Nutritional Support for Kidney Transplantation

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 September 2024 | Viewed by 1560

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea
Interests: kidney transplantation; acute kidney injury

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Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Interests: intensive nephrology; microbiome

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea
Interests: kidney transplantation; intensive nephrology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition plays a crucial role in the overall health of kidney transplant patients, as it is essential for managing the immune system, promoting healing, preventing infections, and maintaining organ function after the transplant.

Generally, patients require optimal post-transplant support to address metabolic abnormalities, potential delayed graft function, postsurgical complications, and gut disturbances that contribute to undernutrition. Nutritional requirements also evolve over time following transplantation, necessitating individualized management.

However, further research is necessary to fully comprehend the significance of nutrition support in kidney transplantation. Specifically, more evidence is needed regarding the effects of post-transplant nutrition on renal function deterioration, obesity, dyslipidemia, anemia, diabetes/hyperglycemia, hypertension, and bone disease. Additionally, it is crucial to investigate the role of nutritional support in maintaining graft function and effectively treating post-transplant complications. This section on nutritional supports in kidney transplantation welcomes papers encompassing a broad range of topics, including nutritional interventions, microbiome studies, nutrition and medication interactions, and lifestyle modifications in kidney transplant environments.

Prof. Dr. Myung-Gyu Kim
Dr. Jihyun Yang
Dr. Tai Yeon Koo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nutrition
  • kidney transplant
  • metabolic diseases
  • microbiome
  • nutritional support

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

12 pages, 321 KiB  
Review
Nutritional Risk of Candidates for Simultaneous Pancreatic–Kidney Transplantation—A Narrative Review
by Agnieszka Mizerska, Marek Durlik and Karolina Kędzierska-Kapuza
Nutrients 2023, 15(19), 4179; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15194179 - 27 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1341
Abstract
Introduction: Not much is known about the significance of nutritional status and support in transplant surgery, least of all in simultaneous pancreatic and kidney transplantation. Malnutrition in the context of simultaneous pancreatic–kidney transplantation seems to be complex and a still poorly investigated problem. [...] Read more.
Introduction: Not much is known about the significance of nutritional status and support in transplant surgery, least of all in simultaneous pancreatic and kidney transplantation. Malnutrition in the context of simultaneous pancreatic–kidney transplantation seems to be complex and a still poorly investigated problem. Since SPKTX is highly qualified and also has a small volume procedure, it is difficult to obtain data from large cohorts of patients. The aim of this article is to gather existing evidence and information about the subject, as well as to elicit some questions and goals for the future. Methods: We searched through the Pub-Med database using the keywords “pancreas and kidney transplantation” combined with “nutritional risk”, “nutritional status”, “malnutrition”, “nutritional intervention”, and “frailty”, finding a total of 4103 matching results. We then narrowed it down to articles written in English with the full text available. We also researched through the references of articles most accurately matching our researched terms. Results: There are numerous tools that have been investigated for the screening of malnutrition, such as the NRI index, PNI index, NLR, SGA scale, and NRS-2002 scale, each of which proved to be of some use in predicting patient outcomes in different surgical settings. Since all of them differed in components and assessed parameters and, in the absence of more sensitive or infallible indicators, the most reasonable approach seems to evaluate them jointly. Conclusion: It is important to underline the necessity of nutritional screening and the subsequent introduction of adequate therapy while awaiting transplantation in an attempt to improve results. Considering the complexity of surgical procedures and the severity of underlying diseases with their intense metabolic components, the patient’s nutritional status seems to significantly influence results. Consequently, nutritional risk assessments should be a part of the routine care of patients qualified for transplantation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Support for Kidney Transplantation)
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