Special Issue "Symbiotic Materials for Pharmaceutics"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Biopharmaceutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 694

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Asako Yamayoshi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki-shi, Nagasaki 852-8521, Japan
Interests: nucleic acid drugs; chemistry of functional molecules; exosome; material symbiosis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Mitsuhiro Ebara
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center for Functional Materials (RCFM), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044, Japan
Interests: smart polymers; anti-inflammation; apoptosis; material symbiosis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The human body encompasses amazing symbiotic relationships with several organisms, the relationship between a mother and her unborn baby being one such remarkable interaction. The mother does not reject her fetus, even though the fetus is a completely separate organism. In contrast, although research on many different types of functional molecules has been realized, including biological drugs and biocompatible materials, the mechanisms of the symbiosis between humans and non-self molecules/materials is less understood; even highly optimized advanced drugs exhibit immunogenicity in some cases, which has become a major challenge for clinical applications.

In this Special Issue, we refer to the symbiosis between human living cells and materials as “material symbiosis”. We aim to elucidate relationships between biomolecules and materials in terms of biophysical chemistry and review the development of biomaterials that exhibit desired relationships with biomolecules or living cells. We hope this Special Issue will act as an effective design guideline for materials and drugs to avoid conventional side effects, such as immunogenicity and induction of malignancy. To further build upon the collective knowledge in this area, we are inviting reviews and research articles from clinical, academic, and industry settings on “Symbiotic Materials for Pharmaceutics”.

Prof. Dr. Asako Yamayoshi
Prof. Dr. Mitsuhiro Ebara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceutics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • material symbiosis
  • biomaterials
  • biological drugs
  • immunogenicity
  • drug delivery system

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Flavonoids Enhance Lipofection Efficiency and Ameliorate Cytotoxicity in Colon26 and HepG2 Cells via Oxidative Stress Regulation
Pharmaceutics 2022, 14(6), 1203; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics14061203 - 05 Jun 2022
Viewed by 441
Abstract
The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect cationic liposome-mediated transfection. In this study, we focused on a specific class of antioxidants, flavonoids, to investigate the transfection efficiency using cationic liposome/plasmid DNA complexes (lipoplexes) in 2D and 3D cultures of Colon26 and [...] Read more.
The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect cationic liposome-mediated transfection. In this study, we focused on a specific class of antioxidants, flavonoids, to investigate the transfection efficiency using cationic liposome/plasmid DNA complexes (lipoplexes) in 2D and 3D cultures of Colon26 and HepG2 cells, respectively. All tested flavonoids enhanced the transfection efficiency in 2D Colon26 and HepG2 cells. Among the tested flavonoids, 25 µM quercetin showed the highest promotion effect of 8.4- and 7.6-folds in 2D Colon26 and HepG2 cells, respectively. Transfection was also performed in 3D cultures of Colon26 and HepG2 cells using lipoplexes with quercetin. Quercetin (12.5 µM) showed the highest transfection efficiency at all transfection timings in 3D Colon26 and HepG2 cells with increased cell viability. Flow cytometry revealed that quercetin treatment reduced the population of gene expression-negative cells with high ROS levels and increased the number of gene expression-positive cells with low ROS levels in HepG2 cells. Information from this study can be valuable to develop strategies to promote transfection efficiency and attenuate cytotoxicity using lipoplexes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Symbiotic Materials for Pharmaceutics)
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