Special Issue "Nutritional Support for Osteosarcopenia"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Monica Serra
Website
Guest Editor
Division of Geriatrics, Gerontology & Palliative Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Geriatrics Research, Education & Clinical Center, South Texas Veterans Health Care System
Interests: metabolism; obesity; aging; cardiovascular health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Osteosarcopenia, an involuntary loss of bone and skeletal muscle mass, strength, and physical performance, can begin as early as the 4th decade of life. Multiple risk factors and mechanisms contribute to the development of osteosarcopenia, with dietary intake quality across the lifespan and malnutrition (both undernutrition and obesity) playing key roles. Therefore, nutritional interventions may be able to reduce the incidence and progression of osteosarcopenia. For this Special Issue, we would like to bring together papers focused on nutritional factors and their mechanisms influencing osteosarcopenia, with an emphasis on potential interventions (e.g., energy restriction, protein, essential amino acids, vitamin D, chronic disease management) that may reduce the incidence and progression of osteosarcopenia. Understanding the biological mechanisms that affect osteosarcopenia risk are needed to recognize the most efficacious dietary prescription to promote successful aging.

Dr. Monica Serra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sarcopenia
  • Osteoporosis
  • Nutrition
  • Dietary intake and supplementation
  • Aging

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Metabolomic Associations with Serum Bone Turnover Markers
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3161; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103161 - 16 Oct 2020
Abstract
Bone is a dynamic tissue that is in a constant state of remodeling. Bone turnover markers (BTMs), procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX), provide sensitive measures of bone formation and resorption, respectively. This study used [...] Read more.
Bone is a dynamic tissue that is in a constant state of remodeling. Bone turnover markers (BTMs), procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX), provide sensitive measures of bone formation and resorption, respectively. This study used ultra-high-resolution metabolomics (HRM) to determine plasma metabolic pathways and targeted metabolites related to the markers of bone resorption and formation in adults. This cross-sectional clinical study included 34 adults (19 females, mean 27.8 years), without reported illnesses, recruited from a US metropolitan area. Serum BTM levels were quantified by an ELISA. Plasma HRM utilized dual-column liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to identify metabolites and metabolic pathways associated with BTMs. Metabolites significantly associated with P1NP (p < 0.05) were significantly enriched in pathways linked to the TCA cycle, pyruvate metabolism, and metabolism of B vitamins important for energy production (e.g., niacin, thiamin). Other nutrition-related metabolic pathways associated with P1NP were amino acid (proline, arginine, glutamate) and vitamin C metabolism, which are important for collagen formation. Metabolites associated with CTX levels (p < 0.05) were enriched within lipid and fatty acid beta-oxidation metabolic pathways, as well as fat-soluble micronutrient pathways including, vitamin D metabolism, vitamin E metabolism, and bile acid biosynthesis. P1NP and CTX were significantly related to microbiome-related metabolites (p < 0.05). Macronutrient-related pathways including lipid, carbohydrate, and amino acid metabolism, as well as several gut microbiome-derived metabolites were significantly related to BTMs. Future research should compare metabolism BTMs relationships reported here to aging and clinical populations to inform targeted therapeutic interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Support for Osteosarcopenia)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Metabolomic associations with serum markers of bone turnover
Authors: Moriah P. Bellissimo; Joseph L. Roberts; Dean P. Jones; Ken H. Liu; Kaitlin R. Taibl; Karan Uppal; M. Neale Weitzmann; Roberto Pacifici; Hicham Drissi; Thomas R. Ziegler; Jessica A. Alvarez
Affiliation: 1 Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Lipids, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2 Emory Center for Clinical and Molecular Nutrition, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3 Department of Orthopaedics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 4 Atlanta Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA; 5 Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 6 Emory Microbiome Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
Abstract: Bone is a dynamic tissue that is in a constant state of remodeling. The bone turnover markers (BTMs) procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX) provide sensitive measures of bone formation and resorption, respectively. This study used ultra-high-resolution metabolomics (HRM) to determine plasma metabolic pathways and targeted metabolites related to markers of bone resorption and formation in adults. This cross-sectional clinical study included 34 adults (19 females, mean 27.8 years) without reported illness recruited from a U.S. metropolitan area. Serum BTM levels were quantified by ELISA. Plasma HRM utilized dual column liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to identify metabolites and metabolic pathways associated with the BTMs. Metabolites significantly associated with P1NP (P< 0.05) were significantly enriched in pathways linked to the TCA cycle, pyruvate metabolism, and metabolism of B vitamins important for energy production (e.g., niacin, thiamin). Other nutrition-related metabolic pathways associated with P1NP were amino acid (proline, arginine, glutamate) and vitamin C metabolism, which are important for collagen formation. Metabolites associated with CTX levels (P< 0.05) which were enriched within lipid and fatty acid beta-oxidation metabolic pathways, as well as fat-soluble micronutrients pathways including, vitamin D metabolism, vitamin E metabolism, and bile acid biosynthesis. P1NP and CTX were significantly related to microbiome-related metabolites (P<0.05). Macronutrient-related pathways including lipid, carbohydrate, and amino acid metabolism, as well as several gut microbiome-derived metabolites were significantly related to BTMs. Future research should compare metabolism-BTMs relationships reported here to aging and clinical populations to inform targeted therapeutic interventions.

Title: Weight Loss, Bone Loss, and Exercise: A Brief Review
Authors: Sarah J. Wherry
Affiliation: IMAGE Research Group Division of Geriatric Medicine | University of Colorado School of Medicine, USA
Abstract: Despite adverse metabolic and functional consequences of obesity, weight loss is often contra-indicated in older adults with obesity due to accompanying loss of bone mineral density (BMD) and subsequent increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. Several studies show a positive effect of exercise on BMD among weight-stable, older adults; however, data on the ability of exercise to preserve bone during WL is surprisingly equivocal. The purpose of this brief review is to provide a focused update on the literature assessing the efficacy of exercise as a countermeasure to weight loss associated bone loss, while also evaluating current understanding into the role of exercise and weight loss on bone remodeling.

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