Current Trends in Sports Medicine Based on Orthopedics and Osteology

A special issue of Osteology (ISSN 2673-4036).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 6036

Special Issue Editor

Tahoe Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, University of Nevada Reno, South Lake Tahoe, Reno, NV 96150, USA
Interests: foot and ankle surgery; sports medicine; musculoskeletal trauma; cartilage restoraton
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of sports medicine is growing at a rate that outpaces all other sub-specialties in orthopedics. The journal Osteology would like to take this opportunity to invite young surgeons and researchers to share their knowledge, research, questions, and techniques relative to sports medicine in order to help advance the field of sports medicine.

Dr. Paul Ryan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Osteology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sports medicine
  • orthopedic surgery
  • athletic injury
  • knee instability
  • shoulder instability
  • trauma
  • pain management
  • ligamentous reconstruction
  • extremity injury
  • rehabilitation
  • return to play
  • fracture care

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 2162 KiB  
Article
Single-Lateral-Incision Technique for Talar Neck Fractures—A Viable Option
by Paul M. Ryan, Jacob Arthur, Keanu McMurray and Alicia Unangst
Osteology 2023, 3(4), 122-130; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology3040013 - 20 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1212
Abstract
Background: Displaced talar neck fractures are subject to avascular necrosis and degenerative joint disease. A single-lateral-incision approach may avoid damage to the remaining blood supply to the talar body provided by the deltoid artery. The purpose of this paper is to describe the [...] Read more.
Background: Displaced talar neck fractures are subject to avascular necrosis and degenerative joint disease. A single-lateral-incision approach may avoid damage to the remaining blood supply to the talar body provided by the deltoid artery. The purpose of this paper is to describe the surgical technique for a single approach to talar neck fractures, to evaluate the outcomes in a cohort of patients, and to review the literature on the topic. Method: A retrospective review. Patients were identified at a single medical center and met the following inclusion criteria: closed fracture, type-II talar neck fracture with displacement of the subtalar joint, single lateral operative approach, and radiographic follow-up of at least 6 months. Results: Five patients were identified meeting the inclusion criteria. The mean follow-up was 18 months (12–25). The mean VAS (Visual Analog Score) score at the final follow-up was 1.2 (0–3). Four of five patients returned to running at the final follow-up. The one patient who did not return to running was able to bike and hike. There were no cases of avascular necrosis and no cases of degenerative joint disease. Conclusions: Although a two-incision approach could be considered for all displaced talar neck fractures, there are certain fractures that can be anatomically reduced and stabilized through a single lateral incision which may limit the risk of avascular necrosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Sports Medicine Based on Orthopedics and Osteology)
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7 pages, 917 KiB  
Article
Tibial Plateau Fractures among Alpine Skiers: A Retrospective Case Series
by Tyler R. Williamson, Joel N. Smith, Britta L. Swanson, John D. Robinson, Keith R. Swanson and Kyle E. Swanson
Osteology 2023, 3(3), 71-77; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology3030008 - 29 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1872
Abstract
The purpose of this retrospective case series was to review the demographics of alpine skiers who sustain tibial plateau fractures, evaluate the inter-observer reliability of the Schatzker classification for fractures sustained while alpine skiing, and to evaluate patient-reported outcomes. We hypothesized that most [...] Read more.
The purpose of this retrospective case series was to review the demographics of alpine skiers who sustain tibial plateau fractures, evaluate the inter-observer reliability of the Schatzker classification for fractures sustained while alpine skiing, and to evaluate patient-reported outcomes. We hypothesized that most tibial plateau fractures would be low-energy fracture patterns (Schatzker I–III) and occur in women and less-experienced skiers. Charts and radiographs of patients treated surgically for tibial plateau fractures caused by alpine skiing were evaluated. Patients treated less than two years prior to review were excluded. Patients who qualified were contacted to complete a questionnaire regarding their skiing experience, their pain levels experienced following their accident, the weather conditions during the accident, and their return to sport. Forty-seven patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 49, and 60% of the participants were male. There were 28 low-energy fracture patterns (Schatzker I–III) and 19 high-energy patterns (Schatzker IV–VI) with a 95.7% inter-observer reliability. Contrary to the hypothesis, tibial plateau fractures sustained while alpine skiing occurred in older, experienced riders. Approximately 40% were high-energy fractures. Although over 75% of patients reported having no pain or occasional pain at their final follow-ups, less than half of the patients returned to alpine skiing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Sports Medicine Based on Orthopedics and Osteology)
