Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 1st International Online Conference on Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019).

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Guanying Chen
Website
Guest Editor
1. School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China
2. Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Biophotonics, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260-3000, USA
Interests: lanthanide, crystals and nanocrystals, nonlinear, biophotonics, solar cells
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue comprises selected papers from the Proceedings of the 1st International Online Conference on Nanomaterials, held 1–15 September 2018 on sciforum.net, an online platform for hosting scholarly e-conferences and discussion groups. In this 1st edition of the electronic conference, contributors were invited to provide papers and presentations from the field of nanomaterials, resulting in a wide variety of excellent submissions and topic areas, such as synthesis, materials, spectroscopy and microscopy, devices and energy, and bio and medicine. Selected papers that attracted the most interest on the web, or that provided a particularly innovative contribution, have been gathered for publication. These papers have been subjected to peer review and are published with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications. We hope this Conference Series will grow rapidly in the future and become recognized as a new way and venue by which to (electronically) present new developments related to the field of nanomaterials.

Prof. Dr. Ana María Díez-Pascual
Prof. Dr. Guanying Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials synthesis
  • self-assembly
  • surfaces and interfaces
  • carbon nanomaterials
  • hybrid nanomaterials
  • 2D-layered materials
  • nanophotonics and plasmonics
  • characterisation (microscopy, spectroscopy)
  • modelling and simulation
  • nanocatalysis
  • nanodevices
  • nanomaterials for energy conversion and storage
  • environmental nanoscience and nanotechnology
  • nanobioscience (excluding nanomedicine)
  • nanomedicine (excluding bioimaging)
  • bioimaging and sensors
  • nanosafety and toxicity

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Selected Papers from the 1st International Online Conference on Nanomaterials
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 1021; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9071021 - 17 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
After decades of intense research, nanomaterials are now an integral part of many applications and enjoy the attention of a large research community [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle
Optical Sensing of Humidity Using Polymer Top-Covered Bragg Stacks and Polymer/Metal Thin Film Structures
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 875; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060875 - 10 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Thin films with nanometer thicknesses in the range 100–400 nm are prepared from double hydrophilic copolymers of complex branched structures containing poly(N,N-dimethyl acrylamide) and poly(ethylene oxide) blocks and are used as humidity sensitive media. Instead of using glass or [...] Read more.
Thin films with nanometer thicknesses in the range 100–400 nm are prepared from double hydrophilic copolymers of complex branched structures containing poly(N,N-dimethyl acrylamide) and poly(ethylene oxide) blocks and are used as humidity sensitive media. Instead of using glass or opaque wafer for substrates, polymer thin films are deposited on Bragg stacks and thin (30 nm) sputtered Au–Pd films thus bringing color for the colorless polymer/glass system and enabling transmittance measurements for humidity sensing. All samples are characterized by transmittance measurements at different humidity levels in the range from 5% to 90% relative humidity. Additionally, the humidity induced color change is studied by calculating the color coordinates at different relative humidity using measured spectra of transmittance or reflectance. A special attention is paid to the selection of wavelength(s) of measurements and discriminating between different humidity levels when sensing is performed by measuring transmittance at fixed wavelengths. The influence of initial film thickness, sensor architecture, and measuring configuration on sensitivity is studied. The potential and advantages of using top covered Bragg stacks and polymer/metal thin film structures as humidity sensors with simple optical read-outs are demonstrated and discussed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Structural and Optical Characteristics of PVA:C-Dot Composites: Tuning the Absorption of Ultra Violet (UV) Region
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 216; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020216 - 06 Feb 2019
Cited by 20
Abstract
In this work the influence of carbon nano-dots (CNDs) on absorption of ultra violet (UV) spectra in hybrid PVA based composites was studied. The FTIR results reveal the complex formation between PVA and CNDs. The shifting was observed in XRD spectrum of PVA:CNDs [...] Read more.
In this work the influence of carbon nano-dots (CNDs) on absorption of ultra violet (UV) spectra in hybrid PVA based composites was studied. The FTIR results reveal the complex formation between PVA and CNDs. The shifting was observed in XRD spectrum of PVA:CNDs composites compared to pure PVA. The Debye-Scherrer formula was used to calculate the crystallite size of CNDs and crystalline phases of pure PVA and PVA:CNDs composites. The FESEM images emphasized the presence and dispersion of C-dots on the surface of the composite samples. From the images, a strong and clear absorption was noticed in the spectra. The strong absorption that appeared peaks at 280 nm and 430 nm can be ascribed to the n-π* and π-π* transitions, respectively. The absorption edge shifted to lower photon energy sides with increasing CNDs. The luminescence behavior of PVA:CNDs composite was confirmed using digital and photo luminescence (PL) measurements. The optical dielectric constant which is related to the density of states was studied and the optical band gap was characterized accurately using optical dielectric loss parameter. The Taucs model was used to determine the type of electronic transition in the samples. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Nanoparticle Intestinal Transport Using an In Vitro Co-Culture Model
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010005 - 21 Dec 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
We aimed to obtain a tunable intestinal model and study the transport of different types of nanoparticles. Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-cultures of different seeding ratios (7:3 and 5:5), cultured on Transwell® systems, were exposed to non-cytotoxic concentration levels (20 μg/mL) of silicon quantum dots and [...] Read more.
We aimed to obtain a tunable intestinal model and study the transport of different types of nanoparticles. Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-cultures of different seeding ratios (7:3 and 5:5), cultured on Transwell® systems, were exposed to non-cytotoxic concentration levels (20 μg/mL) of silicon quantum dots and iron oxide (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles. Transepithelial electric resistance was measured before and after exposure, and permeability was assessed via the paracellular marker Lucifer Yellow. At regular intervals during the 3 h transport study, samples were collected from the basolateral compartments for the detection and quantitative testing of nanoparticles. Cell morphology characterization was done using phalloidin-FITC/DAPI labeling, and Alcian Blue/eosin staining was performed on insert cross-sections in order to compare the intestinal models and evaluate the production of mucins. Morphological alterations of the Caco-2/HT29-MTX (7:3 ratio) co-cultures were observed at the end of the transport study compared with the controls. The nanoparticle suspensions tested did not diffuse across the intestinal model and were not detected in the receiving compartments, probably due to their tendency to precipitate at the monolayer surface level and form visible aggregates. These preliminary results indicate the need for further nanoparticle functionalization in order to appropriately assess intestinal absorption in vitro. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Exploring the Role of Nanoparticles in Enhancing Mechanical Properties of Hydrogel Nanocomposites
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(11), 882; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8110882 - 29 Oct 2018
Cited by 9
Abstract
Over the past few decades, research studies have established that the mechanical properties of hydrogels can be largely impacted by the addition of nanoparticles. However, the exact mechanisms behind such enhancements are not yet fully understood. To further explore the role of nanoparticles [...] Read more.
Over the past few decades, research studies have established that the mechanical properties of hydrogels can be largely impacted by the addition of nanoparticles. However, the exact mechanisms behind such enhancements are not yet fully understood. To further explore the role of nanoparticles on the enhanced mechanical properties of hydrogel nanocomposites, we used chemically crosslinked polyacrylamide hydrogels incorporating silica nanoparticles as the model system. Rheological measurements indicate that nanoparticle-mediated increases in hydrogel elastic modulus can exceed the maximum modulus that can be obtained through purely chemical crosslinking. Moreover, the data reveal that nanoparticle, monomer, and chemical crosslinker concentrations can all play an important role on the nanoparticle mediated-enhancements in mechanical properties. These results also demonstrate a strong role for pseudo crosslinking facilitated by polymer–particle interactions on the observed enhancements in elastic moduli. Taken together, our work delves into the role of nanoparticles on enhancing hydrogel properties, which is vital to the development of hydrogel nanocomposites with a wide range of specific mechanical properties. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis and Characterization of Graphene Oxide Derivatives via Functionalization Reaction with Hexamethylene Diisocyanate
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(11), 870; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8110870 - 23 Oct 2018
Cited by 10
Abstract
Graphene oxide (GO), the oxidized form of graphene, shows unique properties including high mechanical strength, optical transparency, amphiphilicity and surface functionalization capability that make it attractive in fields ranging from medicine to optoelectronic devices and solar cells. However, its insolubility in non-polar and [...] Read more.
Graphene oxide (GO), the oxidized form of graphene, shows unique properties including high mechanical strength, optical transparency, amphiphilicity and surface functionalization capability that make it attractive in fields ranging from medicine to optoelectronic devices and solar cells. However, its insolubility in non-polar and polar aprotic solvents hinders some applications. To solve this issue, novel functionalization strategies are pursued. In this regard, this study deals with the preparation and characterization of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI)-functionalized GO. Different reaction conditions were tested to optimize the functionalization degree (FD), and detailed characterizations were conducted via elemental analysis, Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopies to confirm the success of the functionalization reaction. The morphology of HDI-GO was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed an increase in the flake thickness with increasing FD. The HDI-GO showed a more hydrophobic nature than pristine GO and could be suspended in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as well as in low polar/non-polar solvents like tetrahydrofuran (THF), chloroform and toluene; further, the dispersibility improved upon increasing FD. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirmed that the covalent attachment of HDI greatly improves the thermal stability of GO, ascribed to the crosslinking between adjacent sheets, which is interesting for long-term electronics and electrothermal device applications. The HDI-GO samples can further react with organic molecules or polymers via the remaining oxygen groups, hence are ideal candidates as nanofillers for high-performance GO-based polymer nanocomposites. Full article
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