Special Issue "Advances in Photonic and Plasmonic Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanophotonics: Characterization, Modelling, and Nanodevices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 January 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Nikolaos G. Semaltianos
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: laser ablation nanoparticle–polymer composites; laser materials microprocessing; laser additive manufacturing; nanomagnetism; semiconductor optoelectronics; thin-film technology; spectroscopy; microscopy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Photonic and plasmonic nanomaterials are nanomaterials whose interaction with photons results in electronic excitation and in charge or energy transfer. They find a large number of applications in chemical sensing, optoelectronics, catalysis, quantum information processing, photovoltaics, and others.

Size-dependent light emission from semiconducting quantum dots, due to the quantum confinement effect, forms the basis for their use in LEDs, displays, photodetectors, and medical imaging. Plasmon resonance absorption in metallic nanoparticles is used in the effective light coupling of solar cells or of surface enhanced Raman scattering. The photoexcitation of bimetallic nanoparticles is used in the catalysis of a hydrogen or oxygen evolution reaction or in the degradation of water contaminants. Nonstoichiometric binary semiconducting nanoparticles can produce wavelength controllable defects related luminescence. Hybrid nanostructures consisting of graphene and plasmonic nanoparticles can be used for photocatalytic dye degradation. Hybrids consisting of plasmonic nanoparticles and metal oxide nanoplates are used as chemical sensors. 

Photonic and plasmonic nanomaterials can be synthesized by a number of methods, including colloidal chemistry, laser ablation, spark current decomposition, electrochemistry, and others.

Nanomaterials invites papers for a Special Issue, Advances of Photonic and Plasmonic Nanomaterials. Experimental and theoretical articles will be accepted regarding the preparation, characterization, and application of photonic and plasmonic nanomaterials. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • semiconductor quantum dots
  • plasmonic metallic nanoparticles
  • nanocomposites
  • photonic metamaterials
  • photonic nanocrystals
  • photonic nanostructures
  • 2D-materials
  • carbon nanostructures

Dr. Nikolaos G. Semaltianos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • quantum dot
  • nanocrystal
  • plasmon resonance
  • metamaterial
  • nanocomposite
  • photonics
  • nanostructures
  • carbon

