Special Issue "Application of Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Barbara Rolfe
Website
Guest Editor
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Interests: innate immunity; cancer immunotherapy; nanotechnology; drug delivery
Dr. Nicholas Fletcher
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Advanced Imaging and Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia
ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, and ARC Training Centre for Innovation in Biomedical Imaging Technology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
Interests: Nanomedicine; molecular imaging; drug delivery; theranostics; polymers
Prof. Kris Thurecht
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Advanced Imaging and Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia
ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, and ARC Training Centre for Innovation in Biomedical Imaging Technology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
Interests: molecular imaging; polymer chemistry; multimodal imaging; theranostics; drug delivery; nanomedicine
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The application of nanotechnology in medicine offers multiple advantages for effective drug delivery, with the potential to improve the efficacy and tolerability of new and old therapeutics. Nanomaterials-based products are already being applied clinically, with a number of FDA-approved imaging agents and drugs on the market and many more in clinical trials or under development. However, in order to fully realise the potential of nanomedicines, it is important to understand how the physicochemical properties and consequent bio-nano interactions of nanomaterials influence their drug release properties, interactions with cells and tissues, in vivo biodistribution, and ultimately, their fate.

Improved knowledge of such factors will provide fundamental understanding of governing interactions and allow us to more specifically fine tune nanomaterials depending on the required function.

This Special Issue aims to provide a snapshot of the range of novel nanomaterials under development, advances in the understanding of their interactions with biological entities, and their potential applications in the broader field of medicine and healthcare. We welcome the submission of original research articles and short communications, as well as reviews, mini-reviews, and systematic review articles that cover, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  1. The influence of physicochemical properties on nanomaterial behaviour in biological systems;
  2. Mechanisms by which nanoparticles can be fine tuned for particular applications;
  3. Methods for enhancing specificity of nanomaterial accumulation in disease;
  4. Improved understanding of nano-bio interactions;
  5. Nanomaterial safety and tolerability.

Dr. Barbara Rolfe
Dr. Nicholas Fletcher
Prof. Kristofer Thurecht
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • drug delivery systems
  • nanomedicine
  • biological interactions
  • materials design
  • safety and tolerability

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Fe/Mg-Modified Carbonate Apatite with Uniform Particle Size and Unique Transport Protein-Related Protein Corona Efficiently Delivers Doxorubicin into Breast Cancer Cells
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 834; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050834 - 27 Apr 2020
Abstract
Breast cancer is the abnormal, uncontrollable proliferation of cells in the breast. Conventional treatment modalities like chemotherapy induce deteriorating side effects on healthy cells. Non-viral inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) confer exclusive characteristics, such as, stability, controllable shape and size, facile surface modification, and unique [...] Read more.
Breast cancer is the abnormal, uncontrollable proliferation of cells in the breast. Conventional treatment modalities like chemotherapy induce deteriorating side effects on healthy cells. Non-viral inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) confer exclusive characteristics, such as, stability, controllable shape and size, facile surface modification, and unique magnetic and optical properties which make them attractive drug carriers. Among them, carbonate apatite (CA) particles are pH-responsive in nature, enabling rapid intracellular drug release, but are typically heterogeneous with the tendency to self-aggregate. Here, we modified the nano-carrier by partially substituting Ca2+ with Mg2+ and Fe3+ into a basic lattice structure of CA, forming Fe/Mg-carbonate apatite (Fe/Mg-CA) NPs with the ability to mitigate self-aggregation, form unique protein corona in the presence of serum and efficiently deliver doxorubicin (DOX), an anti-cancer drug into breast cancer cells. Two formulations of Fe/Mg-CA NPs were generated by adding different concentrations of Fe3+ and Mg2+ along with a fixed amount of Ca2+ in bicarbonate buffered DMEM (Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium), followed by 30 min incubation at 37 °C. Particles were characterized by turbidity analysis, z-average diameter and zeta potential measurement, optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS), pH dissolution, drug binding, cellular uptake, thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, stability analysis, and protein corona study by LCMS (Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry). Both formulations of Fe/Mg-CA displayed mostly uniform nano-sized particles with less tendency to aggregate. The EDX and FAAS elemental analysis confirmed the weight (%) of Ca, Fe and Mg, along with their Ca/P ratio in the particles. A constant drug binding efficiency was noticed with 5 μM to 10 μM of initial DOX concentration. A pH dissolution study of Fe/Mg-CA NPs revealed the quick release of DOX in acidic pH. Enhancement of cytotoxicity for the chemotherapy drug was greater for Fe/Mg-CA NPs as compared to CA NPs, which could be explained by an increase in cellular internalization as a result of the small z-average diameter of the former. The protein corona study by LCMS demonstrated that Fe/Mg-CA NPs exhibited the highest affinity towards transport proteins without binding with opsonins. Biodistribution study was performed to study the effect of DOX-loaded Fe/Mg-CA NPs on the tissue distribution of DOX in Balb/c 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. Both formulations of Fe/Mg-CA NPs have significantly increased the accumulation of DOX in tumors. Interestingly, high Fe/Mg-CA NPs exhibited less off-target distribution compared to low Fe/Mg-CA NPs. Furthermore, the blood plasma analysis revealed prolonged blood circulation half-life of DOX-loaded low and high Fe/Mg-CA NPs compared to free DOX solution. Modifying CA NPs with Fe3+ and Mg2+, thereby, led to the generation of nano-sized particles with less tendency to aggregate, enhancing the drug binding efficiency, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity without hampering drug release in acidic pH, while improving the circulation half-life and tumor accumulation of DOX. Therefore, Fe/Mg-CA which predominantly forms a transport protein-related protein corona could be a proficient carrier for therapeutic delivery in breast cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery)
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