Special Issue "Pharmacist–Physician Collaborative Research"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Donald G. Klepser

RUPRI Center for Rural Health Policy Analysis, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Website | E-Mail
Interests: point-of-care testing; immunizations; pharmacy-based services; phramacoeconomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The role of the pharmacist continues to grow and move towards a greater involvement in direct patient care. In many cases, that involvement is as part of a collaborative care team. Pharmacist–physician collaborations have been shown to improve patient outcomes, increase access to care, increase efficiency, and patient satisfaction. Despite these benefits, challenges to successful collaborations exist and they still represent an exception to rather than the usual care.

We invite you to share your approaches and successes in developing and implementing innovative pharmacist–physician collaborations. We also welcome research describing the challenges and barriers to wider adoption of successful collaborations. We hope this Special Issue will inspire other pharmacists and researchers to develop new innovative collaborations, and adopt new approaches.

Dr. Donald G. Klepser
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Collaborative practice agreement
  • Interprofessional
  • Pharmacy-based
  • Disease management

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Consultant Pharmacist–Provider Collaboration in U.S. Assisted Living Facilities: A Pilot Study
Received: 28 December 2018 / Revised: 21 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
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Abstract
The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the impact of pharmacist-provided recommendations to general practitioners (GPs) of patients living in assisted living facilities (ALFs). A secondary objective of this study was to explore prescriber and ALF staff perceptions. This was a [...] Read more.
The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the impact of pharmacist-provided recommendations to general practitioners (GPs) of patients living in assisted living facilities (ALFs). A secondary objective of this study was to explore prescriber and ALF staff perceptions. This was a mixed-method, quasi experimental 1-group pre/post-test study with an explanatory qualitative arm using in-depth semi-structured interviews at five regional ALFs and one independent community pharmacy in East Tennessee. Residents older than 65 years of age, with confirmed diagnosis of Type II diabetes in the pharmacy’s medical record, taking anti-diabetic medication for at least 14 days and resident of affiliated ALF for at least past 30 days were enrolled. Phase 1 demonstrated a 35.1% (13/37 recommendations) acceptance rate of pharmacist recommendations. Phase 2 demonstrated a similar 31.3% acceptance rate of pharmacist recommendations (5/16 recommendations). The mean pre–post difference in average 30-day FBG was greater in the accepted group than the rejected recommendation group (−9.1 vs. −2.3 mg/dL). Pharmacist–GP collaboration in the ALF population was feasible and may improve the quality of patient care of these residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist–Physician Collaborative Research)
Open AccessArticle
Pharmacists Becoming Physicians: For Better or Worse?
Received: 12 June 2018 / Revised: 19 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 23 July 2018
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Abstract
Physicians and pharmacists nowadays are often described as adversaries rather than members of the same team. Some pharmacists apply to medical school later in their careers, and experience obstacles during the transition process. This article details interviews with two physician–pharmacists, who each have [...] Read more.
Physicians and pharmacists nowadays are often described as adversaries rather than members of the same team. Some pharmacists apply to medical school later in their careers, and experience obstacles during the transition process. This article details interviews with two physician–pharmacists, who each have a past pharmacist license and current physician license. The respondents described the limitations of pharmacists’ scope of practice as their main reasons to pursue a medical career. However, the respondents enjoy applying their pharmacy knowledge and experience to improve their medical practice. They do not feel pharmacy seniors and medical recruiters are supportive towards their chase for medical careers. The respondents noted the importance of peer-reviewed articles to promote pharmacist involvement in patient care and collaboration between physicians and pharmacists. Conflicts between physicians and pharmacists tend to happen because of their different focuses on patient care. The respondents do not see themselves having an edge over other medical school applicants, and noted that recruiters could negatively view their pharmacy experience. The respondents believe that physician–pharmacists are catalysts to foster collaboration between physicians and pharmacists, because they clearly understand the role of each profession. Nevertheless, the respondents feel that physicians and pharmacists are generally lukewarm towards pharmacists transitioning into physicians. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist–Physician Collaborative Research)

Other

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Open AccessLetter
Pharmacy Technician-Administered Vaccines: On Perceptions and Practice Reality
Pharmacy 2018, 6(4), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6040124
Received: 16 November 2018 / Revised: 23 November 2018 / Accepted: 26 November 2018 / Published: 29 November 2018
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Abstract
Doucette and Schommer recently surveyed U.S. community pharmacy technicians on their willingness to perform tasks including the administration of vaccines. They found that 47.1% of technicians reported they were “unwilling” to administer a vaccine, although this finding must be placed into proper context. [...] Read more.
Doucette and Schommer recently surveyed U.S. community pharmacy technicians on their willingness to perform tasks including the administration of vaccines. They found that 47.1% of technicians reported they were “unwilling” to administer a vaccine, although this finding must be placed into proper context. The first nationwide survey of U.S. pharmacist perceptions on immunizations in 1998 revealed only 2.2% of pharmacist respondents had administered adult vaccines and only 0.9% had administered childhood vaccines. They also found pharmacists to be “slightly negative on administering immunizations” with many perceived barriers. Nonetheless, pharmacist-provided immunizations have been an unqualified public health success. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) predicts intention from attitude and perceived behavioral control, among other factors. Given low involvement, exposure, and perceived behavioral control to administer vaccinations, technicians’ attitudes or willingness to participate from the Doucette and Shommer study can be regarded as quite positive. Given the results of a successful pilot project in Idaho and that subjective norms and perceived behavioral control will likely shift upward, one can only expect technicians’ willingness to participate in vaccinations to become more favorable and ultimately become a success. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist–Physician Collaborative Research)
Open AccessCommentary
Is Research Experience Detrimental to a Clinical Pharmacist’s Career?
Pharmacy 2018, 6(4), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6040105
Received: 2 September 2018 / Revised: 21 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 27 September 2018
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Abstract
A recent article in the Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy discussed pharmacists’ perception of clinical research. The article illustrated that pharmacists lack the time, resources, and skills to conduct research. In the current paper, two ex-pharmacists, who now work as physicians, commented on [...] Read more.
A recent article in the Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy discussed pharmacists’ perception of clinical research. The article illustrated that pharmacists lack the time, resources, and skills to conduct research. In the current paper, two ex-pharmacists, who now work as physicians, commented on the prejudice towards pharmacy researchers. Pharmacy researchers face obstacles such as being mislabeled as “non-clinical” and lacking opportunities to be involved in high-impact publications. The current paper discussed ways to improve pharmacy research, including collaboration with well-established researchers, putting less emphasis on the “clinical” pharmacist title, and changing the pharmacy culture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist–Physician Collaborative Research)
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