New Trends in Arthroplasty

A special issue of Osteology (ISSN 2673-4036).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 June 2024 | Viewed by 8004

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Centre Maribor, Ljubljanska ulica 5, 2000 Maribor, Slovenia
Interests: total hip arthroplasty; total knee arthroplasty; revision arthroplasty; biomaterials; osteoporosis; degenerative lumbar spine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, the volume of primary total hip and knee arthroplasty procedures has risen at almost exponential rates. Due to the great, potentially long-lasting success probabilities of these procedures, the proven technology was successfully transferred to other major joints, especially the shoulder and the ankle. Consequently, total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is currently one of the most commonly performed elective surgical procedures worldwide. Close collaborations between surgeons and the industry have resulted in many new ideas and solutions for increased performance, durability, and sustainability of the implants. New surgical approaches, pain management, and rehabilitation techniques have been developed to perform these complex surgeries on an outpatient basis. However, the safety of patients in this ever-changing process of TJA should never be neglected. With this perspective in focus, the aim of this Special Issue on osteology is to predict the future of arthroplasty.

Prof. Dr. Samo Karel Fokter
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Osteology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • arthroplasty
  • joints
  • hip/knee/shoulder/ankle
  • total hip/knee arthroplasty
  • patient safety
  • robotic surgery
  • patient-specific implants
  • complications
  • implant revision
  • implant survival
  • implant fracture
  • anterior approach
  • minimal invasive surgery
  • fast-track rehabilitation
  • pain management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 569 KiB  
Article
Pre-Operative Adiposity and Synovial Fluid Inflammatory Biomarkers Provide a Predictive Model for Post-Operative Outcomes Following Total Joint Replacement Surgery in Osteoarthritis Patients
by Dominika E. Nanus, Edward T. Davis and Simon W. Jones
Osteology 2024, 4(2), 53-63; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology4020005 - 22 Apr 2024
Viewed by 492
Abstract
A proportion of osteoarthritis (OA) patients are unsatisfied with post-operative outcomes following total joint replacement surgery (TJR), with insufficient pain relief or poor functional improvement. Predicting those who will have poor outcomes would be beneficial for patients and clinicians. The aim of this [...] Read more.
A proportion of osteoarthritis (OA) patients are unsatisfied with post-operative outcomes following total joint replacement surgery (TJR), with insufficient pain relief or poor functional improvement. Predicting those who will have poor outcomes would be beneficial for patients and clinicians. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between baseline anthropometric data and the concentration of pre-operative serum and peri-operative synovial fluid (SF) cytokines and 7-month post-operative outcomes in a cohort of knee and hip OA patients. 160 OA patients were recruited who were scheduled for TJR. The concentration of 24 cytokines was measured in blood and SF by multiplex assay. EQ5D index health status was assessed pre-operatively and at 7 months post-operatively. 13% of patients were identified as non-responders based on EQ5D index. Compared to responders, non-responders were of higher body mass index (BMI), had greater waist and hip circumference, and had higher levels of SF leptin but lower levels of SF resistin (p < 0.05). Linear regression analysis found a significant but weak relationship between pre-operative body weight and post-operative response (ΔEQ5D index; r = 0.222, p = 0.049). The combination of body weight with SF amphiregulin and SF IL-6 provided an improved predictive model of post-operative response (r = 0.470, p = 0.035). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Arthroplasty)
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14 pages, 3137 KiB  
Article
Managing Native Hip Protrusio: Simplified Classification and Surgical Recommendations
by Lidia Ani, Zachary Radford and Lee E. Rubin
Osteology 2023, 3(1), 33-46; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology3010005 - 13 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 6545
Abstract
Protrusio acetabuli is a unique osteological condition that has been long described in the literature and is known to potentially increase both the surgical complexity and the risk of complications when performing total hip arthroplasty. Although grading systems for native hip protrusio have [...] Read more.
Protrusio acetabuli is a unique osteological condition that has been long described in the literature and is known to potentially increase both the surgical complexity and the risk of complications when performing total hip arthroplasty. Although grading systems for native hip protrusio have been described in the past, there has not yet been a widely adopted classification system that categorizes the condition into separate classes in order to guide management. We propose a novel classification system with the goal of simplifying and standardizing the management of protrusio acetabuli in the context of modern total hip arthroplasty. This classification system describes protrusio based on the relationship of the femoral head to the ilioischial and iliopectineal lines, allowing for a more reproducible and consistent categorization of pathology. We also discuss general recommendations and technical pearls for total hip arthroplasty in the protrusio patient population, including the use of strategic soft tissue releases, fluoroscopy, navigation, bone graft, and augments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Arthroplasty)
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