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9 pages, 2209 KiB  
Systematic Review
Participation in Elite Sport in Youth and Its Impact on Lifelong Bone Health
by Amelia Marriott, Fiona Kirkham-Wilson and Elaine Dennison
Osteology 2024, 4(3), 111-119; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology4030009 (registering DOI) - 21 Jun 2024
Viewed by 111
Abstract
Weight-bearing physical activity is considered beneficial to bone health throughout the course of life, with the most marked benefits for bone health often considered to be high levels of activity around the time of peak bone mass (PBM) acquisition. To date, the research [...] Read more.
Weight-bearing physical activity is considered beneficial to bone health throughout the course of life, with the most marked benefits for bone health often considered to be high levels of activity around the time of peak bone mass (PBM) acquisition. To date, the research focus has been on the benefits of recreational weight-bearing sporting activity. Participation in elite sport is associated with enhanced sporting activity but is often also associated with low body weight, menstrual disturbance in females, and rest periods following injury. The benefit of sporting activity may, therefore, be attenuated in these groups. Here, we undertook a systematic review to consider what evidence is available regarding whether elite sporting activity in young adulthood has lasting benefits for bone health. Studies of retired athletes aged >50 years, who participated in elite sport from 15 to 30 years, were considered for inclusion. Elite sport was defined as participation at the national level or above. Following protocol development, the search strategy was applied to PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Web of Science. The selection was managed with Rayyan software, and the bias was assessed using the Newcastle–Ottawa scale. Two reviewers independently identified papers; a third adjudicated and screened the final selection for consideration. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42021293644). Two reviewers screened 951 articles, of which 4 papers met the inclusion criteria. One paper reported findings in women and three in men; no paper included both sexes. The sample sizes varied from 24 to 193 and considered football, endurance running, weightlifting, and swimming. Bone density was measured at the femoral neck, trochanter, and lumbar spine. All studies reported higher density in former athletes than non-elite controls, though the information available regarding confounding lifestyle factors was variable. A meta-analysis was not possible as studies were too heterogenous. In conclusion, from the limited available evidence, our study suggests elite sporting activity in young adulthood may have lasting benefits for bone health. However, given the paucity of available data, we highlight an urgent need for future research, especially in female athletes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Sports Medicine Based on Orthopedics and Osteology)
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6 pages, 2645 KiB  
Case Report
Diagnosis and Management Controversies Illustrated by an Uncommon Case of Postpartum Pubic Symphysis Diastasis
by Ryan J. Bickley, Ronald G. Blasini, John D. Johnson and Paul M. Ryan
Osteology 2023, 3(3), 116-121; https://doi.org/10.3390/osteology3030012 - 20 Sep 2023
Viewed by 2255
Abstract
Pubic symphysis diastasis is a complication of pregnancy that can lead to prolonged recovery, persistent pain, and functional disability if managed inappropriately. There is a lack of universally accepted clinical guidelines with regards to the timeframe and defect criteria for surgical management, which [...] Read more.
Pubic symphysis diastasis is a complication of pregnancy that can lead to prolonged recovery, persistent pain, and functional disability if managed inappropriately. There is a lack of universally accepted clinical guidelines with regards to the timeframe and defect criteria for surgical management, which contributes to delayed care resulting in increased surgical complexity and subsequent impairments in functionality and quality of life. The current standard of care utilizes non-operative measures exclusively for separations measuring less than 2.5 cm correlating to symphyseal ligament sparing. Surgical interventions are typically reserved for severe cases or those resistant to initial non-operative treatment. Non-surgical methods have been attempted for 4–6 weeks, even in severe cases, with patients still requiring eventual surgery. We herein report an uncommon case of pubic symphysis diastasis measuring 5.5 cm and the successful implementation of non-surgical management to demonstrate the need for updated standardized treatment guidelines. The defect in this case was treated with early application of a pelvic binder resulting in anatomic alignment and full resolution of pain within 3 months, and full return to activity within 6 months. In conclusion, the establishment of management guidelines for pubic symphysis is recommended, including the use of non-surgical management early in the patient recovery process and in cases with diastasis greater than 2.5 cm. This treatment strategy may decrease morbidity, recovery time, and complications in affected patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Sports Medicine Based on Orthopedics and Osteology)
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