Special Issue "What Works? Evidence Based Maternal, Child and Adolescent Nutrition Interventions"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Elizabeth Kristjansson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Psychology Centre for Research on Educational and Community Services, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K2L 1K9, Canada

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The SickKids Centre for Global Child Health has embarked on a project to produce up-to-date evidence on nutrition-related interventions for women and children in low- and middle-income countries. This has involved commissioning 11 systematic reviews, which are currently underway, that encompass nutrition-specific preventive and curative interventions across the lifecycle. This body of work will culminate in a seminal manuscript synthesizing the effects of these interventions on nutrition-related outcomes among pregnant women, newborns, infants, children, and adolescents, as well as constituting an update to the 2013 Lancet paper: What works? Interventions for maternal and child undernutrition and survival.

As each systematic review will also be published individually, we propose that the set of 11 reviews be published together in a supplement issue of Nutrients. The supplement would render a current and comprehensive summary of evidence themed around core interventions affecting maternal and child undernutrition but linked to an established conceptual framework. As a collective supplement, the individual papers would provide a compelling narrative to advance our knowledge of effective and potentially-scalable interventions to catalyze efforts to reduce maternal and child undernutrition in LMICs. The supplement would be cited as the reference for the reviews in the synthesis paper. Below is a list of the 11 reviews categorized according to their relevant life stage.

Life stage

Review title

Prenatal

 

 

1. The effects of preconception care and peri-conceptional nutrition interventions on maternal nutritional status and birth outcomes: a systematic review.

 

2. The effects of micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy on birth, child health, and development outcomes: a systematic review.

 

3. The ffects of dietary diversity and energy supplementation interventions during pregnancy on birth, child health, and development outcomes: a systematic review.

 

Neonatal

 

 

4. The effects of neonatal nutrition interventions on neonatal mortality and child health and development outcomes: a systematic review.

 

Infancy/childhood

 

 

5. The effects of micronutrient supplementation and fortification interventions on the health and nutritional status of young children: a systematic review.

 

6. The effects of strategies for infant and young child feeding (IYCF) promotion and support strategies on optimal IYCF practices, nutrition, growth, and health: a systematic review.

 

7. The effectiveness of interventions to manage acute malnutrition in children under five years of age in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

 

Childhood/adolescence

 

 

8. The effects of lifestyle modification interventions to prevent and manage child and adolescent obesity: a systematic review.

 

9. The impact of the food environment on diet-related health outcomes in school-age children and adolescents in low- and middle- income countries: a systematic review.

 

10. The effects of preventive nutrition interventions among adolescents on health and nutritional status in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

 

All stages

 

 

11. The effectiveness of community, financial, and technology platform interventions for improving maternal, child, and adolescent nutrition in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

 

