Special Issue "Advanced Nanocomposites for 3D Printing Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanocomposite Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Giovanni Spinelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
OLEM, Institute of Mechanics, Balgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria
Interests: Electromagnetic characterization and modeling of nanocomposites; 3D printing applications; strain sensors and structural health monitoring of polymeric structures; carbon-based particles; nanotechnology; development and optimization of advanced materials.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A recent research field involving the development and optimization of nanocomposites concerns the 3-dimensional printing (3DP) also known as additive manufacturing (AM) which allows fast and accurate fabrication of complex structures with wide range of sizes and forms thus favoring a low-cost and rapid prototyping. The introduction of nanotechnology into this innovative field offers huge potential and opportunities for the manufacturing of 3D printed parts with customizable properties and specific multifunctionality. Nowadays, for example, conductive filaments with remarkable electromagnetic, mechanical and thermal properties can be obtained by using carbon-based particles thus overcoming the harsh restrictions encountered with insulating materials classically used with this technology. Despite the achievements in the development of new materials, different issues regarding their applicability and optimization remain to be solved and therefore, further research investigations are expected for this.

The forthcoming Special Issue “Advanced Materials for 3D Printing Applications” aims at gathering and publishing original research papers, letters as well as review articles, which either add knowledge to the current understanding of nanocomposites suitable for additive manufacturing applications, or report new insights in this field.

It is my pleasure to invite you, as a renowned expert on the topic, to provide your precious contribution to this Special Issue.

Dr. Giovanni Spinelli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 3D prototyping
  • 3D filaments
  • Additive manufacturing
  • Advanced nanocomposites
  • 3D printing applications
  • Carbon-based materials
  • Thermoplastic polymers
  • Fused deposition modeling (FDM)

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
3D Printing of PDMS-Like Polymer Nanocomposites with Enhanced Thermal Conductivity: Boron Nitride Based Photocuring System
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 373; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020373 - 02 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 632
Abstract
This study demonstrates the possibility of forming 3D structures with enhanced thermal conductivity (k) by vat printing a silicone–acrylate based nanocomposite. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDSM) represent a common silicone-based polymer used in several applications from electronics to microfluidics. Unfortunately, the k value of the polymer [...] Read more.
This study demonstrates the possibility of forming 3D structures with enhanced thermal conductivity (k) by vat printing a silicone–acrylate based nanocomposite. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDSM) represent a common silicone-based polymer used in several applications from electronics to microfluidics. Unfortunately, the k value of the polymer is low, so a composite is required to be formed in order to increase its thermal conductivity. Several types of fillers are available to reach this result. In this study, boron nitride (BN) nanoparticles were used to increase the thermal conductivity of a PDMS-like photocurable matrix. A digital light processing (DLP) system was employed to form complex structures. The viscosity of the formulation was firstly investigated; photorheology and attenuate total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analyses were done to check the reactivity of the system that resulted as suitable for DLP printing. Mechanical and thermal analyses were performed on printed samples through dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and tensile tests, revealing a positive effect of the BN nanoparticles. Morphological characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, thermal analysis demonstrated that the thermal conductivity of the material was improved, maintaining the possibility of producing 3D printable formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanocomposites for 3D Printing Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
In Situ Ultraviolet Polymerization Using Upconversion Nanoparticles: Nanocomposite Structures Patterned by Near Infrared Light
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(10), 2054; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10102054 - 17 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 675
Abstract
In this paper, we report an approach to polymerization of a nanocomposite containing UV-polymerizable organic material and inorganic, NaYbF4:Tm3+ core-based nanoparticles (NPs), which are optimized for upconversion of near infrared (NIR) to ultraviolet (UV) and blue light. Our approach is [...] Read more.
In this paper, we report an approach to polymerization of a nanocomposite containing UV-polymerizable organic material and inorganic, NaYbF4:Tm3+ core-based nanoparticles (NPs), which are optimized for upconversion of near infrared (NIR) to ultraviolet (UV) and blue light. Our approach is compatible with numerous existing UV-polymerizable compositions and the NaYF4: Yb, Tm3+ core-based NPs are much more stable against harsh conditions than NIR organic photo-initiators proposed earlier. The use of a core-shell design for the NPs can provide a suitable method for binding with organic constituents of the nanocomposite, while maintaining efficient NIR-to-UV/blue conversion in the NaYbF4 core. The prepared photopolymerized transparent polymer nanocomposites display upconversion photoluminescence in UV, visible and NIR ranges. We also demonstrate a successful fabrication of polymerized nanocomposite structure with millimeter/submillimeter size uniformly patterned by 980 nm irradiation of inexpensive laser diode through a photomask. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanocomposites for 3D Printing Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Filament Extrusion, 3D Printing and Hot-Pressing on Electrical and Tensile Properties of Poly(Lactic) Acid Composites Filled with Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10010035 - 21 Dec 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1254
Abstract
In this study, the effects of three processing stages: filament extrusion, 3D printing (FDM), and hot-pressing are investigated on electrical conductivity and tensile mechanical properties of poly(lactic) acid (PLA) composites filled with 6 wt.% of multiwall carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs), graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), and combined [...] Read more.
In this study, the effects of three processing stages: filament extrusion, 3D printing (FDM), and hot-pressing are investigated on electrical conductivity and tensile mechanical properties of poly(lactic) acid (PLA) composites filled with 6 wt.% of multiwall carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs), graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), and combined fillers. The filaments show several decades’ higher electrical conductivity and 50–150% higher values of tensile characteristics, compared to the 3D printed and the hot-pressed samples due to the preferential orientation of nanoparticles during filament extrusion. Similar tensile properties and slightly higher electrical conductivity are found for the hot-pressed compared to the 3D printed samples, due to the reduction of interparticle distances, and consequently, the reduced tunneling resistances in the percolated network by hot pressing. Three structural types are observed in nanocomposite filaments depending on the distribution and interactions of fillers, such as segregated network, homogeneous network, and aggregated structure. The type of structural organization of MWCNTs, GNPs, and combined fillers in the matrix polymer is found determinant for the electrical and tensile properties. The crystallinity of the 3D printed samples is higher compared to the filament and hot-pressed samples, but this structural feature has a slight effect on the electrical and tensile properties. The results help in understanding the influence of processing on the properties of the final products based on PLA composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanocomposites for 3D Printing Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
3D Printing of UV-Curable Polyurethane Incorporated with Surface-Grafted Nanocellulose
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1726; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121726 - 03 Dec 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1565
Abstract
The recognition of nanocellulose has been prominent in recent years as prospect materials, yet the ineffectiveness of nanocellulose to disperse in an organic solvent has restricted its utilization, especially as a reinforcement in polymer nanocomposite. In this study, cellulose has been isolated and [...] Read more.
The recognition of nanocellulose has been prominent in recent years as prospect materials, yet the ineffectiveness of nanocellulose to disperse in an organic solvent has restricted its utilization, especially as a reinforcement in polymer nanocomposite. In this study, cellulose has been isolated and defibrillated as cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) from oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) fibers. Subsequently, to enhance its compatibility with UV-curable polyurethane (PU)-based resin, the surface hydrophilicity of CNF has been tailored with polyethylene glycol (PEG), as well as reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The dispersibility of reinforced modified CNF in UV-curable PU was examined through the transmittance interruption of resin, chemical, and mechanical properties of the composite printed using the stereolithographic technique. Evidently, the enhanced compatibility of modified CNF and UV-curable PU was shown to improve the tensile strength and hardness of the composites by 37% and 129%, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanocomposites for 3D Printing Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop