Special Issue "Nutrition Informatics"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Yasmine Probst
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science, Medicine & Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
Interests: nutrition informatics; e-health; food composition; dietary methodology; dietary modelling
Dr. Kirsty Maunder
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science, Medicine & Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
Interests: nutrition informatics, e-health, foodservices, malnutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition informatics is a growing field within the health informatics discipline. It is a field focused on the management of information needs for dietetic practice. Nutrition informatics reaches many different areas of dietetics and has been shown to improve efficiencies, reduce costs, support research and ultimately enhance patient care. It is recommended that dietitians and nutritionists become aware of the potential benefits of nutrition informatics, become involved in technology initiatives, and take the lead in guiding the development and implementation of informatics for patient nutritional care.

Topics for this Special Issue may include but are not limited to electronic-health (e-health), mobile health (m-health), use of emerging technologies such as sensors, virtual reality or augmented reality, technological applications to clinical care processes or standardisation of terminology or algorithms embedded within the technologies.

This Special Issue on “Nutrition Informatics” aims to bring together this disparate work from research groups, and to enhance the field by creating an understanding of the topics it may include, as well as application to every day nutrition practice.

Dr. Yasmine Probst
Dr. Kirsty Maunder
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutrition informatics
  • Health informatics
  • E-health
  • M-health
  • Technology
  • Nutrition care process
  • Information management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
New Software for Gluten-Free Diet Evaluation and Nutritional Education
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2505; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102505 - 17 Oct 2019
Abstract
Following a gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only treatment for celiac disease. This diet must ensure the absence of gluten but also needs to be nutritionally balanced. Dietitians working in this field cannot properly evaluate energy and nutrient intake of celiac people because [...] Read more.
Following a gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only treatment for celiac disease. This diet must ensure the absence of gluten but also needs to be nutritionally balanced. Dietitians working in this field cannot properly evaluate energy and nutrient intake of celiac people because dietary programs available on the market do not contain the nutritional composition of gluten-free products (GFP). Here we present a new GFD evaluation software that contains more than 700 gluten-free rendered foodstuffs and their macronutrient composition. Apart from diet evaluation and design, the software represents a tool for nutritional education as well, since it shows diet appropriacy and indicates how to promote balanced self-care. Moreover, anthropometric and biochemical data or symptoms presence and diet adherence can be recorded and evaluated. This open free software, can be downloaded in its app format for mobiles and tablets. Software evaluation indicated its correct functionality and the importance of assessing a GFD with GFP instead of with their gluten-containing analogues. Thus, this software represents an essential e-Health tool, not only for proper GFD evaluation, but also for improving life quality of celiac and gluten sensitive people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Informatics)
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Open AccessArticle
Development of a Choline Database to Estimate Australian Population Intakes
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 913; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040913 - 23 Apr 2019
Abstract
The AUSNUT 2011–13 food composition database was expanded to include Australian choline values. The development began with a systematic literature review of published studies. Analytical data from the food studies were extracted and aligned with their equivalent AUSNUT food identification code. Global food [...] Read more.
The AUSNUT 2011–13 food composition database was expanded to include Australian choline values. The development began with a systematic literature review of published studies. Analytical data from the food studies were extracted and aligned with their equivalent AUSNUT food identification code. Global food composition databases containing choline values were matched to the remaining AUSNUT food codes, following the FAO INFOODS food matching guidelines, including adjustments for moisture and protein composition. Composite foods, and not further-specified foods, were developed using the Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) recipe files. The completed choline database was then employed to analyse the Australian National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey 2011–12, with population and sampling weightings applied. Survey respondents were classified into categories based on their level of choline intake and compared with the Australian Adequate Intake levels. Food sources of intake were also explored. Multiple linear regression models were developed for food group contributors to choline intake. Mean choline intakes varied from 151.50 mg for pregnant 14–18 years old, to 310.54 mg for 19–64 year old males. Less than 10% of the population by age and gender were achieving the Adequate Intake for choline. Eggs and their contributing food groups were the top ranked food sources of choline for the population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Informatics)
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