Does Diet Still Have an Important Role in Treating Hypertension?

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2024 | Viewed by 2167

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Baker Heart & Diabetes Institute, Melbourne 3004, Australia
Interests: heart disease; cardiovascular medicine; lipid metabolism; human nutrition; clinical pharmacology; clinical medicine; hypertension; humans; epidemiology; population studies; dietary interventions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hypertension is a major global burden of cardiovascular risk. Several classes of drugs are generally effective but are associated with adverse side effects. Recently developed drugs are expensive in less affluent countries as modern technologies seek target-specific compounds. This environment leads to the diminished use of dietary intervention even as an accepted valuable adjunct to pharmacological therapies. There is a need to explore the potential of established dietary measures, both eating patterns and specific evidence-based single compounds. This Special Issue attempts to establish the optimal dietary patterns that should be part of the routine management of high blood pressure.

Prof. Dr. Paul Nestel
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • human hypertension
  • dietary patterns
  • dietary intervention
  • population studies
  • pharmacology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 289 KiB  
Article
Exploring Lifestyle Factors and Treatment Adherence among Older Adults with Hypertension Attending a Mobile Health Unit (MHU) in a Rural Area of Central Portugal
by Cátia Pinto, Cláudia Chaves, João Duarte, António Raposo, Renata Puppin Zandonadi, Sara Monteiro and Edite Teixeira-Lemos
Nutrients 2024, 16(8), 1112; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16081112 - 10 Apr 2024
Viewed by 712
Abstract
This cross-sectional and analytical study aimed to characterize a sample of hypertensive older adults attending a Mobile Health Unit (MHU) in a rural area of central Portugal according to their lifestyle and to analyze the impact of lifestyles on treatment adherence. The sample [...] Read more.
This cross-sectional and analytical study aimed to characterize a sample of hypertensive older adults attending a Mobile Health Unit (MHU) in a rural area of central Portugal according to their lifestyle and to analyze the impact of lifestyles on treatment adherence. The sample comprised 235 Portuguese hypertense patients, mainly females (63.8%) with a mean age of 75 years (±8.14 years) and low level of education. The data collection was carried out through a questionnaire consisting of sociodemographic questions, dietary variables, an Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire, an International Physical Activity Questionnaire (Short Version), a Nutrition Health Determination Questionnaire, a Self-Care with Hypertension Scale, and an Adherence to Treatments Measurement Scale. Only 34.5% of the hypertensive patients have controlled blood pressure values (28.2% men and 38% women). However, more than half (56.2%) of the hypertensive patients are classified as adherent to therapeutic measures. The hypertensive individuals, who present higher levels of adherence to the treatment, do not present alcohol dependence, are frequent consumers of aromatic herbs, sporadically consume salt, present good nutritional health, and practice moderate physical activity. The predictor variables for treatment adherence are the self-care dimensions general dietary (p = 0.001), specific dietary (p = 0.034), physical activity (p = 0.031), and antihypertensive medication intake (p < 0.001). Hypertensive patients with healthier lifestyles present better levels of treatment adherence. Therefore, promoting physical activity and healthy dietary practices is necessary to improve treatment adherence and increase antihypertensive treatment’s effectiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Does Diet Still Have an Important Role in Treating Hypertension?)
15 pages, 313 KiB  
Article
Associations between Four Diet Quality Indexes and High Blood Pressure among Adults: Results from the 2015 Health Survey of Sao Paulo
by Paula Victoria Felix, Jaqueline Lopes Pereira and Regina Mara Fisberg
Nutrients 2024, 16(5), 629; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16050629 - 24 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1204
Abstract
Several dietary quality indexes (DQIs) have been proposed to investigate adherence to a healthy diet. However, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate their association with high blood pressure (BP) in Brazil. In the present work, we examine the association between [...] Read more.
Several dietary quality indexes (DQIs) have been proposed to investigate adherence to a healthy diet. However, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate their association with high blood pressure (BP) in Brazil. In the present work, we examine the association between four established DQIs—2020 Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2020), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), and Brazilian Healthy Eating Index (BHEI)—and high BP in a cross-sectional sample of Brazilian adults from the 2015 Health Survey of São Paulo with Focus on Nutrition. Based on two 24 h recalls adjusted for the within-person variation, higher HEI-2020 and BHEI total scores were inversely related to elevated BP (HEI-2020: OR 0.94, BHEI: OR 0.95). Individuals at the second quartile (OR 0.33) and the fourth quartile of BHEI (OR 0.35), as well as individuals with higher scores on dairy components (HEI-2020: OR 0.80, BHEI: OR 0.83, DASH: OR 0.75), and fruit components (AHEI: OR 0.82, HEI-2020: OR 0.72, BHEI: OR 0.77, DASH: OR 0.79) also presented lower odds for the occurrence of elevated BP. In conclusion, healthier diet quality using the HEI-2020 and BHEI indexes and the fruit and dairy components were identified as protective factors for high BP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Does Diet Still Have an Important Role in Treating Hypertension?)
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