Special Issue "Aging and Drug Discovery"

A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Stuart Maudsley
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Receptor Biology Lab, Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen, Belgium
Interests: aging; receptor; G protein-coupled receptor; pharmacology; bioinformatics; proteomics; interactomics; therapeutic; translational

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Across the world, premature mortality rates continue to drop, and while this trend should be welcomed, it also inculcates further healthcare issues, e.g., the global emergence of an aged population. Increasing age brings with it the increased socioeconomic burden of age-related diseases, e.g., cancer, cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and dementia. This interesting scenario therefore presents several novel problems for the future of drug design and development, i.e., do we develop i) agents that can forestall the aging process, ii) therapies that are capable of clearing away aged/diseased cells, or iii) precision agents capable of controlling the symptoms of these diseases in an elderly individual? In the future, it is likely that all of these potential strategies will be exploited to reduce the prevalence of age-related disease. In this Special Issue of Pharmaceuticals, we will explore the most exciting and innovative advances in molecular gerontology and pharmacology.

Prof. Stuart Maudsley
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aging
  • gerontology
  • pharmacology
  • senescence
  • resilience
  • therapeutic

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Review
Clinical Evidence for Targeting NAD Therapeutically
Pharmaceuticals 2020, 13(9), 247; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph13090247 - 15 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2618
Abstract
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) pharmacology is a promising class of treatments for age-related conditions that are likely to have a favorable side effect profile for human use, given the widespread use of the NAD precursor vitamin B3 supplements. However, despite several decades of [...] Read more.
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) pharmacology is a promising class of treatments for age-related conditions that are likely to have a favorable side effect profile for human use, given the widespread use of the NAD precursor vitamin B3 supplements. However, despite several decades of active investigation and numerous possible biochemical mechanisms of action suggested, only a small number of randomized and adequately powered clinical trials of NAD upregulation as a therapeutic strategy have taken place. We conducted a systematic review of the literature, following the PRISMA guidelines, in an attempt to determine whether or not the human clinical trials performed to date support the potential benefits of NAD supplementation in a range of skin, metabolic and age-related conditions. In addition, we sought medical indications that have yielded the most promising results in the limited studies to date. We conclude that promising, yet still speculative, results have been reported for the treatment of psoriasis and enhancement of skeletal muscle activity. However, further trials are required to determine the optimal method of raising NAD levels, identifying the target conditions, and comparisons to the present standard of care for these conditions. Lastly, pharmacological methods that increase NAD levels should also be directly compared to physiological means of raising NAD levels, such as exercise programs and dietary interventions that are tailored to older individuals, and which may be more effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aging and Drug Discovery)
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Review
Phenotypic Screening in C. elegans as a Tool for the Discovery of New Geroprotective Drugs
Pharmaceuticals 2020, 13(8), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph13080164 - 25 Jul 2020
Viewed by 1500
Abstract
Population aging is one of the largest challenges of the 21st century. As more people live to advanced ages, the prevalence of age-related diseases and disabilities will increase placing an ever larger burden on our healthcare system. A potential solution to this conundrum [...] Read more.
Population aging is one of the largest challenges of the 21st century. As more people live to advanced ages, the prevalence of age-related diseases and disabilities will increase placing an ever larger burden on our healthcare system. A potential solution to this conundrum is to develop treatments that prevent, delay or reduce the severity of age-related diseases by decreasing the rate of the aging process. This ambition has been accomplished in model organisms through dietary, genetic and pharmacological interventions. The pharmacological approaches hold the greatest opportunity for successful translation to the clinic. The discovery of such pharmacological interventions in aging requires high-throughput screening strategies. However, the majority of screens performed for geroprotective drugs in C. elegans so far are rather low throughput. Therefore, the development of high-throughput screening strategies is of utmost importance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aging and Drug Discovery)
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