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Perfect Absorption Efficiency Circular Nanodisk Array Integrated with a Reactive Impedance Surface with High Field Enhancement
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 258; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020258 - 02 Feb 2020
Abstract
Infrared (IR) absorbers based on a metal–insulator–metal (MIM) have been widely investigated due to their high absorption performance and simple structure. However, MIM absorbers based on ultrathin spacers suffer from low field enhancement. In this study, we propose a new MIM absorber structure [...] Read more.
Infrared (IR) absorbers based on a metal–insulator–metal (MIM) have been widely investigated due to their high absorption performance and simple structure. However, MIM absorbers based on ultrathin spacers suffer from low field enhancement. In this study, we propose a new MIM absorber structure to overcome this drawback. The proposed absorber utilizes a reactive impedance surface (RIS) to boost field enhancement without an ultrathin spacer and maintains near-perfect absorption by impedance matching with the vacuum. The RIS is a metallic patch array on a grounded dielectric substrate that can change its surface impedance, unlike conventional metallic reflectors. The final circular nanodisk array mounted on the optimum RIS offers an electric field enhancement factor of 180 with nearly perfect absorption of 98% at 230 THz. The proposed absorber exhibits robust performance even with a change in polarization of the incident wave. The RIS-integrated MIM absorber can be used to enhance the sensitivity of a local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor and surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Photonic and Plasmonic Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Vortex Beam Encoded All-Optical Logic Gates Based on Nano-Ring Plasmonic Antennas
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1649; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121649 - 20 Nov 2019
Abstract
Vortex beam encoded all-optical logic gates are suggested to be very important in future information processing. However, within current logic devices, only a few are encoded by using vortex beams and, in these devices, some space optical elements with big footprints (mirror, dove [...] Read more.
Vortex beam encoded all-optical logic gates are suggested to be very important in future information processing. However, within current logic devices, only a few are encoded by using vortex beams and, in these devices, some space optical elements with big footprints (mirror, dove prism and pentaprism) are indispensable components, which is not conducive to device integration. In this paper, an integrated vortex beam encoded all-optical logic gate based on a nano-ring plasmonic antenna is proposed. In our scheme, by defining the two circular polarization states of the input vortex beams as the input logic states and the normalized intensity of the plasmonic field at the center of the nano-ring as the output logic states, OR and AND (NOR and NAND) logic gates are realized when two 1st (1st) order vortex beams are chosen as the two input signals; and a NOT logic gate is obtained when one 1st order vortex beam is chosen as the input signal. In addition, by defining the two linear polarization states (x and y polarization) of the input vortex beams as the two input logic states, an XNOR logic gate is realized when two 1st order vortex beams are chosen as the two input signals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Photonic and Plasmonic Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
High-Performance Transmission of Surface Plasmons in Graphene-Covered Nanowire Pairs with Substrate
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1594; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111594 - 10 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Graphene was recently proposed as a promising alternative to support surface plasmons with superior performances in the mid-infrared range. Here, we theoretically show that high-performance and low-loss transmission of graphene plasmons can be achieved by adding a silica substrate to the graphene-covered nanowire [...] Read more.
Graphene was recently proposed as a promising alternative to support surface plasmons with superior performances in the mid-infrared range. Here, we theoretically show that high-performance and low-loss transmission of graphene plasmons can be achieved by adding a silica substrate to the graphene-covered nanowire pairs. The effect of the substrate layer on mode properties has been intensively investigated by using the finite element method. Furthermore, the results show that inserting a low index material layer between the nanowire and substrate could compensate for the loss accompanied by the substrate, thus the mode properties could be adjusted to fulfill better performance. A reasonable propagation length of 15 μm and an ultra-small normalized mode area about ~10−4 could be obtained at 30 THz. The introduction of the substrate layer is crucial for practical fabrication, which provides additional freedom to tune the mode properties. The graphene-covered nanowire pairs with an extra substrate may inspire potential applications in tunable integrated nanophotonic devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Photonic and Plasmonic Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Densely Distributed Multiple Resonance Modes in a Fan-Shaped Plasmonic Nanostructure Demonstrated by FEM Simulations
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 975; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9070975 - 04 Jul 2019
Abstract
Multiple resonance modes have important applications since they can provide multi-frequency operation for devices and bring great flexibility in practice. In this paper, based on a fan-shaped cavity coupled to a metal-isolator-metal (MIM) waveguide, a new kind of ultracompact plasmonic nanostructure is proposed [...] Read more.
