Functional Foods as a New Therapeutic Strategy 2.0

A special issue of Nutraceuticals (ISSN 1661-3821).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 8604

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medical Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Universidad de Sevilla, 41009 Seville, Spain
Interests: functional foods; protein hydrolysate; antioxidant; immunomodulation; natural extracts; biopeptides; lupine; hemp
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Universidad de Sevilla, 41009 Seville, Spain
Interests: hydrolysates; peptides; lupine; oxidant stress; functional foods; nutraceuticals; atherosclerosis; MAFLD
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Functional foods have gained popularity in the scientific population due to their therapeutic and preventive use against certain pathological conditions.

Nowadays, numerous lines of research are dedicated to identifying bioactive compounds, as well as assessing their health properties. Thus, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic effects, among others, have been demonstrated for a large number of bioactive ingredients. These investigations have been conducted in both in vitro and/or in vivo systems. The final aim of all these studies is to generate sufficient knowledge to prepare new functional foods that improve the human lifestyle, without using synthesized chemical compounds.

Thus, functional foods are the present and the future in the prevention of several diseases.

This new Special Issue is a continuation of the previous Special Issue, “Functional Foods as a New Therapeutic Strategy”, which was closed on 31 December 2022, including more than 10 valuable peer-reviewed papers.

It welcomes the submission of original articles or reviews that can improve knowledge about the beneficial effects of functional foods.

