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Dietary Supplements for Chronic Pain and Inflammatory Diseases

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 August 2024 | Viewed by 6297

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Farmacia, University of G. d'Annunzio Chieti and Pescara, Chieti, Italy
Interests: phytochemistry; natural products; coumarin; chemical synthesis; HPLC, oxyprenylated, plant secondary metabolites identification and quantification; anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, ‘G. d’Annunzio’ Chieti-Pescara University, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti, Italy
Interests: pharmaceutical analysis; chemical synthesis; medicinal chemistry; phytochemistry; plant natural compounds; plant extraction; HPLC; GC/MS
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are setting up a Special Issue with the aim of providing updated information on how dietary supplements work to regulate chronic pain and inflammatory diseases.

Chronic pain is a complex and multifaceted condition. The neuroplastic changes that can occur in the CNS can lead to augmented pain transmission which involves changes in the nervous system and can have widespread effects on the body and mind, and thus it deserves to be considered a disease entity. Moreover, there has been an accumulation of evidence that points to the existence of a close association between chronic pain and inflammatory diseases.

They represent health disorders that affect a significant proportion of the population with an important decline in their well-being over an extended period of time. In this context, dietary supplement intake can support overall health and well-being. As such, this therefore may be retrained as an effective strategy in the regulation of chronic pain and inflammation.

In the field of food science, the interaction of food choices and the effect of the cumulative exposure to different dietary components as well as any single bioactive food component may have the potential for a strong impact in the prevention of the onset and progression of chronic pain and inflammatory diseases by monitoring and modulating many functions of the human body and maintaining homeostasis.

There already exist known dietary supplements with anti-inflammatory properties which are helpful in reducing pain and inflammation in several conditions, including omega-3 fatty acids, curcuminoids in curcumin, phenolic and terpene compounds in ginger, and the terpenic boswellic acids mixture in Boswellia.

Focusing on the combination of foods with multiple nutrients or ingredients and giving importance to natural molecular entities and their effects, it is necessary to provide new insight in such evidence. In this Special Issue of Nutrients, we welcome original research articles (including animal and clinical studies) and review articles on the current state of research in this field.

Dr. Salvatore Genovese
Dr. Serena Fiorito
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic pain
  • inflammatory diseases
  • widespread effects
  • well-being
  • food science
  • dietary supplements
  • bioactive food component
  • physical activity
  • multiple nutrients
  • natural molecular entities

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 5597 KiB  
Article
Preventive Roles of Rice-koji Extracts and Ergothioneine on Anxiety- and Pain-like Responses under Psychophysical Stress Conditions in Male Mice
by Kajita Piriyaprasath, Yoshito Kakihara, Atsushi Kurahashi, Mayumi Taiyoji, Kazuya Kodaira, Kotaro Aihara, Mana Hasegawa, Kensuke Yamamura and Keiichiro Okamoto
Nutrients 2023, 15(18), 3989; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15183989 - 14 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2050
Abstract
This study determined the effect of daily administration of Rice-koji on anxiety and nociception in mice subjected to repeated forced swim stress (FST). In a parallel experiment, it was determined whether ergothioneine (EGT) contained in Rice-koji displayed similar effects. Anxiety and [...] Read more.
This study determined the effect of daily administration of Rice-koji on anxiety and nociception in mice subjected to repeated forced swim stress (FST). In a parallel experiment, it was determined whether ergothioneine (EGT) contained in Rice-koji displayed similar effects. Anxiety and nociception were assessed behaviorally using multiple procedures. c-Fos and FosB immunoreactivities were quantified to assess the effect of both treatments on neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), and lumbar spinal dorsal horn (DH). FST increased anxiety- and pain-like behaviors in the hindpaw. Rice-koji or EGT significantly prevented these behaviors after FST. In the absence of formalin, both treatments prevented decreased FosB expressions in the PVN after FST, while no effect was seen in the NRM and DH. In the presence of formalin, both treatments prevented changes in c-Fos and FosB expressions in all areas in FST mice. Further, in vitro experiments using SH-SY5Y cells were conducted. Rice-koji and EGT did not affect cell viability but changed the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. In conclusion, Rice-koji could reduce anxiety and pain associated with psychophysical stress, possibly mediated by the modulatory effects of EGT on neural functions in the brain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements for Chronic Pain and Inflammatory Diseases)
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18 pages, 1192 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Boswellia serrata Extract and/or an Omega-3-Based Product for Improving Pain and Function in People Older Than 40 Years with Persistent Knee Pain: A Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Clinical Trial
by Silvia Pérez-Piñero, Juan Carlos Muñoz-Carrillo, Desirée Victoria-Montesinos, Ana María García-Muñoz, Luis Andreu-Caravaca, Mario Gómez, Melanie Schölzel, Ana I. García-Guillén and Francisco Javier López-Román
Nutrients 2023, 15(17), 3848; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15173848 - 3 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3867
Abstract
A single-center, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial with four arms was conducted in healthy subjects with persistent knee discomfort (pain intensity on 1–10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) > 3) aged 40 years and older treated with a dietary supplement for 8 weeks. [...] Read more.
A single-center, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial with four arms was conducted in healthy subjects with persistent knee discomfort (pain intensity on 1–10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) > 3) aged 40 years and older treated with a dietary supplement for 8 weeks. The study groups were Boswellia serrata extract (n = 29), an omega-3-based product (AvailOm® 50 High EPA) (n = 31), Boswellia + AvailOm® (n = 30), and placebo (n = 30). The intake of Boswellia + AvailOm® improved the quality of life (QoL) (WOMAC index) and some variables of muscle strength. Statistically significant differences between the AvailOm® and the placebo groups in the decrease of pain intensity were found. Weekly VAS scores showed a significant decrease in pain perception when comparing the AvailOm® product to the placebo, with the lowest VAS scores at week 8. Consumption of Boswellia improved sleep latency. The time to perform the Up and Go test decreased after the intake of AvailOm®. There was an increase in the omega-3 fatty acids, with the greatest increase in the Boswellia + AvailOm® group. AvailOm® was safe and effective in reducing pain and improving the QoL and functionality of subjects over 40 years with persistent knee pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements for Chronic Pain and Inflammatory Diseases)
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