Polymer-Based Wound Dressings

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2023) | Viewed by 8041

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Fort Hare, Alice Campus, Alice 5700, Eastern Cape, South Africa
Interests: polymer-based drug delivery systems; wound dressings; organic synthesis; antimalarials; anticancer; polymer–drug conjugates
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6001, South Africa
Interests: polymers; nanoparticles; wound dressings; skin regeneration; nanofibers; membranes; hydrogels; essential oils; anticancer drugs; antimalarials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The delayed process of wound healing and skin regeneration is a major challenge in the treatment of injuries. Some known factors are responsible for delayed wound healing, such as microbial infections, underlying and immunocompromised conditions (e.g., diabetes mellitus, cancer, HIV, etc.), malnutrition, application of inappropriate wound dressings, etc. Most commercially available wound dressings also suffer from limitations such as poor antibacterial and antioxidant activity, weak mechanical performance, and an inability to provide suitable moisture for wound healing, thereby limiting their application in wound healing. A series of preclinical studies have shown that wound dressings prepared from biopolymers promote wound healing and skin regeneration. However, biopolymers exhibit poor mechanical properties and are usually combined with synthetic polymers and other classes of material to improve their mechanical properties. To further improve the biological properties of polymer-based wound dressings, these dressings are loaded with various bioactive agents, resulting in accelerated wound healing and skin regeneration. This Special Issue aims to highlight the efficacy of polymer-based wound dressings from the reported preclinical and clinical studies.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: wound dressings, antibacterial activity, anti-inflammatory efficacy, wound healing, skin regeneration, and regenerative medicine.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Blessing Atim Aderibigbe
Dr. Sibusiso Alven
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceutics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polymers
  • wound dressings
  • chronic wounds
  • wound repair
  • skin regeneration
  • antibacterial activity
  • three-dimensional scaffolds
  • nanofibers
  • hydrogels
  • bioactive agents
  • films/membranes
  • microneedle array patches

