Special Issue "Contemporary Natural Philosophy and Philosophies - Part 3"

A special issue of Philosophies (ISSN 2409-9287).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic
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Guest Editor
1. Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden
2. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, 721 23 Västerås, Sweden
Interests: computing paradigms; computational mechanisms of cognition; philosophy of science; epistemology of science; computing and philosophy; ethics of computing; information ethics; roboethics and engineering ethics; sustainability ethics
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Prof. Dr. Marcin J. Schroeder
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Guest Editor
Global Learning Center, IEHE (Institute for Excellence in Higher Education), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8576, Japan
Interests: philosophy of information and computation; philosophy and history of science and logic; foundations of physics and mathematics; mathematical formalization of scientific theories
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, “Contemporary Natural Philosophy and Philosophies—Part 3”, is the third in a series. The previous two parts resulted in 34 contributions by 41 authors, attracting the interest of researchers from various different research fields, ranging from logic, mathematics, physics, and biology to cognitive sciences and philosophy. Based on that response and success of the previous two Special Issues, which also resulted in two open access books, we have decided to continue exploring Contemporary Natural Philosophy with the help of researchers investigating the variety of domains of knowledge based on “the idea of unity of nature and human as its integral part, from different perspectives of sciences, humanities and liberal arts in their cultural contexts, including technology”—as we put it in the introduction to Part 1. More information is given on the web pages of Parts 1 and 2:

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/philosophies/special_issues/Philosophy_and_Philosophies and

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/philosophies/special_issues/Philosophy_and_Philosophies2

as well in the Editorials

https://www.mdpi.com/2409-9287/3/4/42 and

https://www.mdpi.com/2409-9287/5/3/22

Along with the topics already discussed in the previous two issues, in the present Special Issue, we would particularly like to encourage addressing the human aspect of natural philosophy, extended evolutionary syntheses, and life and capacities of cognition and consciousness, from a naturalist point of view.

We look forward to new contributions that will help to build a new common naturalist human-centered worldview.

Prof. Dr. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic
Prof. Dr. Marcin J. Schroeder
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Philosophies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
A Constructive Treatment to Elemental Life Forms through Mathematical Philosophy
Philosophies 2021, 6(4), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6040084 - 12 Oct 2021
Viewed by 324
Abstract
The quest to understand the natural and the mathematical as well as philosophical principles of dynamics of life forms are ancient in the human history of science. In ancient times, Pythagoras and Plato, and later, Copernicus and Galileo, correctly observed that the grand [...] Read more.
The quest to understand the natural and the mathematical as well as philosophical principles of dynamics of life forms are ancient in the human history of science. In ancient times, Pythagoras and Plato, and later, Copernicus and Galileo, correctly observed that the grand book of nature is written in the language of mathematics. Platonism, Aristotelian logism, neo-realism, monadism of Leibniz, Hegelian idealism and others have made efforts to understand reasons of existence of life forms in nature and the underlying principles through the lenses of philosophy and mathematics. In this paper, an approach is made to treat the similar question about nature and existential life forms in view of mathematical philosophy. The approach follows constructivism to formulate an abstract model to understand existential life forms in nature and its dynamics by selectively combining the elements of various schools of thoughts. The formalisms of predicate logic, probabilistic inference and homotopy theory of algebraic topology are employed to construct a structure in local time-scale horizon and in cosmological time-scale horizon. It aims to resolve the relative and apparent conflicts present in various thoughts in the process, and it has made an effort to establish a logically coherent interpretation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Natural Philosophy and Philosophies - Part 3)
Article
Naturalizing Logic: How Knowledge of Mechanisms Enhances Inductive Inference
Philosophies 2021, 6(2), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6020052 - 21 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 472
Abstract
This paper naturalizes inductive inference by showing how scientific knowledge of real mechanisms provides large benefits to it. I show how knowledge about mechanisms contributes to generalization, inference to the best explanation, causal inference, and reasoning with probabilities. Generalization from some A are [...] Read more.
This paper naturalizes inductive inference by showing how scientific knowledge of real mechanisms provides large benefits to it. I show how knowledge about mechanisms contributes to generalization, inference to the best explanation, causal inference, and reasoning with probabilities. Generalization from some A are B to all A are B is more plausible when a mechanism connects A to B. Inference to the best explanation is strengthened when the explanations are mechanistic and when explanatory hypotheses are themselves mechanistically explained. Causal inference in medical explanation, counterfactual reasoning, and analogy also benefit from mechanistic connections. Mechanisms also help with problems concerning the interpretation, availability, and computation of probabilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Natural Philosophy and Philosophies - Part 3)
Article
The Cognitive Philosophy of Communication
Philosophies 2020, 5(4), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies5040039 - 19 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 882
Abstract
Numerous species use different forms of communication in order to successfully interact in their respective environment. This article seeks to elucidate limitations of the classical conduit metaphor by investigating communication from the perspectives of biology and artificial neural networks. First, communication is a [...] Read more.
Numerous species use different forms of communication in order to successfully interact in their respective environment. This article seeks to elucidate limitations of the classical conduit metaphor by investigating communication from the perspectives of biology and artificial neural networks. First, communication is a biological natural phenomenon, found to be fruitfully grounded in an organism’s embodied structures and memory system, where specific abilities are tied to procedural, semantic, and episodic long-term memory as well as to working memory. Second, the account explicates differences between non-verbal and verbal communication and shows how artificial neural networks can communicate by means of ontologically non-committal modelling. This approach enables new perspectives of communication to emerge regarding both sender and receiver. It is further shown that communication features gradient properties that are plausibly divided into a reflexive and a reflective form, parallel to knowledge and reflection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Natural Philosophy and Philosophies - Part 3)
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