Special Issue "Nanoscale Self-Assembly: Nanopatterning and Metrology"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Federico Ferrarese Lupi Website E-Mail
Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Torino, Italy
Interests: metrology; clock copolymers; nanopatterning; hierarchical assembly; directed self-assembly

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The self-assembly process underlies a plethora of natural phenomena from the macro to the nano scale. Often, technological development has found great inspiration in the natural world, as evidenced by numerous fabrication techniques based on self-assembly. One striking example is given by epitaxial growths, in which atoms represent the building blocks. In lithography, the use of self-assembling materials is considered an extremely promising patterning option to overcome the size scale limitations imposed by the conventional photolithographic methods. To this purpose, in the last two decades several supramolecular self-assembling materials have been investigated and successfully applied to create patterns at a nanometric scale (e.g., spherical colloids, block copolymers, nanotubes, and nanowires). Although considerable progress has been made so far in the control of self-assembly processes applied to nanolithography, a number of unresolved problems related to the reproducibility and metrology of the self-assembled features are still open. Addressing these issues is mandatory in order to allow the widespread diffusion of self-assembling materials for applications such as microelectronics, photonics, or biology. In this context, the aim of the present Special Issue is to gather original research papers and comprehensive reviews covering various aspects of the self-assembly processes applied to nanopatterning. Topics include but are not limited to the following:

- The theory, simulation, and synthesis of self-assembling materials;

- The development of novel self-assembly methods;

- The realization of nanometric structures and devices;

- The improvement of long-range order (directed self-assembly, dewetting, coassembly, and hierarchical assembly);

- Metrology issues related to the nanoscale characterization of self-assembed structures.

Dr. Federico Ferrarese Lupi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Self-assembly
  • Nanopatterning
  • Directed self-assembly
  • Hierarchical assembly
  • Clock copolymers
  • Nanosphere lithography
  • Nanomaterials
  • Nano metrology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Multimaterial 3D Printing for Arbitrary Distribution with Nanoscale Resolution
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(8), 1108; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9081108 - 02 Aug 2019
Abstract
At the core of additive manufacturing (3D printing) is the ability to rapidly print with multiple materials for arbitrary distribution with high resolution, which can remove challenges and limits of traditional assembly and enable us to make increasingly complex objects, especially exciting meta-materials. [...] Read more.
At the core of additive manufacturing (3D printing) is the ability to rapidly print with multiple materials for arbitrary distribution with high resolution, which can remove challenges and limits of traditional assembly and enable us to make increasingly complex objects, especially exciting meta-materials. Here we demonstrate a simple and effective strategy to achieve nano-resolution printing of multiple materials for arbitrary distribution via layer-by-layer deposition on a special deposition surface. The established physical model reveals that complex distribution on a section can be achieved by vertical deformation of simple lamination of multiple materials. The deformation is controlled by a special surface of the mold and a contour-by-contour (instead of point-by-point) printing mode is revealed in the actual process. A large-scale concentric ring array with a minimum feature size below 50 nm is printed within less than two hours, verifying the capacity of high-throughput, high-resolution and rapidity of printing. The proposed printing method opens the way towards the programming of internal compositions of object (such as functional microdevices with multiple materials). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoscale Self-Assembly: Nanopatterning and Metrology)
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Open AccessArticle
Tannic Acid-Mediated Aggregate Stabilization of Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-b-poly(oligo (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) Double Hydrophilic Block Copolymers
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 662; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050662 - 26 Apr 2019
Abstract
The self-assembly of block copolymers in aqueous solution is an important field in modern polymer science that has been extended to double hydrophilic block copolymers (DHBC) in recent years. In here, a significant improvement of the self-assembly process of DHBC in aqueous solution [...] Read more.
The self-assembly of block copolymers in aqueous solution is an important field in modern polymer science that has been extended to double hydrophilic block copolymers (DHBC) in recent years. In here, a significant improvement of the self-assembly process of DHBC in aqueous solution by utilizing a linear-brush macromolecular architecture is presented. The improved self-assembly behavior of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-b-poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PVP-b-P(OEGMA)) and its concentration dependency is investigated via dynamic light scattering (DLS) (apparent hydrodynamic radii ≈ 100–120 nm). Moreover, the DHBC assemblies can be non-covalently crosslinked with tannic acid via hydrogen bonding, which leads to the formation of small aggregates as well (apparent hydrodynamic radius ≈ 15 nm). Non-covalent crosslinking improves the self-assembly and stabilizes the aggregates upon dilution, reducing the concentration dependency of aggregate self-assembly. Additionally, the non-covalent aggregates can be disassembled in basic media. The presence of aggregates was studied via cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) and DLS before and after non-covalent crosslinking. Furthermore, analytical ultracentrifugation of the formed aggregate structures was performed, clearly showing the existence of polymer assemblies, particularly after non-covalent crosslinking. In summary, we report on the completely hydrophilic self-assembled structures in solution formed from fully biocompatible building entities in water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoscale Self-Assembly: Nanopatterning and Metrology)
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