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

17 pages, 4393 KiB  
Article
The Formulation and Characterization of Wound Dressing Releasing S-Nitrosoglutathione from Polyvinyl Alcohol/Borax Reinforced Carboxymethyl Chitosan Self-Healing Hydrogel
by Juliana Palungan, Widya Luthfiyah, Apon Zaenal Mustopa, Maritsa Nurfatwa, Latifah Rahman, Risfah Yulianty, Nasrul Wathoni, Jin-Wook Yoo and Nurhasni Hasan
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(3), 344; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16030344 - 29 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1433
Abstract
Self-healing hydrogels often lack mechanical properties, limiting their wound-dressing applications. This study introduced S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) to self-healing hydrogel-based wound dressings. Self-healing hydrogel mechanical properties were improved via polymer blends. Applying this hydrogel to the wound site allows it to self-heal and reattach after [...] Read more.
Self-healing hydrogels often lack mechanical properties, limiting their wound-dressing applications. This study introduced S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) to self-healing hydrogel-based wound dressings. Self-healing hydrogel mechanical properties were improved via polymer blends. Applying this hydrogel to the wound site allows it to self-heal and reattach after mechanical damage. This work evaluated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based self-healing hydrogels with borax as a crosslinking agent and carboxymethyl chitosan as a mechanical property enhancer. Three formulations (F1, F4, and F7) developed self-healing hydrogels. These formulations had borax concentrations of 0.8%, 1.2%, and 1.6%. An FTIR study shows that borate ester crosslinking and hydrogen bonding between polymers generate a self-healing hydrogel. F4 has a highly uniform and regular pore structure, as shown by the scanning electron microscope image. F1 exhibited faster self-healing, taking 13.95 ± 1.45 min compared to other formulations. All preparations had pH values close to neutrality, making them suitable wound dressings. Formula F7 has a high drug content (97.34 ± 1.21%). Good mechanical qualities included high tensile stress–strain intensity and Young’s modulus. After 28 h of storage at −20 °C, 5 °C, and 25 °C, the self-healing hydrogel’s drug content dropped significantly. The Korsmeyer–Peppas release model showed that the release profile of GSNO followed Fickian diffusion. Thus, varying the concentration of crosslinking agent and adding a polymer affects self-healing hydrogels’ physicochemical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Wound Dressings)
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 9454 KiB  
Article
3D-Printed Alginate/Pectin-Based Patches Loaded with Olive Leaf Extracts for Wound Healing Applications: Development, Characterization and In Vitro Evaluation of Biological Properties
by Francesco Patitucci, Marisa Francesca Motta, Marco Dattilo, Rocco Malivindi, Adele Elisabetta Leonetti, Giuseppe Pezzi, Sabrina Prete, Olga Mileti, Domenico Gabriele, Ortensia Ilaria Parisi and Francesco Puoci
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(1), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16010099 - 11 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1456
Abstract
Traditional wound dressings may lack suitability for diverse wound types and individual patient requirements. In this context, this study aimed to innovate wound care by developing a 3D-printed patch using alginate and pectin and incorporating Olive Leaf Extract (OLE) as an active ingredient. [...] Read more.
Traditional wound dressings may lack suitability for diverse wound types and individual patient requirements. In this context, this study aimed to innovate wound care by developing a 3D-printed patch using alginate and pectin and incorporating Olive Leaf Extract (OLE) as an active ingredient. Different polymer-to-plasticizer ratios were systematically examined to formulate a printable ink with optimal viscosity. The resultant film, enriched with OLE, exhibited a substantial polyphenolic content of 13.15 ± 0.41 mg CAE/g, showcasing significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Notably, the film demonstrated potent scavenging abilities against DPPH, ABTS, and NO radicals, with IC50 values of 0.66 ± 0.07, 0.47 ± 0.04, and 2.02 ± 0.14 mg/mL, respectively. In vitro release and diffusion studies were carried out and the release profiles revealed an almost complete release of polyphenols from the patch within 48 h. Additionally, the fabricated film exhibited the capacity to enhance cell motility and accelerate wound healing, evidenced by increased collagen I expression in BJ fibroblast cells. Structural assessments affirmed the ability of the patch to absorb exudates and maintain the optimal moisture balance, while biocompatibility studies underscored its suitability for biomedical applications. These compelling findings endorse the potential application of the developed film in advanced wound care, with the prospect of tailoring patches to individual patient needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Wound Dressings)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

19 pages, 4196 KiB  
Article
Healing Effect of a Nano-Functionalized Medical-Grade Honey for the Treatment of Infected Wounds
by Jessica Salvo, Cristian Sandoval, Carolina Schencke, Francisca Acevedo and Mariano del Sol
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(9), 2187; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15092187 - 24 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1484
Abstract
Based on the qualities of Ulmo honey (Eucryphia cordifolia), a medical-grade honey (Ulmoplus®) has been developed. Relevant to this, the use of copper represents an emerging therapy for the treatment of wounds. Therefore, the aim of this study was [...] Read more.
Based on the qualities of Ulmo honey (Eucryphia cordifolia), a medical-grade honey (Ulmoplus®) has been developed. Relevant to this, the use of copper represents an emerging therapy for the treatment of wounds. Therefore, the aim of this study was to see how this medical-grade honey with copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) helped to heal infected or non-infected wounds. Twenty-four guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) were divided into four groups for phase 1 (without and with infection, U + F1 and U + F2), and two groups for phase 2 (selected formulation, without and with infection, U + F2NI and U + F2I). Bacteriological and histopathological studies, collagen fibers content evaluation, and stereological analysis were performed. The selected formulation displayed the same antibacterial potency as Ulmoplus®, indicating that this medical-grade honey by itself can be used as an antibacterial agent. However, the evaluation of collagen content demonstrated a significant increase in fibroblast and type III collagen fibers for infected and uninfected groups, which correlated with the histopathological study. Therefore, it is correct to affirm that adding CuNPs to Ulmoplus® improved the maturation of collagen fibers. Finally, polymorphonuclear cells presented similar values between experimental groups, which would indicate that the formulation under study was able to regulate the inflammatory process despite their infectious condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Wound Dressings)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

