Special Issue "Effects of Dietary Intake on Pancreas"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Valerio Pazienza Website E-Mail
Gastroenterology Unit IRCCS “Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza” Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (FG) Italy
Interests: Gene Expression; Gastroenterology; Pancreatic Diseases; Liver Diseases
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Marco Falasca Website E-Mail
Metabolic Signalling Group, School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences | Faculty of Health Sciences. Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Interests: signal transduction, cancer invasion and metastasis in prostate, breast and pancreatic cancers; phosphoinositide signalling; PI3-kinase/PDK1 signalling pathway

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The literature reports substantial evidence of the role of nutrition in pancreatic disease. Often this evidence is inconclusive due to confounding factors. Studies are needed to better clarify the interaction between dietary factors and pancreatic disease.

The pancreas is an organ of the digestive system with both endocrine and exocrine functions, which are involved in the control of blood sugar levels and metabolism within the body, and the digestion of substances by breaking down carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids in ingested food entering the duodenum from the stomach, respectively. Playing a vital role in the digestive system, it appears clear that the pancreas can be perturbed by dietary intake leading to pancreatic diseases. Nutritional status, nutraceuticals, active metabolites, pre and probiotics, additives, and preservatives can also have potential protective or harmful effects on pancreatic function and disease. The objective of this proposed Special Issue on “Effects of Dietary Intake on Pancreas” is to publish selected papers (reviews and/or clinical or experimental studies) dealing with specific aspects of nutrition that could play a role in pancreatic function, both in normal subjects and in patients with pancreatic disease. Moreover, we are also interested in the results of nutritional intervention for pancreatic cancer to understand the possible positive impact of nutrients in combination with the current therapies. This will pave the way for the development of novel nutritional intervention that can influence the survival rates and/or the quality of life of the patients.

Dr. Valerio Pazienza
Prof. Marco Falasca
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutrition, microbiota, and pancreatic disease
  • Nutritional status
  • The impact of nutrition of genes
  • Nutrition integrative therapy
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Prebiotics, probiotics, and postbiotics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Short-Term High-Starch, Low-Protein Diet Induces Reversible Increase in β-cell Mass Independent of Body Weight Gain in Mice
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1045; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051045 - 10 May 2019
Abstract
Long-term exposure to a high starch, low-protein diet (HSTD) induces body weight gain and hyperinsulinemia concomitantly with an increase in β-cell mass (BCM) and pancreatic islets number in mice; however, the effect of short-term exposure to HSTD on BCM and islet number has [...] Read more.
Long-term exposure to a high starch, low-protein diet (HSTD) induces body weight gain and hyperinsulinemia concomitantly with an increase in β-cell mass (BCM) and pancreatic islets number in mice; however, the effect of short-term exposure to HSTD on BCM and islet number has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated changes in body weight, plasma insulin levels, BCM and islet number in mice fed HSTD for 5 weeks followed by normal chow (NC) for 2 weeks. BCM and islet number were increased in mice fed HSTD for 5 weeks compared with those in mice fed NC. On the other hand, mice fed HSTD for 5 weeks followed by NC for 2 weeks (SN) showed decreased BCM and insulin levels, compared to mice fed HSTD for 7 weeks, and no significant differences in these parameters were observed between SN and the control NC at 7 weeks. No significant difference in body weight was observed among HSTD, NC and SN fed groups. These results suggest that a high-starch diet induces an increase in BCM in a manner independent of body weight gain, and that 2 weeks of NC feeding is sufficient for the reversal of the morphological changes induced in islets by HSTD feeding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Dietary Intake on Pancreas)
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Open AccessArticle
High Levels of Prebiotic Resistant Starch in Diet Modulate Gene Expression and Metabolomic Profile in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Mice
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 709; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040709 - 27 Mar 2019
Abstract
Cancer initiation and protection mainly derives from a systemic metabolic environment regulated by dietary patterns. Less is known about the impact of nutritional interventions in people with a diagnosis of cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of a [...] Read more.
Cancer initiation and protection mainly derives from a systemic metabolic environment regulated by dietary patterns. Less is known about the impact of nutritional interventions in people with a diagnosis of cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of a diet rich in resistant starch (RS) on cell pathways modulation and metabolomic phenotype in pancreatic cancer xenograft mice. RNA-Seq experiments on tumor tissue showed that 25 genes resulted in dysregulated pancreatic cancer in mice fed with an RS diet, as compared to those fed with control diet. Moreover, in these two different mice groups, six serum metabolites were deregulated as detected by LC–MS analysis. A bioinformatic prediction analysis showed the involvement of the differentially expressed genes on insulin receptor signaling, circadian rhythm signaling, and cancer drug resistance among the three top canonical pathways, whilst cell death and survival, gene expression, and neurological disease were among the three top disease and biological functions. These findings shed light on the genomic and metabolic phenotype, contributing to the knowledge of the mechanisms through which RS may act as a potential supportive approach for enhancing the efficacy of existing cancer treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Dietary Intake on Pancreas)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

  1. Gabriele Capurso

Email: [email protected]

Affiliation: Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS, Milan (Italy)

Tentative title: Nutritional status and exocrine pancreatic function and outcome in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  1. Pazienza Valerio

Email: [email protected]

Affiliation: Gastroenterology Unit IRCCS “Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza” Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (FG) Italy.

Tentative title: High levels of prebiotic resistant starch in diet modulate gene expression and metabolomic profile in pancreatic cancer xenograft mice

  1. Marco Falasca

Email: [email protected]

Affiliation: Metabolic Signalling Group, School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences. Curtin University, Perth, Australia

Tentative title: Nutrients and the Pancreas: An Epigenetic Perspective

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