Dr. Ivan Cruz-Chamorro
Dr. Guillermo Santos Sánchez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutraceuticals is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 1941 KiB  
Article
Melatonin Modulates Lipid Metabolism and Reduces Cardiovascular Risk in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice Fed a Western Diet
by Guillermo Santos-Sánchez, Ana Isabel Álvarez-López, Eduardo Ponce-España, Ana Isabel Álvarez-Ríos, Patricia Judith Lardone, Antonio Carrillo-Vico and Ivan Cruz-Chamorro
Nutraceuticals 2024, 4(2), 260-272; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals4020016 - 9 May 2024
Viewed by 591
Abstract
Melatonin (MLT), a natural compound found in the animal and vegetable kingdom, participates in several physiological processes. MLT exerts antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, among others, but information about its action on lipid metabolism is still scarce. For this reason, mice deficient in apolipoprotein [...] Read more.
Melatonin (MLT), a natural compound found in the animal and vegetable kingdom, participates in several physiological processes. MLT exerts antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, among others, but information about its action on lipid metabolism is still scarce. For this reason, mice deficient in apolipoprotein E (ApoE−/−) fed a Western diet (WD) were intragastrically treated with different concentrations of MLT (2 and 9 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. The lipid parameters were quantified, and, since links between cardiovascular risk and immune function and oxidative stress have been established, we also analyzed the population of leukocytes and the oxidative stress status. Although there was no change in the weight of the mice, a significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) was observed in mice treated with the higher concentration of MLT tested in this study. Additionally, an improvement in cardiovascular risk indexes was observed. A reduction in the hepatic total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C levels was also observed in the treated mice. Finally, a decrease in leukocytes and lymphocytes in particular, as well as an increase in the antioxidant status, were shown in MLT-treated mice. In conclusion, MLT is a promising candidate that could be considered as a possible functional ingredient capable of preventing cardiovascular risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods as a New Therapeutic Strategy 2.0)
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12 pages, 993 KiB  
Article
The Acute Effects of a Commercially Available Caffeinated and Caffeine-Free Thermogenic Dietary Supplement on Resting Energy Expenditure, Hunger, and Hemodynamic Responses
by Kworweinski Lafontant, Jacob Broeckel, Kara Phillips, Yasamian Alsayed, Wayne A. Ayers-Creech, Yuto Ohigashi, John Solis, Cassidy Bale, Arielle Parks, Scott Dankel and Bill I. Campbell
Nutraceuticals 2024, 4(1), 82-93; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals4010006 - 21 Feb 2024
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Abstract
There has been a rise in popularity of “stimulant-free” or caffeine-free fat loss supplements, but it is not well understood whether those fat loss supplements are effective at enhancing thermogenesis without caffeine’s influence. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects [...] Read more.
There has been a rise in popularity of “stimulant-free” or caffeine-free fat loss supplements, but it is not well understood whether those fat loss supplements are effective at enhancing thermogenesis without caffeine’s influence. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a caffeinated and non-caffeinated commercially available fat loss supplement on resting energy expenditure (REE), hunger, and hemodynamic variables in healthy adults. Twenty-five healthy male and female participants completed three separate laboratory visits after overnight fasts. Baseline assessments of REE, subjective hunger, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) were followed by ingestion of a caffeinated (Phoenix, Legion®; CAF), non-caffeinated (Phoenix Caffeine-Free, Legion®; NCAF), or placebo (PL) fat loss supplement. REE, hunger, HR, and BP assessments were repeated at 60-, 120-, and 180-min post-ingestion. CAF, but not NCAF, significantly elevated REE greater than PL at all time points (p < 0.05). NCAF significantly reduced hunger compared to CAF and PL at the 120-min time point (p = 0.006). CAF significantly increased diastolic BP 60-min post-ingestion and significantly increased systolic BP 120- and 180-min post-ingestion compared to NCAF and PL. Further research is warranted with respect to investigating non-caffeinated ingredients and their effects on REE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods as a New Therapeutic Strategy 2.0)
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12 pages, 2048 KiB  
Article
Protection against Microglia Senescence by the Dietary Supplement Dekosilhue® in BV2 Cells: A New Perspective for Obesity and Related Complications
by Vittoria Borgonetti, Chiara Sasia, Martina Morozzi, Lorenzo Cenci and Nicoletta Galeotti
Nutraceuticals 2023, 3(2), 250-261; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals3020020 - 23 May 2023
Viewed by 1716
Abstract
Growing evidence indicates chronic low-grade systemic inflammation as a major pathophysiological mechanism of obesity. Systemic inflammation provokes an immune response in the brain through the activation of microglia that results in the development of neuroinflammation, cellular senescence, and occurrence of neurological dysfunction. In [...] Read more.
Growing evidence indicates chronic low-grade systemic inflammation as a major pathophysiological mechanism of obesity. Systemic inflammation provokes an immune response in the brain through the activation of microglia that results in the development of neuroinflammation, cellular senescence, and occurrence of neurological dysfunction. In the efforts to identify an innovative intervention with potential efficacy on obesity and associated complications, our aim was to study the capability of the dietary supplement Dekosilhue® (DKS), successfully used for improving the control of body weight, to attenuate microglia senescent phenotype. Microglia senescence was induced by intermittent stimulation of BV2 cells with LPS 500 ng/mL every 72 h for 4 h/day, over a period of 10 days. DKS (100 µg/mL) treatment reduced ß-galactosidase activity and expression, the formation of senescence-associated heterochromatin foci to control levels, and increased cell viability of senescent BV2 (2 folds of control). DSK reduced the expression of Nuclear Factor-kB (NF-kB) (20% lower than control), a key molecule involved in the acquisition of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). DKS promoted a neuroprotective effect by increasing the cell viability of SH-SY5Y neuronal cells exposed to the senescent BV2 conditioned medium to values of non-senescent cells. In conclusion, DKS attenuated the senescent microglia phenotype, showing senotherapeutic activity that might be further investigated as adjunctive intervention for obesity and obesity-related neurological disturbances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods as a New Therapeutic Strategy 2.0)
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Review

