitory effects against the growth of Lepidium sativum, Lactuca sativa, Medicago sativa, Echinochloa crusgalli, Lolium multiflorum, and Phleum pratense. Bioassay-directed chromatographic purification of the A. marmelos extracts resulted in identifying five active compounds: umbelliferone (1), trans-ferulic acid (2), (E)-4-hydroxycinnamic acid methyl ester (3), trans-cinnamic acid (4), and methyl (E)-3’-hydroxyl-4’-methoxycinnamate (5). The hypocotyl and root growth of L. sativum were considerably suppressed by these compounds. Methyl (E)-3’-hydroxyl-4’-methoxycinnamate also suppressed the coleoptile and root growth of E. crusgalli. The concentrations of these compounds, causing 50% growth reduction (I50) of L. sativum, were in the range of 74.19–785.4 μM. The findings suggest that these isolated compounds might function in the allelopathy of A. marmelos. Full article
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14 pages, 1314 KiB  
Article
Decoding the Multifaceted Potential of Artemisia monosperma: Comprehensive Insights into Allelopathy, Antimicrobial Activity, and Phytochemical Profile for Sustainable Agriculture
by Mohamed A. El-Sheikh, Anfal Alsharekh, Abdulrahman A. Alatar and Humaira Rizwana
Plants 2023, 12(21), 3695; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12213695 - 26 Oct 2023
Viewed by 808
Abstract
Weeds present a significant hazard to crop production, necessitating the development of effective and sustainable strategies for weed management. Although synthetic herbicides are effective, concerns about their environmental and health impact have been raised. This study investigates the allelopathic potential, antimicrobial activity, and [...] Read more.
Weeds present a significant hazard to crop production, necessitating the development of effective and sustainable strategies for weed management. Although synthetic herbicides are effective, concerns about their environmental and health impact have been raised. This study investigates the allelopathic potential, antimicrobial activity, and phytochemical profile of Artemisia monosperma. Extracts from A. monosperma proficiently impede the growth of Chenopodium murale and Amaranthus viridis, while exhibiting varying effects on crops Solanum lycopersicum and Cucumis sativus. Leaf and seed extracts demonstrate the most significant inhibition of weed growth. Interestingly, the leaf extract at a concentration of 50% inhibited weed growth in pot experiments without affecting crop growth. Moreover, extracts from A. monosperma exhibit noteworthy antifungal and antibacterial activity, with the root extract demonstrating the strongest inhibition. The root extract inhibited the mycelial growth of Colletotrichum musae by 63% as compared to control. The leaf extract exhibited the highest levels of phenolic acids, in particular gallic acid, amounting to 116.30 ppm. This study emphasizes the multifaceted potential of A. monosperma as a sustainable solution for weed management and proposes its use in crop protection. Further investigation of its practical applications and optimization of extraction methods can aid in its integration into contemporary agricultural systems, promoting both crop yield and environmental sustainability. Full article
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23 pages, 5151 KiB  
Article
Implications of Below-Ground Allelopathic Interactions of Camelina sativa and Microorganisms for Phosphate Availability and Habitat Maintenance
by Diana Hofmann, Björn Thiele, Meike Siebers, Mehdi Rahmati, Vadim Schütz, Seungwoo Jeong, Jiaxin Cui, Laurent Bigler, Federico Held, Bei Wu, Nikolina Babic, Filip Kovacic, Joachim Hamacher, Georg Hölzl, Peter Dörmann and Margot Schulz
Plants 2023, 12(15), 2815; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12152815 - 29 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1344
Abstract
Toxic breakdown products of young Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz, glucosinolates can eliminate microorganisms in the soil. Since microorganisms are essential for phosphate cycling, only insensitive microorganisms with phosphate-solubilizing activity can improve C. sativa’s phosphate supply. In this study, 33P-labeled phosphate, inductively coupled [...] Read more.
Toxic breakdown products of young Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz, glucosinolates can eliminate microorganisms in the soil. Since microorganisms are essential for phosphate cycling, only insensitive microorganisms with phosphate-solubilizing activity can improve C. sativa’s phosphate supply. In this study, 33P-labeled phosphate, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and pot experiments unveiled that not only Trichoderma viride and Pseudomonas laurentiana used as phosphate-solubilizing inoculants, but also intrinsic soil microorganisms, including Penicillium aurantiogriseum, and the assemblies of root-colonizing microorganisms solubilized as well phosphate from apatite, trigger off competitive behavior between the organisms. Driving factors in the competitiveness are plant and microbial secondary metabolites, while glucosinolates of Camelina and their breakdown products are regarded as key compounds that inhibit the pathogen P. aurantiogriseum, but also seem to impede root colonization of T. viride. On the other hand, fungal diketopiperazine combined with glucosinolates is fatal to Camelina. The results may contribute to explain the contradictory effects of phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms when used as biofertilizers. Further studies will elucidate impacts of released secondary metabolites on coexisting microorganisms and plants under different environmental conditions. Full article
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