Special Issue "Ketogenic Dietary Therapy for Chronic Diseases: From Bedside to Bench to Bedside"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Timothy A. Simeone
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department Pharmacol, School of Medicine, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178, USA
Interests: epilepsy; neurodegenerative disease; sleep; neuroinflammation; neuro-metabolism; ketogenic diet; neuropharmacology; mitochondrial function; synaptic, cellular and network excitability
Assoc. Prof. Kristina A. Simeone
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department Pharmacol, School of Medicine, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178, USA
Interests: Epilepsy; sleep comorbidities; cardiorespiratory comorbidities; SUDEP; mitochondria bioenergetics; metabolic therapies; ketogenic diet

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrients is planning a Special Issue focusing on advances in ketogenic diet (KD) therapy in the prevention and management of epilepsy and other chronic diseases, as well as insights into the mechanisms of action. A growing number of clinical trials have firmly demonstrated the efficacy of KD in epilepsy. These data have strengthened the case for investigating KD use in epilepsy comorbidities and other neurological and peripheral diseases, including, but not limited to, sleep, diabetes, some cancers, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. At the same time, great strides have been made in identifying KD mechanisms that seem to transcend disease type, underlining the global usefulness of KD, and potentially indicating shared pathological processes of diverse diseases. This Special Issue, “Ketogenic Dietary Therapy for Chronic Diseases: From Bedside to Bench to Bedside”, welcomes manuscripts detailing human and animal studies focused on the role of KD in complex diseases, as well as in vitro studies aimed at elucidating the potential mechanisms of KD, including mediators; gene regulation; neuroprotection antiinflammation; mitochondrial bioenergetics; and cellular, synaptic, and network physiology. Primary research papers, up-to-date review articles, and commentaries are all welcome.

Assoc. Prof. Timothy A. Simeone
Assoc. Prof. Kristina A. Simeone
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ketogenic diet
  • Ketones
  • Fatty acids
  • Epilepsy
  • Neurological disease
  • Sleep
  • Autism
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Neuroglioma
  • Cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Mechanism of action

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Safety and Effectiveness of the Prolonged Treatment of Children with a Ketogenic Diet
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 306; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020306 - 24 Jan 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2369
Abstract
Background: The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment against drug-resistant epilepsy in children. The KD is a diet rich in fats that produces anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects that reduces seizures and improves the cognitive state. Nevertheless, it can produce side effects that [...] Read more.
Background: The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment against drug-resistant epilepsy in children. The KD is a diet rich in fats that produces anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects that reduces seizures and improves the cognitive state. Nevertheless, it can produce side effects that sometimes can be serious. Further, the effect on growth is quite controversial when used for an extended period of time. The aim of this paper was to assess the effectiveness, side effects, and repercussions in the development of children who have been treated with a KD for more than 2 years. Methods: Observational descriptive study of 26 pediatric patients on a KD, with data collection at baseline, at 3, 6, and 12 months, and then once a year. Number of seizures, type of seizures, anti-seizure drugs, anthropometry, side effects, and alterations in laboratory assessment were monitored. Results: In every assessment, about 60%–75% of the patients experienced a reduction in number of seizures of over 90%, and at least 50% experienced side effects, of which digestive issues, alteration in the lipid metabolism, and hypercalciuria were the most common. The KD significantly affected height after 2 years of treatment. Conclusions: The KD is an effective treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy. Its side effects, although common, are very mild; therefore, this constitutes a very safe treatment for children of all ages. More studies are needed to identify and prevent potential causes of growth retardation in children on the KD. Full article
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Review

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Review
Ketogenic Diet and Epilepsy
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2510; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102510 - 18 Oct 2019
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 7535
Abstract
Currently available pharmacological treatment of epilepsy has limited effectiveness. In epileptic patients, pharmacological treatment with available anticonvulsants leads to seizure control in <70% of cases. Surgical intervention can lead to control in a selected subset of patients, but still leaves a significant number [...] Read more.
Currently available pharmacological treatment of epilepsy has limited effectiveness. In epileptic patients, pharmacological treatment with available anticonvulsants leads to seizure control in <70% of cases. Surgical intervention can lead to control in a selected subset of patients, but still leaves a significant number of patients with uncontrolled seizures. Therefore, in drug-resistant epilepsy, the ketogenic diet proves to be useful. The purpose of this review was to provide a comprehensive overview of what was published about the benefits of ketogenic diet treatment in patients with epilepsy. Clinical data on the benefits of ketogenic diet treatment in terms of clinical symptoms and adverse reactions in patients with epilepsy have been reviewed. Variables that could have influenced the interpretation of the data were also discussed (e.g., gut microbiota). The data in this review contributes to a better understanding of the potential benefits of a ketogenic diet in the treatment of epilepsy and informs scientists, clinicians, and patients—as well as their families and caregivers—about the possibilities of such treatment. Since 1990, the number of publications on attempts to treat drug-resistant epilepsy with a ketogenic diet has grown so rapidly that it has become a challenge to see the overall trajectory and major milestones achieved in this field. In this review, we hope to provide the latest data from randomized clinical trials, practice guidelines, and new research areas over the past 2 years. Full article
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