Prof. Elizabeth Kristjansson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Open AccessReview
Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation During Pregnancy on Maternal, Birth, Child Health and Development Outcomes in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020491 (registering DOI) - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Almost two billion people are deficient in key vitamins and minerals, mostly women and children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Deficiencies worsen during pregnancy due to increased energy and nutritional demands, causing adverse outcomes in mother and child, but could be mitigated [...] Read more.
Almost two billion people are deficient in key vitamins and minerals, mostly women and children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Deficiencies worsen during pregnancy due to increased energy and nutritional demands, causing adverse outcomes in mother and child, but could be mitigated by interventions like micronutrient supplementation. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review that aimed to compile evidence from both efficacy and effectiveness trials, evaluating different supplementation interventions on maternal, birth, child health, and developmental outcomes. We evaluated randomized controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies published since 1995 in peer-reviewed and grey literature that assessed the effects of calcium, vitamin A, iron, vitamin D, and zinc supplementation compared to placebo/no treatment; iron-folic (IFA) supplementation compared to folic acid only; multiple micronutrient (MMN) supplementation compared to IFA; and lipid-based nutrient supplementation (LNS) compared to MMN supplementation. Seventy-two studies, which collectively involved 314 papers (451,723 women), were included. Meta-analyses showed improvement in several key birth outcomes, such as preterm birth, small-for-gestational age (SGA) and low birthweight with MMN supplementation, compared to IFA. MMN also improved child outcomes, including diarrhea incidence and retinol concentration, which are findings not previously reported. Across all comparisons, micronutrient supplementation had little to no effect on mortality (maternal, neonatal, perinatal, and infant) outcomes, which is consistent with other systematic reviews. IFA supplementation showed notable improvement in maternal anemia and the reduction in low birthweight, whereas LNS supplementation had no apparent effect on outcomes; further research that compares LNS and MMN supplementation could help understand differences with these commodities. For single micronutrient supplementation, improvements were noted in only a few outcomes, mainly pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (calcium), maternal anemia (iron), preterm births (vitamin D), and maternal serum zinc concentration (zinc). These findings highlight that micronutrient-specific supplementation should be tailored to specific groups or needs for maximum benefit. In addition, they further contribute to the ongoing discourse of choosing antenatal MMN over IFA as the standard of care in LMICs. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Micronutrient Supplementation and Fortification Interventions on Health and Development Outcomes among Children Under-Five in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020289 - 21 Jan 2020
Abstract
Micronutrient deficiencies continue to be widespread among children under-five in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), despite the fact that several effective strategies now exist to prevent them. This kind of malnutrition can have several immediate and long-term consequences, including stunted growth, a higher [...] Read more.
Micronutrient deficiencies continue to be widespread among children under-five in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), despite the fact that several effective strategies now exist to prevent them. This kind of malnutrition can have several immediate and long-term consequences, including stunted growth, a higher risk of acquiring infections, and poor development outcomes, all of which may lead to a child not achieving his or her full potential. This review systematically synthesizes the available evidence on the strategies used to prevent micronutrient malnutrition among children under-five in LMICs, including single and multiple micronutrient (MMN) supplementation, lipid-based nutrient supplementation (LNS), targeted and large-scale fortification, and point-of-use-fortification with micronutrient powders (MNPs). We searched relevant databases and grey literature, retrieving 35,924 papers. After application of eligibility criteria, we included 197 unique studies. Of note, we examined the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. We found that certain outcomes, such as anemia, responded to several intervention types. The risk of anemia was reduced with iron alone, iron-folic acid, MMN supplementation, MNPs, targeted fortification, and large-scale fortification. Stunting and underweight, however, were improved only among children who were provided with LNS, though MMN supplementation also slightly increased length-for-age z-scores. Vitamin A supplementation likely reduced all-cause mortality, while zinc supplementation decreased the incidence of diarrhea. Importantly, many effects of LNS and MNPs held when pooling data from effectiveness studies. Taken together, this evidence further supports the importance of these strategies for reducing the burden of micronutrient malnutrition in children. Population and context should be considered when selecting one or more appropriate interventions for programming. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Effectiveness of Interventions for Managing Acute Malnutrition in Children under Five Years of Age in Low-Income and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010116 - 01 Jan 2020
Abstract
Childhood malnutrition is a major public health concern, as it is associated with significant short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. The objective of this review was to comprehensively review the evidence for the management of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and moderate acute malnutrition [...] Read more.
Childhood malnutrition is a major public health concern, as it is associated with significant short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. The objective of this review was to comprehensively review the evidence for the management of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) according to the current World Health Organization (WHO) protocol using facility- and community-based approaches, as well as the effectiveness of ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF), prophylactic antibiotic use, and vitamin A supplementation. We searched relevant electronic databases until 11 February 2019, and performed a meta-analysis. This review summarizes findings from a total of 42 studies (48 papers), including 35,017 children. Limited data show some benefit of integrated community-based screening, identification, and management of SAM and MAM on improving recovery rate. Facility-based screening and management of uncomplicated SAM has no effect on recovery and mortality, while the effect of therapeutic milk F100 for SAM is comparable to RUTF for weight gain and mortality. Local food and whey RUSF are comparable to standard RUSF for recovery rate and weight gain in MAM, while standard RUSF has additional benefits to CSB. Prophylactic antibiotic administration in uncomplicated SAM improves recovery rate and probably improves weight gain and reduces mortality. Limited data suggest that high-dose vitamin A supplementation is comparable with low-dose vitamin A supplementation for weight gain and mortality among children with SAM. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Effects of Preventive Nutrition Interventions among Adolescents on Health and Nutritional Status in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010049 - 23 Dec 2019
Abstract
The objective of this review was to assess the impact of preventive nutrition interventions on health and nutritional status of adolescents aged 10–19 years in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We searched the databases until 5 February 2019 without any restrictions on publication, [...] Read more.
The objective of this review was to assess the impact of preventive nutrition interventions on health and nutritional status of adolescents aged 10–19 years in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We searched the databases until 5 February 2019 without any restrictions on publication, date, language, or publication status. A total of 10 studies (15 papers) including 10,802 participants assessing the impact of micronutrient supplementation/fortification were included in this review. We did not find any study assessing the impact of nutrition education and counseling or macronutrient supplementation among adolescents. Among primary outcomes, we are uncertain of the effect of iron supplementation with or without folic acid on anemia (daily supplementation; relative risk (RR): 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.42, 2.57; one study; 1160 participants; low-quality evidence; weekly supplementation; RR: 1.07, 95% CI: 0.46, 2.52; one study; 1247 participants; low-quality evidence). We are also uncertain of the effect of various micronutrient supplementation/fortification on body mass index (BMI) (calcium/vitamin D supplementation; (MD: −0.01 kg/m2; 95% CI: −1.20, 1.17; two studies; 730 participants; I2 94%; very-low-quality evidence, iron supplementation with or without folic acid; MD: 0.47 kg/m2; 95% CI: −0.17, 1.11; two studies; 652 participants; I2 37%; very-low-quality evidence, zinc supplementation; MD: 0.35 kg/m2; 95% CI: −0.15, 0.85; one study; 382 participants; very-low-quality evidence) and multiple micronutrient (MMN) fortification; MD: 0.23 kg/m2, 95% CI: −0.11, 0.57; two studies; 943 participants; I2 22%; very-low-quality evidence). None of the included studies reported any other primary outcomes including morbidity or adverse effects. Among secondary outcomes, iron supplementation with or without folic acid may improve hemoglobin concentrations, and calcium/vitamin D supplementation may improve serum 25(OH)D levels, while calcium only supplementation and calcium and vitamin D supplementation may marginally improve total body bone mineral density (BMD). We are uncertain of the effect of MMN fortification on hemoglobin concentrations, calcium supplementation on total body bone mineral content (BMC), calcium + vitamin D supplementation on total body BMC, and zinc supplementation on zinc levels. There is limited evidence of micronutrient supplementation/fortification among adolescents, especially adolescent boys, on health and nutritional status in LMICs. These findings should be interpreted with caution due to the low quality and limited number of studies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop