Special Issue "Nanoscale Materials and Technologies in Tissue Engineering"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Tal Dvir
Website
Guest Editor
Tel Aviv University George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, School for Molecular Cell Biology and Biotechnology, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel
Interests: tissue regeneration; biomaterials; regenerative medicine; nanoelectronics/engineered tissue hybrids; smart delivery systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In tissue engineering, cells are seeded in 3D biomaterial scaffolds, which provide mechanical support for the growing tissue, as well as biochemical and topographical cues for assembly and function. The desire to closely recapitulate the natural cellular microenvironment and improve tissue function has led researchers to incorporate nanoscale features within the fabricated scaffolds.

The scope of this Special Issue covers nanotechnological advances in tissue engineering. These include technologies for mimicking nanostructures of the extracellular matrix, and the use of inorganic nanoparticles and devices for improving, monitoring and regulating tissue function.

We look forward to receive your valuable contributions to this exciting Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Tal Dvir
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Tissue engineering
  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanopatterning
  • Scaffolds
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Nanoparticles
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Controlled release systems

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Channeled ECM-Based Nanofibrous Hydrogel for Engineering Vascularized Cardiac Tissues
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 689; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050689 - 02 May 2019
Abstract
Hydrogels are widely used materials for cardiac tissue engineering. However, once the cells are encapsulated within hydrogels, mass transfer to the core of the engineered tissue is limited, and cell viability is compromised. Here, we report on the development of a channeled ECM-based [...] Read more.
Hydrogels are widely used materials for cardiac tissue engineering. However, once the cells are encapsulated within hydrogels, mass transfer to the core of the engineered tissue is limited, and cell viability is compromised. Here, we report on the development of a channeled ECM-based nanofibrous hydrogel for engineering vascularized cardiac tissues. An omentum hydrogel was mixed with cardiac cells, patterned to create channels and closed, and then seeded with endothelial cells to form open cellular lumens. A mathematical model was used to evaluate the necessity of the channels for maintaining cell viability and the true potential of the vascularized hydrogel to form a viable cardiac patch was studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoscale Materials and Technologies in Tissue Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Injectable Alginate-Peptide Composite Hydrogel as a Scaffold for Bone Tissue Regeneration
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 497; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040497 - 01 Apr 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The high demand for tissue engineering scaffolds capable of inducing bone regeneration using minimally invasive techniques prompts the need for the development of new biomaterials. Herein, we investigate the ability of Alginate incorporated with the fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-diphenylalanine (FmocFF) peptide composite hydrogel to serve as [...] Read more.
The high demand for tissue engineering scaffolds capable of inducing bone regeneration using minimally invasive techniques prompts the need for the development of new biomaterials. Herein, we investigate the ability of Alginate incorporated with the fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-diphenylalanine (FmocFF) peptide composite hydrogel to serve as a potential biomaterial for bone regeneration. We demonstrate that the incorporation of the self-assembling peptide, FmocFF, in sodium alginate leads to the production of a rigid, yet injectable, hydrogel without the addition of cross-linking agents. Scanning electron microscopy reveals a nanofibrous structure which mimics the natural bone extracellular matrix. The formed composite hydrogel exhibits thixotropic behavior and a high storage modulus of approximately 10 kPA, as observed in rheological measurements. The in vitro biocompatibility tests carried out with MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells demonstrate good cell viability and adhesion to the hydrogel fibers. This composite scaffold can induce osteogenic differentiation and facilitate calcium mineralization, as shown by Alizarin red staining, alkaline phosphatase activity and RT-PCR analysis. The high biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties and similarity to the native extracellular matrix suggest the utilization of this hydrogel as a temporary three-dimensional cellular microenvironment promoting bone regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoscale Materials and Technologies in Tissue Engineering)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Biomedical Potential of Ultrafine Ag Nanoparticles Coated on Poly (Gamma-Glutamic Acid) Hydrogel with Special Reference to Wound Healing
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(5), 324; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8050324 - 14 May 2018
Cited by 10
Abstract
In wound care management, the prevention of wound infection and the retention of an appropriate level of moisture are two major challenges. Therefore, designing an excellent antibacterial hydrogel with a suitable water-adsorbing capacity is very important to improve the development of wound dressings. [...] Read more.
In wound care management, the prevention of wound infection and the retention of an appropriate level of moisture are two major challenges. Therefore, designing an excellent antibacterial hydrogel with a suitable water-adsorbing capacity is very important to improve the development of wound dressings. In this paper, a novel silver nanoparticles/poly (gamma-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) composite dressing was prepared for biomedical applications. The promoted wound-healing ability of the hydrogels were systematically evaluated with the aim of attaining a novel and effective wound dressing. A diffusion study showed that hydrogels can continuously release antibacterial factors (Ag). Hydrogels contain a high percentage of water, providing an ideal moist environment for tissue regeneration, while also preventing contraction of the wound. Moreover, an in vivo, wound-healing model evaluation of artificial wounds in mice indicated that silver/γ-PGA hydrogels could significantly promote wound healing. Histological examination revealed that hydrogels can successfully help to reconstruct intact epidermis and collagen deposition during 14 days of impaired wound healing. Overall, this research could shed new light on the design of antibacterial silver/γ-PGA hydrogels with potential applications in wound dressing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoscale Materials and Technologies in Tissue Engineering)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Scaffold Structural Microenvironmental Cues to Guide Tissue Regeneration in Bone Tissue Applications
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(11), 960; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8110960 - 21 Nov 2018
Cited by 21
Abstract
In the process of bone regeneration, new bone formation is largely affected by physico-chemical cues in the surrounding microenvironment. Tissue cells reside in a complex scaffold physiological microenvironment. The scaffold should provide certain circumstance full of structural cues to enhance multipotent mesenchymal stem [...] Read more.
In the process of bone regeneration, new bone formation is largely affected by physico-chemical cues in the surrounding microenvironment. Tissue cells reside in a complex scaffold physiological microenvironment. The scaffold should provide certain circumstance full of structural cues to enhance multipotent mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation, osteoblast growth, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, and subsequent new bone formation. This article reviewed advances in fabrication technology that enable the creation of biomaterials with well-defined pore structure and surface topography, which can be sensed by host tissue cells (esp., stem cells) and subsequently determine cell fates during differentiation. Three important cues, including scaffold pore structure (i.e., porosity and pore size), grain size, and surface topography were studied. These findings improve our understanding of how the mechanism scaffold microenvironmental cues guide bone tissue regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoscale Materials and Technologies in Tissue Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop