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Special Issue "New Drugs in Hematology"

A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Luciano J. Costa

Department of Medicine and UAB-CCC, Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy Program, North Pavilion - NP 2554, 1802 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: strategies for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders; toxicity of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; population outcomes of hematologic malignancies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last two decades we have witnessed a complete transformation in how we approach blood cancers. A deeper understanding of the biology of specific hematologic malignancies has exposed numerous new therapeutic targets that were quickly followed by a plethora of novel therapeutic agents. The availability of novel drugs not only continues to improve patient outcomes but also generate numerous clinical questions. How to best combine or sequence new therapeutic agents? How to balance toxicity with the need for prolonged therapy? How cancer cells escape pharmacological suppression of a presumed vital pathway? How to make therapeutic innovations affordable to most patients? How to ensure barriers for clinical trial participation are removed so patients have early access to disease modifying agents while answering the relevant clinic questions? In this Special Issue of Pharmaceuticals experts discuss recent innovations in their fields and lay out the remaining key questions for the near future.

Dr. Luciano J. Costa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceuticals is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • multiple myeloma
  • stem cell transplantation
  • non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Hodgkin lymphoma
  • population outcomes
  • clinical trials
  • hematopoietic cells mobilization

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Novel Proteasome Inhibitors and Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors: Progress in Myeloma Therapeutics
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10020040
Received: 15 February 2017 / Revised: 28 March 2017 / Accepted: 4 April 2017 / Published: 11 April 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2344 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The unfolded protein response is responsible for the detection of misfolded proteins and the coordination of their disposal and is necessary to maintain the cellular homoeostasis. Multiple myeloma cells secrete large amounts of immunoglobulins, proteins that need to be correctly folded by the
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The unfolded protein response is responsible for the detection of misfolded proteins and the coordination of their disposal and is necessary to maintain the cellular homoeostasis. Multiple myeloma cells secrete large amounts of immunoglobulins, proteins that need to be correctly folded by the chaperone system. If this process fails, the misfolded proteins have to be eliminated by the two main garbage-disposal systems of the cell: proteasome and aggresome. The blockade of either of these systems will result in accumulation of immunoglobulins and other toxic proteins in the cytoplasm and cell death. The simultaneous inhibition of the proteasome, by proteasome inhibitors (PIs) and the aggresome, by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) results in a synergistic increase in cytotoxicity in myeloma cell lines. This review provides an overview of mechanisms of action of second-generation PIs and HDACi in multiple myeloma (MM), the clinical results currently observed with these agents and assesses the potential therapeutic impact of the different agents in the two classes. The second-generation PIs offer benefits in terms of increased efficacy, reduced neurotoxicity as off-target effect and may overcome resistance to bortezomib because of their different chemical structure, mechanism of action and biological properties. HDACi with anti-myeloma activity in clinical development discussed in this review include vorinostat, panobinostat and selective HDAC6 inhibitor, ricolinostat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Drugs in Hematology)
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Open AccessReview Targeted Drugs as Maintenance Therapy after Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Mantle Cell Lymphoma
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10010028
Received: 27 January 2017 / Revised: 6 March 2017 / Accepted: 8 March 2017 / Published: 10 March 2017
PDF Full-text (233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The treatment landscape for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is rapidly evolving toward the incorporation of novel and biologically targeted pharmaceuticals with improved disease activity and gentler toxicity profiles compared with conventional chemotherapeutics. Upfront intensive treatment of MCL includes autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT)
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The treatment landscape for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is rapidly evolving toward the incorporation of novel and biologically targeted pharmaceuticals with improved disease activity and gentler toxicity profiles compared with conventional chemotherapeutics. Upfront intensive treatment of MCL includes autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) consolidation aimed at deepening and lengthening disease remission, but subsequent relapse occurs. Maintenance therapy after autologous SCT in patients with MCL in remission features lower-intensity treatments given over extended periods to improve disease outcomes. Targeted drugs are a natural fit for this space, and are the focus of considerable clinical investigation. This review summarizes recent advances in the field and their potential impact on treatment practices for MCL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Drugs in Hematology)
Open AccessReview Targeted Therapies for the Treatment of Pediatric Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas: Present and Future
Pharmaceuticals 2016, 9(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph9020028
Received: 29 March 2016 / Revised: 3 May 2016 / Accepted: 12 May 2016 / Published: 19 May 2016
PDF Full-text (226 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pediatric Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (NHL) are a diverse group of malignancies and as such treatment can vary based on the different biological characteristics of each malignancy. Significant advancements are being made in the treatment and outcomes of this group of malignancies. This is in
[...] Read more.
Pediatric Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (NHL) are a diverse group of malignancies and as such treatment can vary based on the different biological characteristics of each malignancy. Significant advancements are being made in the treatment and outcomes of this group of malignancies. This is in large part due to novel targeted drug therapies that are being used in combination with traditional chemotherapy. Here, we discuss several new lines of therapy that are being developed or are in current use for pediatric patients with NHL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Drugs in Hematology)
Open AccessReview Novel Targeted Agents in Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Therapy
Pharmaceuticals 2015, 8(3), 607-636; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph8030607
Received: 14 August 2015 / Revised: 2 September 2015 / Accepted: 7 September 2015 / Published: 17 September 2015
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (407 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There has been a recent emergence of novel targeted agents for treatment of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In particular, antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates directed against surface antigens, agents that block immune checkpoint pathways, and small molecule inhibitors directed against cell signaling pathways have
[...] Read more.
There has been a recent emergence of novel targeted agents for treatment of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In particular, antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates directed against surface antigens, agents that block immune checkpoint pathways, and small molecule inhibitors directed against cell signaling pathways have shown significant promise in patients with relapsed and refractory disease and in the frontline setting. With the development of these new therapies, cytotoxic chemotherapy may be avoided entirely in some clinical settings. This review will present the latest information on these novel treatments in Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma and will discuss both recently approved agents as well as drugs currently being studied in clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Drugs in Hematology)
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