Multiple resonance modes have important applications since they can provide multi-frequency operation for devices and bring great flexibility in practice. In this paper, based on a fan-shaped cavity coupled to a metal-isolator-metal (MIM) waveguide, a new kind of ultracompact plasmonic nanostructure is proposed to realize multiple resonance modes with dense distribution in a broad spectral range, and demonstrated through finite-element method (FEM) simulations. As many as ten resonance modes with an average interval of about 30 nm are obtained. They originate from the coexistence and interference of three types of basic modes in the fan-shaped cavity, i.e., the ring-waveguide modes, the modes in a ring array of periodic air grooves, and the metal-core-cavity modes. The dependence of resonance modes on structure parameters is investigated, which can provide an effective guide for choosing appropriate multiple-resonance-mode structures. Furthermore, by means of adjusting the geometrical asymmetry induced by the axial offset of the metal core in the fan-shaped cavity, the resonance modes can be effectively modulated, and some new modes appear because the wave path in the cavity is changed. The result proposes a novel way to create multiple resonance modes in plasmonic nanostructures, providing additional degrees of freedom for tailoring the resonance spectra and promising applications in various plasmonic devices, such as optical filters, ultrafast switches, biochemical sensors, and data storages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Photonic and Plasmonic Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Linearly Tunable Fano Resonance Modes in a Plasmonic Nanostructure with a Waveguide Loaded with Two Rectangular Cavities Coupled by a Circular Cavity
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 678; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050678 - 01 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Linear tunability has important applications since it can be realized by using linear control voltage and can be used conveniently without requiring nonlinear scale. In this paper, a kind of plasmonic nanostructure with a waveguide loaded with two rectangular cavities coupled by a [...] Read more.
Linear tunability has important applications since it can be realized by using linear control voltage and can be used conveniently without requiring nonlinear scale. In this paper, a kind of plasmonic nanostructure with a waveguide loaded with two rectangular cavities coupled by a circular cavity is proposed to produce four Fano resonance modes. The transfer matrix theory is employed to analyze the coupled-waveguide-cavity system. By analyzing the property of each single cavity, it reveals that the Fano resonances are originated from the coupling effect of the narrow modes in the metal-core circular cavity and the broad modes in the rectangular cavities. Owing to the interference of different modes, Fano peaks have different sensitivities on the cavity parameters, which can provide important guidance for designing Fano-resonance structures. Furthermore, adjusting the orientation angle of the metal core in the circular cavity can easily tune the line profile of Fano resonance modes in the structure. Especially, the figure of merit (FoM) increases linearly with the orientation angle and has a maximum of 8056. The proposed plasmonic system has the advantage of high transmission, ultracompact configuration, and easy integration, which can be applied in biochemical detecting or sensing, ultra-fast switching, slow-light technologies, and so on. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Photonic and Plasmonic Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Enhancement of Single-Photon Emission Rate from InGaAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot/Nanowire Heterostructure by Wire-Groove Nanocavity
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 671; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050671 - 01 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Spontaneous emission of luminescent material is strongly dependent on the surrounding electromagnetic environment. To enhance the emission rate of a single-photon emitter, we proposed a wire-groove resonant nanocavity around the single-photon emitter. An InGaAs quantum dot embedded in a GaAs nanowire was employed [...] Read more.
Spontaneous emission of luminescent material is strongly dependent on the surrounding electromagnetic environment. To enhance the emission rate of a single-photon emitter, we proposed a wire-groove resonant nanocavity around the single-photon emitter. An InGaAs quantum dot embedded in a GaAs nanowire was employed as a site-control single-photon emitter. The nanoscale cavity built by a wire-groove perpendicular to the quantum dot with an extremely narrow width of 10 nm exhibited an extremely small volume of 10 × 40 × 259 nm3. Theoretical analysis showed that the emission rate of the quantum dot was dramatically enhanced by 617x due to the Purcell effect induced by the wire-groove cavity. A fast single-photon emitter with a rate of 50.2 GHz can be obtained that speeds up the data rate of the single-photon emitter. This ultrafast single-photon source would be of great significance in quantum information systems and networks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Photonic and Plasmonic Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Compounding Plasmon–Exciton Strong Coupling System with Gold Nanofilm to Boost Rabi Splitting
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 564; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040564 - 07 Apr 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Various plasmonic nanocavities possessing an extremely small mode volume have been developed and applied successfully in the study of strong light-matter coupling. Driven by the desire of constructing quantum networks and other functional quantum devices, a growing trend of strong coupling research is [...] Read more.
Various plasmonic nanocavities possessing an extremely small mode volume have been developed and applied successfully in the study of strong light-matter coupling. Driven by the desire of constructing quantum networks and other functional quantum devices, a growing trend of strong coupling research is to explore the possibility of fabricating simple strong coupling nanosystems as the building blocks to construct complex systems or devices. Herein, we investigate such a nanocube-exciton building block (i.e. [email protected]), which is fabricated by coating Au nanocubes with excitonic J-aggregate molecules. The extinction spectra of [email protected] assembly, as well as the dark field scattering spectra of the individual nanocube-exciton, exhibit Rabi splitting of 100–140 meV, which signifies strong plasmon–exciton coupling. We further demonstrate the feasibility of constructing a more complex system of [email protected] on Au film, which achieves a much stronger coupling, with Rabi splitting of 377 meV. This work provides a practical pathway of building complex systems from building blocks, which are simple strong coupling systems, which lays the foundation for exploring further fundamental studies or inventing novel quantum devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Photonic and Plasmonic Nanomaterials)
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