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42 pages, 2359 KiB  
Review
Nutraceutical Aspects of Selected Wild Edible Plants of the Italian Central Apennines
by Francesca Fantasma, Vadym Samukha, Gabriella Saviano, Maria Giovanna Chini, Maria Iorizzi and Claudio Caprari
Nutraceuticals 2024, 4(2), 190-231; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals4020013 - 9 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1136
Abstract
All over the world, wild edible plants are an essential source of chemical components that justify their use in folk medicine. The aim of this review is to document and summarize the knowledge of ten wild plants analyzed in a previous study for [...] Read more.
All over the world, wild edible plants are an essential source of chemical components that justify their use in folk medicine. The aim of this review is to document and summarize the knowledge of ten wild plants analyzed in a previous study for their ethnomedical significance. Achillea millefolium, Borago officinalis, Foeniculum vulgare, Gentiana lutea, Juniperus communis, Laurus nobilis, Malva sylvestris, Satureja montana, Silybum marianum and Urtica dioica were the subjects of our study. They are commonly found in the central Italian Apennines and the Mediterranean basin. Phytochemicals contained in wild plants, such as phenols, polyphenols, flavonoids, condensed tannins, carotenoids, etc., are receiving increasing attention, as they exert a wide range of biological activities with resulting benefits for human health. Based on the 353 studies we reviewed, we focused our study on the following: (a) the ethnobotanical practices and bioactive phytochemicals; (b) the composition of polyphenols and their role as antioxidants; (c) the methodologies commonly used to assess antioxidant activity; (d) the most advanced spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques used to visualize and characterize all components (metabolomic fingerprinting). The potential of pure compounds and extracts to be used as nutraceuticals has also been highlighted through a supposed mechanism of action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods as a New Therapeutic Strategy 2.0)
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9 pages, 557 KiB  
Review
The Marine Alga Sargassum horneri Is a Functional Food with High Bioactivity
by Masayoshi Yamaguchi
Nutraceuticals 2024, 4(2), 181-189; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals4020012 - 8 Apr 2024
Viewed by 732
Abstract
Functional food factors can play a preventive and therapeutic role in several human diseases. The marine alga Sargassum horneri (S. horneri) has restorative effects in several types of metabolic disorders, including osteoporosis, diabetes, inflammatory conditions, and cancer cell growth. Osteoporosis is [...] Read more.
Functional food factors can play a preventive and therapeutic role in several human diseases. The marine alga Sargassum horneri (S. horneri) has restorative effects in several types of metabolic disorders, including osteoporosis, diabetes, inflammatory conditions, and cancer cell growth. Osteoporosis is widely recognized as a major public health problem. Bone loss associated with ageing and diabetic states was prevented through the intake of bioactive compounds from S. horneri water extract in vivo by stimulating osteoblastic bone formation and inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro. The intake of S. horneri water extract was found to have preventive effects on diabetic findings with an increase in serum glucose and lipid components. Furthermore, the S. horneri component has been shown to suppress adipogenesis from rat bone marrow cells and inflammatory conditions in vitro. Notably, the growth of bone metastatic human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, which induce bone loss with osteolytic effects, was suppressed through culturing with the S. horneri water extract component in vitro. The S. horneri component, which has a molecular weight of less than 1000, was found to suppress the activation of NF-κB signaling by tumor necrosis factor-α, a cytokine associated with inflammation, in osteoblastic cells and macrophage RAW264.7 cells in vitro, suggesting a molecular mechanism. The bioactive component of S. horneri may play a multifunctional role in the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders. This review outlines the advanced knowledge of the biological activity of the aqueous extract components of S. horneri and discusses the development of health supplements using this material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods as a New Therapeutic Strategy 2.0)
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18 pages, 3290 KiB  
Review
Momordica balsamina L.: A Plant with Multiple Therapeutic and Nutritional Potential—A Review
by Marème Thiaw, Issa Samb, Manon Genva, Mohamed Lamine Gaye and Marie-Laure Fauconnier
Nutraceuticals 2023, 3(4), 556-573; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals3040040 - 17 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2287
Abstract
This review seeks to deepen our comprehension of the African plant Momordica balsamina L. by elucidating its therapeutically important molecules and nutrient composition. Commonly referred to as the balsam apple, this plant species is extensively harnessed for its diverse therapeutic potential across its [...] Read more.
This review seeks to deepen our comprehension of the African plant Momordica balsamina L. by elucidating its therapeutically important molecules and nutrient composition. Commonly referred to as the balsam apple, this plant species is extensively harnessed for its diverse therapeutic potential across its various organs, including leaves, fruits, roots, and stems. Numerous bioactive molecules have been isolated or identified within this plant, notably encompassing polyphenols, flavonoids, terpenes, and carotenoids. These compounds exhibit a wide array of biological activities, ranging from antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and anti-carcinogenic to anti-malarial properties, among others. Furthermore, the leaves of Momordica balsamina L. stand out for their abundant micronutrients, proteins, and amino acids. This investigation aims to shed light not only on the botanical characteristics of the Momordica balsamina plant and its potential applications in traditional medicine but also on its chemical composition, biological functionalities, and physicochemical attributes, thus accentuating its nutritional advantages. Nonetheless, an intriguing avenue presents itself for the exploration of strategies to conserve this species, delve deeper into its potential within the cosmetics industry, and innovate methodologies for the synthesis or biosynthesis of these bioactive molecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods as a New Therapeutic Strategy 2.0)
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