29 pages, 2062 KiB  
Review
Chitosan-Based Scaffolds Incorporated with Silver Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Infected Wounds
by Sibusiso Alven and Blessing Atim Aderibigbe
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(3), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16030327 - 26 Feb 2024
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1650
Abstract
Bacterial infections are major problems in wound care due to their impact on the retarded process of wound healing, leading to chronic wounds. Most of the presently utilized wound dressing products exhibit poor antimicrobial properties. Wound dressings formulated from chitosan have been reported [...] Read more.
Bacterial infections are major problems in wound care due to their impact on the retarded process of wound healing, leading to chronic wounds. Most of the presently utilized wound dressing products exhibit poor antimicrobial properties. Wound dressings formulated from chitosan have been reported to be effective for treating infected wounds, resulting from the antibacterial properties of chitosan. The antibacterial properties of chitosan-based wound dressings can be further enhanced by incorporating metallic nanoparticles into them, such as silver, zinc, titanium, etc. The incorporation of silver nanoparticles into chitosan-based wound dressings has been widely explored in the design of antimicrobial wound dressings. The incorporation of silver nanoparticles into chitosan-based wound dressings promotes accelerated wound-healing processes due to enhanced antimicrobial activity. The accelerated wound healing by these metal-based nanoparticles is via the regulation of re-epithelialization and inflammation without affecting the viability of normal cells. However, there have been few reports that evaluate these wound dressings in infectious animal models to prove their efficacy. The in vivo toxicity of silver nanoparticles still needs to be addressed, revealing the need for further preclinical and clinical trials. The fabrication of wound dressings incorporated with silver nanoparticles has not been fully explored, especially for wounds requiring immediate treatment. The possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and chitosan scaffolds that result in synergistic effects still need to be understood and studied. This review provides a comprehensive report on the preclinical outcomes of chitosan wound dressing materials loaded with silver nanoparticles for managing infected wounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Wound Dressings)
Show Figures

Figure 1

27 pages, 5569 KiB  
Review
Polymer-Based Functional Materials Loaded with Metal-Based Nanoparticles as Potential Scaffolds for the Management of Infected Wounds
by Xhamla Nqoro and Raymond Taziwa
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(2), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16020155 - 23 Jan 2024
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1389
Abstract
Wound infection due to bacterial invasion at the wound site is one of the primary challenges associated with delayed wound healing. Microorganisms tend to form biofilms that protect them from harm, leading to their multidrug resistance. The alarming increase in antibiotic resistance poses [...] Read more.
Wound infection due to bacterial invasion at the wound site is one of the primary challenges associated with delayed wound healing. Microorganisms tend to form biofilms that protect them from harm, leading to their multidrug resistance. The alarming increase in antibiotic resistance poses a threat to wound healing. Hence, the urgent need for novel wound dressing materials capable of managing bacterial infection is crucial for expediting wound recovery. There is considerable interest in polymeric wound dressings embedded with bioactive substances, such as metal-based nanoparticles, as potential solutions for treating microbially infected wounds. Metal-based nanoparticles have been widely used for the management of infected wounds due to their broad antimicrobial efficacy. This review focuses on polymer-based and bioactive wound dressings loaded with metal-based nanoparticles like silver, gold, magnesium oxide, or zinc oxide. When compared, zinc oxide-loaded dressings exhibited higher antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strains and silver nanoparticle-loaded dressings against gram-negative strains. However, wound dressings infused with both nanoparticles displayed a synergistic effect against both strains of bacteria. Furthermore, these dressings displayed antibiofilm activity and the generation of reactive oxygen species while accelerating wound closure both in vitro and in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Wound Dressings)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop