Special Issue "DASH Diet and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Marie Kuczmarski Website E-Mail
Department of Behavioral Health and Nutrition, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
Interests: Dietary patterns; diet quality; nutritional biomarkers; aging; longitudinal studies; flavanoids; inflammation; nutritional status
Guest Editor
Dr. May A. Beydoun Website E-Mail
Behavioral Epidemiology Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, NIA/NIH/IRP
Interests: Dietary patterns; dietary behavior; nutritional biomarkers; health disparities; cognitive aging; obesity; metabolic syndrome; depression; inflammation; longitudinal studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The National Institutes of Health-developed DASH—Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet—is considered one of the best healthful eating plans. Findings from several research studies have provided evidence that this low-sodium diet has the potential to lower blood pressure and blood cholesterol.

Therefore, this Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “DASH Diet and Human Health”, has been developed to compile contemporary research on this important topic. We invite you and your collaborators to consider submission of your original research, protocol development and methodological studies, narrative or systematic reviews and meta-analyses. To better understand these complex relationships, we welcome all types of study designs in various populations, including large observational epidemiological studies, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, clinical and field trials, and qualitative investigations.

Potential topics may include, but are not limited to, the associations of the DASH diet with weight loss, metabolic disturbances and type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, longevity, age-associated health outcomes, and epigenetic age acceleration.

Prof. Marie Kuczmarski
Dr. May A. Beydoun
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • DASH diet
  • hypertension
  • adolescence, adulthood
  • obesity, cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease
  • diet quality
  • gene expression

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Interplay of Diet Quality and Alzheimer’s Disease Genetic Risk Score in Relation to Cognitive Performance Among Urban African Americans
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2181; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092181 - 11 Sep 2019
Abstract
We examined the interactive associations of poor diet quality and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) genetic risk with cognitive performance among 304 African American adults (mean age~57 years) from the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span (HANDLS) study. In this cross-sectional [...] Read more.
We examined the interactive associations of poor diet quality and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) genetic risk with cognitive performance among 304 African American adults (mean age~57 years) from the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span (HANDLS) study. In this cross-sectional study, selected participants had complete predictors and covariate data with 13 cognitive test scores as outcomes. Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), and mean adequacy ratio (MAR) were measured. A genetic risk score for AD in HANDLS (hAlzScore) was computed from 12 selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our key hypotheses were tested using linear regression models. The hAlzScore was directly associated with poor performance in verbal memory (−0.4 ± 0.2, 0.01) and immediate visual memory (0.4 ± 0.2, 0.03) measured in seconds, in women only. The hAlzScore interacted synergistically with poorer diet quality to determine lower cognitive performance on a test of verbal fluency. Among numerous SNP × diet quality interactions for models of cognitive performance as outcomes, only one passed correction for multiple testing, namely verbal fluency. Our results suggest that improved diet quality can potentially modify performance on cognitive tests of verbal fluency among individuals with higher AD genetic risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DASH Diet and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Adherence to DASH-Style Dietary Pattern Impacts on Adiponectin and Clustered Metabolic Risk in Older Women
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 805; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040805 - 09 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
While dietary patterns are related to the age-related progression of chronic diseases, to what extent different dietary patterns influence inflammatory and metabolic risk factors in older adults remains to be elucidated. Additionally, potential moderating effects by physical activity (PA) become important to clarify. [...] Read more.
While dietary patterns are related to the age-related progression of chronic diseases, to what extent different dietary patterns influence inflammatory and metabolic risk factors in older adults remains to be elucidated. Additionally, potential moderating effects by physical activity (PA) become important to clarify. Here, we hypothesize that dietary patterns are linked to inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers and that these links are independent of PA. The present study aims to explore links between two dietary constructs and biomarkers of systemic inflammation and metabolic health in older women, while considering time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). A cross-sectional analysis of a sample of 112 community-dwelling older women (65–70 years old) was performed. Dietary constructs based on the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and the dietary inflammatory index (DII) were determined from food records. MVPA was objectively assessed using accelerometry. Metabolic outcomes (waist circumference, systolic/diastolic blood pressures and levels of glucose, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol) and inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen and adiponectin) were determined using standardized procedures and a clustered metabolic risk score was derived. Adherence to DASH-style diet was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with a lower clustered metabolic risk, where women in the highest adherence group had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower waist circumference and blood glucose level compared to those in the lowest group. Further, a significantly higher (p < 0.05) adiponectin level was observed in the high DASH adherence group compared to those with low adherence. Notably, adjustment by waist circumference did not alter links with either adiponectin or blood glucose level. Importantly, all observed links remained significant after further adjustment for time in MVPA. Finally, no significant associations were observed when the dietary pattern was defined by the DII. The findings of this study demonstrate that DASH-style diets promote a systemic anti-inflammatory environment, while also mitigating clustered metabolic risk in older women. A key finding is that favourable impacts of the DASH-style diet are independent of time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA, which further strengthens healthy eating behaviours as a key target for clinical and public health interventions designed to prevent age-related metabolic abnormalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DASH Diet and Human Health)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

  1. Name: Dr. Deidra Crews

Affiliation: Division of Nephrology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Potential Topic: DASH Diet Accordant Foods in the Homes of Urban African Americans at Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease

  1. Name: Dr. Carol Boushey

Affiliation: Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center

Potential Topics: 1) The influence of DASH, and other diet quality indexes such as alternative Mediterranean diet, the Healthy Eating Index-2015, and the Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010) and health outcomes as part of the Dietary Patterns Methods Project.

2) Findings of a randomized pilot study to reduce DXA assessed visceral adiposity for which DASH was used as the active comparator in an intervention.

  1. Name: Prof. Katherine Tucker

Affliation: Center for Population Health, University of Massachusetts

Potential Topic: DASH diet and bone health in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

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